Preparing for no-deal Brexit - stockpiling canned food, etc? Watch

Poll: How will you be approaching the no-deal Brexit crash-out in March
Total panic (0)
0%
Stockpiling food (2)
13.33%
Protesting to survive (3)
20%
Making lists of emergency stuff (1)
6.67%
Relaxing, it's only Brexit (5)
33.33%
Nothing - is something about to happen then? (4)
26.67%
Fullofsurprises
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#1
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#1
The government are putting troops on standby, reserving space on ferries (perhaps so that ministers can flee the angry mobs?), buying up medicines and writing to all businesses telling them to get ready for No Deal. :afraid:

At the FoS residence, we are trying to decide what to do. Should we store up tinned food? My friend and I don't much like spam or tinned beans, but we're OK with tinned prunes and apricots. Should we also stockpile tinned cat food?

How will TSRians be preparing? Will you be approaching this with a Dunkirk spirit (lots of flag flying, martial music, listening to broadcasts from the Prime Minister, taking down iron railings, etc) or are you indifferent?

We await the chaos. :eek4:
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Fullofsurprises
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Kier Starmer, in Parliament just now:

" ...a Labour analysis of the no-deal technical notices published by the government in the summer showed that no deal would require the creation or expansion of 15 quangos, further legislation in 51 areas, the negotiation of 40 new international agreements, and the introduction of 55 new systems. It is not credible to pretend that that can by done by 29 March. A no-deal is completely lacking in viability... "

This must be true, but the question is, does the determination of the government to pander to hardcore Brexiteer extremists (not to mention the mad hats of the DUP) outweigh rational judgement?
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Qup
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What's wrong with a no-deal, exactly?

I'm ignorant on the matter, but I don't want no biased description of it; I just want facts and not opinions, or else I'd go to a journalist site for that.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
The government are putting troops on standby, reserving space on ferries (perhaps so that ministers can flee the angry mobs?), buying up medicines and writing to all businesses telling them to get ready for No Deal. :afraid:

At the FoS residence, we are trying to decide what to do. Should we store up tinned food? My friend and I don't much like spam or tinned beans, but we're OK with tinned prunes and apricots. Should we also stockpile tinned cat food?

How will TSRians be preparing? Will you be approaching this with a Dunkirk spirit (lots of flag flying, martial music, listening to broadcasts from the Prime Minister, taking down iron railings, etc) or are you indifferent?

We await the chaos. :eek4:
You live in the South, don't you?

Make sure you have all the ingredients to make emergency kedgeree and have a supply of fuel for the Aga.
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katf
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(Original post by Qup)
What's wrong with a no-deal, exactly?

I'm ignorant on the matter, but I don't want no biased description of it; I just want facts and not opinions, or else I'd go to a journalist site for that.
, 1 it would throw the Good Friday Agreement into chaos. There would have to be a border in Ireland, and that will not go down well with the Irish, and may reignite the Troubles.

2 Because there will have to be checks at the border, food and medicines will be delayed. That will put up costs and cause shortages.
3 it would be harder to export food. The EU would require checks. That takes time and money, so our goods would be less competitive.

There are more areas of concern, but essentially it would be bad.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Qup)
What's wrong with a no-deal, exactly?

I'm ignorant on the matter, but I don't want no biased description of it; I just want facts and not opinions, or else I'd go to a journalist site for that.
You'll get different opinions from different factions, but the general point is that crashing out means no negotiated agreements on a whole range of things, from fisheries to lorries and from air traffic control to space research.

This matters because at the moment, the UK has hundreds and hundreds (probably many thousands) of relationships between companies, organisations and government bodies in the UK and the EU, governing trade, research, travel, projects, security, environment and numerous other things.

The aim of a negotiated treaty is to have time (currently set at two years) after the Article 50 date in March (so, up to March 2021) to sort all these out and leave in a structured and less harmful way. If we don't agree any such arrangements with the EU, all bets are off and nobody knows for sure what will happen. Some well known things that could happen are:

* food running out - we import a lot of food from the EU and it might be held at the borders as custom checks kick in - also our farmers use lots of imported feed to feed animals in this country

* inability to travel - there may be massive queues at ports as new rules kick in and planes may not be able to fly, because our current airspace and airport rules are all set under EU agreements

* damage to many industries - lots of manufacturing and even many service companies rely on a "Just in Time" philosophy, which means that when a customer places an order, the production takes place of that individual order - and any parts/supplies/work needed from other EU countries is provided then. This is very widespread across industry now and if there are long delays at the ports or in other ways, it will cause huge disruption and make many businesses unviable.

* shortages of critical survival supplies such as medicines.

Nobody knows to what extent these things will happen, but many fear that they will and the government obviously believes they will, as they are currently holding emergency talks about them.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Trinculo)
You live in the South, don't you?

