is it okay to have your pocket searched at school

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pocketsearch
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#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
is it okay to have your pockets searched at school by the head teacher?
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LeapingLucy
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#2
Report 3 years ago
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If they have a genuine reason, then yes.

I.e. if they have sufficient grounds to believe that you're carrying something illegal or something that could endanger teachers/other pupils
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pocketsearch
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#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by LeapingLucy)
If they have a genuine reason, then yes.

I.e. if they have sufficient grounds to believe that you're carrying something illegal or something that could endanger teachers/other pupils
what if the headteacher wants to search you because you might have your phone? he wants to search you in his office? is this allowed?
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ll..
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#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by pocketsearch)
what if the headteacher wants to search you because you might have your phone? he wants to search you in his office? is this allowed?

Screening pupils at school

Schools can force pupils to be screened by a walk through or hand-held metal detector whether or not they suspect the pupil of having a weapon and without that pupil’s consent. Any member of staff can screen pupils. This type of screening without physical contact differs from the power to search pupils, as explained below.
If a pupil refuses to be screened, the school may refuse to allow the pupil on to the premises. This will be treated as an unauthorised absence and not an ExclusionA form of lawful punishment a school can give to a child. Students can be excluded from school on either a fixed-term or permanent basis. A fixed-term exclusion is for a specific, limited period of time. A pupil can be excluded on a fixed-term basis for a maximum of 45 days in any school year. Lunch time exclusions count for a half day in England. A fixed-term exclusion should be for the shortest possible time, and children should not be excluded for an unspecified period of time. A permanent exclusion involves the child being removed from the school roll (but this should only happen once there has been an unsuccessful appeal against the exclusion or once the time period in which an appeal must be lodged has passed).
" class="glossaryLink " style="box-sizing: border-box; border-bottom: 1px dotted rgb(190, 30, 45) !important; text-decoration: none !important; color: rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;">exclusion. For more information on unauthorised absences see our page on School attendance and absence.

Searching pupils with consent

School staff can search pupils with their consent for any item. The consent does not have to be in writing. If a member of staff suspects that a pupil has a prohibited item and the pupil refuses to agree to be searched then the school can punish the pupil in accordance with their school policy.

Searching pupils without consent

A headteacher or a member of staff authorised by the headteacher can carry out the search for prohibited items where there are reasonable grounds for suspecting that a pupil is in possession of a prohibited item.
The member of staff must be the same sex as the pupil and another member of staff should act as a witness. However, a search can be carried out by a member of staff who is of the opposite sex to the pupil and without a witness where the staff member reasonably believes that there is a risk of serious harm to a person if such a search is not carried out immediately and it is not reasonably practicable to call another member of staff. In such cases, staff should take into account the increased expectation of privacy for older pupils.
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