Does anyone else think we’re taught to care a little too much about our mental health Watch

Anonymous #2
#21
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#21
I think it depends the extent to which these things happen. I can't stand spoilt kids who have their parents do everything for them.

When I was doing my exams, I was really proactive and did lots of work, so my parents never had to "nag" me whatsoever to do it. However, I live with my boyfriend and his 15yo son now, and he wouldn't do anything at all unless prompted. He never takes responsibility for his own work, so we have to tell him to revise - and yes, it does sometimes end in shouting, because we're worried for what his future will hold if he carries on the way he is. It's not like we're asking anything unreasonable. He's capable, but lazy.

With regards to chores, I don't think it's unreasonable to expect young people to do chores. Going back to my partner's son, when I first moved in he did absolutely nothing and was spoilt by everyone around him. I put my foot down and said I wasn't doing everything, but even now he doesn't do very much. He does the washing up after I've cooked a meal, and I've asked him to keep his room tidy and put his things in the washing basket etc - but that doesn't always happen. That's ALL he has to do in his life as well as revise, and he says the pressure is too much for him. God help him in the adult world, or even at sixth form, that's all I can say.

I agree with the third point, that your parents shouldn't mock you or call you names. There's a difference between playful banter and outright bullying, and you should be able to tell the difference pretty easily.

I do happen to agree that MH is treated in the wrong way at the moment. I think everyone is becoming SO aware of it that it's being overdiagnosed left right and centre, which means that those who really suffer sometimes don't get the help they need, or people just think they have a common, non-serious condition, which often isn't true.

For example, I know a few people who got diagnosed with anxiety disorders because of finals at uni. No. If you're not anxious about finals there's something wrong, and if the anxiety is specific to those exams, and goes away after, it's not a disorder.. it's normal, situational anxiety.

The same way that people get diagnosed with depression when they're grieving or going through a hard time. EVERYONE has to go through hard times, not all of those people are mentally ill. You can be sad without being depressed. You can be anxious without having anxiety. Of course there's a stage during grief when things should start to get better, and there's no doubt that grief can TRIGGER mental disorders, but over diagnosis is a really big problem at the moment, and it trivialises issues for those who are genuinely struggling.
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JavaScriptMaster
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Anonymous)
So last week in school we had a assembly on mental health. So anyway we were taught that it’s not right if your parents
- yell at you a lot and expect you to do well in school
- expect you to do a lot around the house like cook every night, do the dishes, clean the house etc on top of school work
- mock you and call you names

There’s a few more things but those are the things my mum does to me. I don’t know why but I think that’s not seriously bad they could be doing worse it’s not like it’s beating or burning with cigarettes.
does anyone else think these things are ok for your parents to do
It's a soft generation, everyone should be sheltered from pain, struggle and the hardships of the real world.... can't wait til you softies finish Uni and get a reality check
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Decahedron
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Claire461)
Not the responsibility of teachers to give young people lessons on how their parents should raise them. I don’t see what this has to do with mental health.
It is important for children to know what is normal and what is abusive because if you have only ever been raised in an abusive household they may feel that is "normal". Who do you feel should be teaching children about how to recognise abuse?

Abusive households have a very poor effect on mental health, not really that surprising.

It is particularly relevant at the moment with the inquest going on about the death of Amber Peat.
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hazar.1
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Anonymous)
So last week in school we had a assembly on mental health. So anyway we were taught that it’s not right if your parents
- yell at you a lot and expect you to do well in school
- expect you to do a lot around the house like cook every night, do the dishes, clean the house etc on top of school work
- mock you and call you names

There’s a few more things but those are the things my mum does to me. I don’t know why but I think that’s not seriously bad they could be doing worse it’s not like it’s beating or burning with cigarettes.
does anyone else think these things are ok for your parents to do
mental health is very important, lives end because of it! Please for the love of god if you have any problems think very hard about speak to someone do not take it lightly
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