Make sure you have all the ingredients to make emergency kedgeree and have a supply of fuel for the Aga.
Oh. My. God. I just realised that guacamole might run out. :eek4:
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Tom2001
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
The government are putting troops on standby, reserving space on ferries (perhaps so that ministers can flee the angry mobs?), buying up medicines and writing to all businesses telling them to get ready for No Deal. :afraid:

At the FoS residence, we are trying to decide what to do. Should we store up tinned food? My friend and I don't much like spam or tinned beans, but we're OK with tinned prunes and apricots. Should we also stockpile tinned cat food?

How will TSRians be preparing? Will you be approaching this with a Dunkirk spirit (lots of flag flying, martial music, listening to broadcasts from the Prime Minister, taking down iron railings, etc) or are you indifferent?

We await the chaos. :eek4:
A no deal brexit is better than staying within the EU.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Tom2001)
A no deal brexit is better than staying within the EU.
Come back and repeat that after a year of hard crash-out. If you still have enough to eat to focus on the screen.
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generallee
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Starvation and no life saving medicines are the least of it. The dead won't be buried and there will be a zombie apocalypse.

Seriously!
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Kier Starmer, in Parliament just now:

" ...a Labour analysis of the no-deal technical notices published by the government in the summer showed that no deal would require the creation or expansion of 15 quangos, further legislation in 51 areas, the negotiation of 40 new international agreements, and the introduction of 55 new systems. It is not credible to pretend that that can by done by 29 March. A no-deal is completely lacking in viability... "

This must be true, but the question is, does the determination of the government to pander to hardcore Brexiteer extremists (not to mention the mad hats of the DUP) outweigh rational judgement?
The former DPP is so brilliant you cannot even spell his name. Shame on you.

I have to say if Civil Service are going on a recruitment drive, I (and mainly my bank account) won't be too displeased.
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generallee
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Come back and repeat that after a year of hard crash-out. If you still have enough to eat to focus on the screen.
Screen? There won't be any such thing, we will be going back to a subsistence economy.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Oh. My. God. I just realised that guacamole might run out. :eek4:
I don't think avacados come from the EU.
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Tom2001
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Come back and repeat that after a year of hard crash-out. If you still have enough to eat to focus on the screen.
I won't be doing that because it won't happen. Also, if I didn't have anything to eat I would have a computer. Get your priorities in order. The computer would be sold to survive.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by katf)
, 1 it would throw the Good Friday Agreement into chaos. There would have to be a border in Ireland, and that will not go down well with the Irish, and may reignite the Troubles.

2 Because there will have to be checks at the border, food and medicines will be delayed. That will put up costs and cause shortages.
3 it would be harder to export food. The EU would require checks. That takes time and money, so our goods would be less competitive.

There are more areas of concern, but essentially it would be bad.
4. The value of the pound will crash on the back of uncertainty and all imports will shoot skyhigh. To counter the inflationary pressure this will cause, the BofE will be forced to raise interest rates which will hit home owners and borrowers alike. This will then cause a recession that will hit jobs. Call it a triple whammy!
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Trinculo)
I don't think avacados come from the EU.

Most foodstuffs globally reach the UK via an EU member state, not as a direct import. This is due to economies of scale in super-ports like Rotterdam.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by ByEeek)
4. The value of the pound will crash on the back of uncertainty and all imports will shoot skyhigh. To counter the inflationary pressure this will cause, the BofE will be forced to raise interest rates which will hit home owners and borrowers alike. This will then cause a recession that will hit jobs. Call it a triple whammy!
But it'll all be fine. I know this because Liam Fox and Iain Duncan-Smith and Nigel Farage tell me it will.
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generallee
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Most foodstuffs globally reach the UK via an EU member state, not as a direct import. This is due to economies of scale in super-ports like Rotterdam.
If what you say is true then it is REALLY going to be tough for Ireland isn't it, since just about everything going to them comes through the UK first.

It is almost as if the EU can't actually play hardball without making one of their 27 suffer even more than us. Funny how the EU and Remoaners forget to mention that.
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ltsmith
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why are we getting a no-deal brexit? why is our pm refusing to negotiate a good deal or reintroducing the possibility of remaining ?
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by generallee)
If what you say is true then it is REALLY going to be tough for Ireland isn't it, since just about everything going to them comes through the UK first.

It is almost as if the EU can't actually play hardball without making one of their 27 suffer even more than us. Funny how the EU and Remoaners forget to mention that.
Ireland's stance has been much more about gaining visibility to their issues within the EU than about making problems for the UK. However, yes, it is 100% the case that nearly all Irish imports flow across the UK - the biggest routes are the ports like Holyhead and via aviation. Nearly all flights in and out of Ireland cross the UK. If Ryanair, for example, can't cross the UK then fares will shoot up for Ireland passengers.
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