random user 24
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Which is better for a politics degree?
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LeapingLucy
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UCL doesn’t offer a politics degree - it offers a Politics and international relations degree. That hasn’t started yet though - the first intake will be in September 2019 so it’s currently impossible to say how good it will be.

Regarding LSE, which course are you referring to? Just politics, or politics and international relations like at UCL?
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random user 24
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ooops i meant politics and international relations, btw is Politics and international relations half of each degree or worth 2 degrees?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by random user 24)
ooops i meant politics and international relations, btw is Politics and international relations half of each degree or worth 2 degrees?
Whatever degree you do, it’s worth 1 degree. Never 2 degrees.

At LSE, politics will be half your degree and international relations will be the other half.

I don’t yet know how the UCL course will work. It may be a 50:50 split, it may be 70:30 or something else, I don’t know.
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random user 24
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I see, thanks for you information. Also, is there any reason KCL's politics and international course requirements are A*AA whilst LSE,OXFORD and UCL's are AAA (to the best of my knowledge at least)
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by random user 24)
I see, thanks for you information. Also, is there any reason KCL's politics and international course requirements are A*AA whilst LSE,OXFORD and UCL's are AAA (to the best of my knowledge at least)

Oxford doesn't have a politics and international relations course - are you referring to History and Politics or PPE?

Regarding your question, I don't know. I can only guess.

Maybe it's because they don't want to put off applicants who aren't necessarily predicted an A* but still have a huge amount of potential? Perhaps they want a wider pool of candidates to select from.

With Oxford, performance in interview will probably be more important to them than whether you got an A or A* in an A-level. LSE place a huge amount of importance on the personal statement.

With UCL, it's the first year of a new course - they don't know how many people will apply, so probably want to keep the barriers to entry quite low, to encourage as many people to apply as possible. If they get lots of applications this year - or in a few years once the course has become properly established - they may raise the entry requirements to A*AA.

I'd also say that while the advertised requirements are AAA, those probably don't apply to everyone. If you're applying from a top private school where you've had every educational advantage, you'd realistically need at least A*A*A. If you're applying from a struggling state school in a deprived area, which only gets a 30% pass rate at A-level, then AAA would be seen as more than enough.

Universities will consider your grades in the context in which you achieve them.
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qowngus91329
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Oxford doesn't have a politics and international relations course - are you referring to History and Politics or PPE?

Regarding your question, I don't know. I can only guess.

Maybe it's because they don't want to put off applicants who aren't necessarily predicted an A* but still have a huge amount of potential? Perhaps they want a wider pool of candidates to select from.

With Oxford, performance in interview will probably be more important to them than whether you got an A or A* in an A-level. LSE place a huge amount of importance on the personal statement.

With UCL, it's the first year of a new course - they don't know how many people will apply, so probably want to keep the barriers to entry quite low, to encourage as many people to apply as possible. If they get lots of applications this year - or in a few years once the course has become properly established - they may raise the entry requirements to A*AA.

I'd also say that while the advertised requirements are AAA, those probably don't apply to everyone. If you're applying from a top private school where you've had every educational advantage, you'd realistically need at least A*A*A. If you're applying from a struggling state school in a deprived area, which only gets a 30% pass rate at A-level, then AAA would be seen as more than enough.

Universities will consider your grades in the context in which you achieve them.
how's the reputation of LSE's pure politics (government)?
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