IB Certificates instead of full IB Diploma Watch

1966zd
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Hello, I am starting at an International school next year, for 6th form. They only offer the IB Diploma. I won't be able to cope with the full program due to severe dyslexia, so the school are proposing that I choose only the subjects I want to do and will therefore not get an IB Diploma, but instead certificates for the courses I select.
I will most probably do Higher level Art and French B and Standard level Geography, Environmental Systems and English .
Does anyone know how this will be viewed by University admissions? I am thinking about a teaching degree.
Thanks for replying.
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zazou6864
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Not very good unfortunately and even though your doing as many subjects as A levels/ even more it’s looked down upon, in some cases even more than Btec because UK schools are still quite unfamiliar with IB. Many Uni’s dont accept IB certificates and so you will have to apply to a uni accepting Ucas points which is very few. I have 2 friends who have done this and they really struggled in finding a university. In my opinion you would be better off doing the full IB which is only 1 extra subject then you are currently thinking of doing - Maths studies which in fact is not too bad especially if you’ve done gcse maths or even gcse maths foundation. Worst case you do bad in maths but at least you have the full diploma and as long as you get passing grade in TOK and EE your fine. As for Teaching degrees I’m not too familiar of what unis offer those so another option would be checking that those unis accept Ucas points for application
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Yeshua saves
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I'm doing IB certificates too.

You may be able to get in some UK universities with IB certificates if you apply to a foundation degree or a degree with a foundation year. I think for regular Bachelor's degrees UK universities would prefer the IB Diploma, but I was told that IB HL courses are equivalent to A levels and three A levels are sufficient for entry into a UK university, so if you are doing at least three IB higher level subjects perhaps email the university you are interested in, though I personally wouldn't expect to get into very competitive UK universities. If you apply to a teaching degree and want to teach immediately after the degree, make sure that if it is a Bachelor of Arts degree that it is a degree with Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Some universities in the US may consider IB certificates (probably not the universities that are very competitive), but make sure to check their admission requirements and perhaps email the university to make sure.

These links may be helpful:
http://www.ibo.org/globalassets/publ...-index-en.xlsx
https://www.ibo.org/university-admis...ument-library/
Last edited by Yeshua saves; 3 weeks ago
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artful_lounger
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If your school is based in the UK they legally need to support you if you have dyslexia, and if they are trying to avoid that by encouraging you to not take the full programme, I think you need to make it very clear to them that not making reasonable adjustments for you would be a breach of the Equality Act 2010. I would suggest looking at other schools anyway honestly, because their suggestion seems very disingenuous at best, and a lazy way for them to avoid having to actually provide the support you need and are legally entitled to. It also sounds like they're trying to "miss-sell" you on your prospects without taking the full IBD.

The school should have support systems in place for students with dyslexia and should, along with the IBO, be able to make reasonable adjustments to your study (e.g. extra time in exams, additional support otherwise with additional learning technology to help you, scribes or readers potentially etc). I would strongly recommend you talk to your school about these possibilities because you will heavily limit yourself if you don't take the full diploma programme. Alternately, see if you can look for other schools which offer A-levels if you know the IBD is a no-go (and maybe otherwise, as above, because frankly this school sounds atrocious).

That aside, more directly in response to your query, it depends on which universities and courses, but in general I'd suggest if you can't do the full diploma and can't go somewhere else to take A-levels, you should at minimum plan to do 3 HL subjects, then maybe one or two SL subjects. HL subjects are generally considered the equivalent in terms of subject-specific content prerequisites to degree courses in the UK, and I doubt many universities will consider you for direct entry with less than 3 HL subjects (you may be able to apply to a foundation year or similar however). I cannot overstate how limited you will be if you don't either a) take the full IBD or b) take at least 3 HL subjects (with 1 or 2 SL subjects alongside), which would be the closest to the minimum expectation for students applying to UK universities

Depending on the teaching degree, some may be more flexible in terms of entry criteria - bear in mind teaching degrees in the UK tend to either be primary teaching (which is a first bachelors degree) or secondary teaching, which requires a first bachelors degree in a particular subject area, then a postgrad course called the PGCE normally. For secondary teaching, depending on what subject you want to teach, you'll need to do a first degree normally with at least 50% of that subject content in it, and these may have prerequisites in terms of required HL subjects (e.g. if you wanted to teach physics in secondary school, you'd normally need to do physics or a degree with a lot of physics content such as engineering, and those degrees would normally require HL Maths and HL Physics; this is just an illustrative example of course).

You could of course also do an Access to HE course afterwards if you find your school qualifications aren't suitable, but it would be easiest if you can get on the right track to start with. It really sounds to me like the school is trying to avoid their responsibilities and duties by getting you to a make decision which means they have less work to do, rather than supporting you in the full programme.

04MR17 may be able to advise more on the teaching stuff, and claireestelle might be able to offer some more input into dyslexia support and such (?) and/or correct any inaccuracies in the above
Last edited by artful_lounger; 3 weeks ago
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claireestelle
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
If your school is based in the UK they legally need to support you if you have dyslexia, and if they are trying to avoid that by encouraging you to not take the full programme, I think you need to make it very clear to them that not making reasonable adjustments for you would be a breach of the Equality Act 2010. I would suggest looking at other schools anyway honestly, because their suggestion seems very disingenuous at best, and a lazy way for them to avoid having to actually provide the support you need and are legally entitled to. It also sounds like they're trying to "miss-sell" you on your prospects without taking the full IBD.

The school should have support systems in place for students with dyslexia and should, along with the IBO, be able to make reasonable adjustments to your study (e.g. extra time in exams, additional support otherwise with additional learning technology to help you, scribes or readers potentially etc). I would strongly recommend you talk to your school about these possibilities because you will heavily limit yourself if you don't take the full diploma programme. Alternately, see if you can look for other schools which offer A-levels if you know the IBD is a no-go (and maybe otherwise, as above, because frankly this school sounds atrocious).

That aside, more directly in response to your query, it depends on which universities and courses, but in general I'd suggest if you can't do the full diploma and can't go somewhere else to take A-levels, you should at minimum plan to do 3 HL subjects, then maybe one or two SL subjects. HL subjects are generally considered the equivalent in terms of subject-specific content prerequisites to degree courses in the UK, and I doubt many universities will consider you for direct entry with less than 3 HL subjects (you may be able to apply to a foundation year or similar however). I cannot overstate how limited you will be if you don't either a) take the full IBD or b) take at least 3 HL subjects (with 1 or 2 SL subjects alongside), which would be the closest to the minimum expectation for students applying to UK universities

Depending on the teaching degree, some may be more flexible in terms of entry criteria - bear in mind teaching degrees in the UK tend to either be primary teaching (which is a first bachelors degree) or secondary teaching, which requires a first bachelors degree in a particular subject area, then a postgrad course called the PGCE normally. For secondary teaching, depending on what subject you want to teach, you'll need to do a first degree normally with at least 50% of that subject content in it, and these may have prerequisites in terms of required HL subjects (e.g. if you wanted to teach physics in secondary school, you'd normally need to do physics or a degree with a lot of physics content such as engineering, and those degrees would normally require HL Maths and HL Physics; this is just an illustrative example of course).

You could of course also do an Access to HE course afterwards if you find your school qualifications aren't suitable, but it would be easiest if you can get on the right track to start with. It really sounds to me like the school is trying to avoid their responsibilities and duties by getting you to a make decision which means they have less work to do, rather than supporting you in the full programme.

04MR17 may be able to advise more on the teaching stuff, and claireestelle might be able to offer some more input into dyslexia support and such (?) and/or correct any inaccuracies in the above
you've covered everything i would have said
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