Can you be a solicitor without going to uni or college ?

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Yeh888
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Can you become a solicitor just by doing an apprenticeship ?
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ddsizebra
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yes you can but you would likely be starting out as a paralegal but it allows to work closelh with lawyers/solicitors and help with their research in court cases. Going on apprenticeship in law is better than going straight to university because not only your employers pay for your tuitions and assessments (accreditation), you'll gain full exposure to the world of law and most good law firms would like evidence of the applicant working in a law firm as oppose to a newbie fresh from university even if they have a 1st honours degree. The downside is that it may take twice as long to become qualified as a solicitors and everyday will be grinding and hardwork.
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National Careers Service
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(Original post by Yeh888)
Can you become a solicitor just by doing an apprenticeship ?
Hi there,

Hoping I can offer some support.

If you want to become a solicitor without going to university then you will need to start in a lower position with a legal firm and do on the job training to work towards the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) Level 6 Professional Diploma in Higher Law and Practice.

This may still require some level of coursework and attending a local college/university to complete the education element of the training.

You can start on a level 2 or 3 apprenticeship and work your way up and you can now do a level 7 apprenticeship to qualify as a solicitor. This route usually takes around 5 years and to do this apprenticeship, you'll need:

5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) including English and maths
3 A levels at grade C or above or an equivalent level 3.

You can find more information on the routes you need to take using our job profile for a solicitor here - https://nationalcareers.service.gov....iles/solicitor

I hope this information helps and if you have further questions you can chat with a careers adviser through our website live - https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ontact-us/home

Good luck!

Sophie.
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xannypunanny
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(Original post by National Careers Service)
Hi there,

Hoping I can offer some support.

If you want to become a solicitor without going to university then you will need to start in a lower position with a legal firm and do on the job training to work towards the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) Level 6 Professional Diploma in Higher Law and Practice.

This may still require some level of coursework and attending a local college/university to complete the education element of the training.

You can start on a level 2 or 3 apprenticeship and work your way up and you can now do a level 7 apprenticeship to qualify as a solicitor. This route usually takes around 5 years and to do this apprenticeship, you'll need:

5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) including English and maths
3 A levels at grade C or above or an equivalent level 3.

You can find more information on the routes you need to take using our job profile for a solicitor here - https://nationalcareers.service.gov....iles/solicitor

I hope this information helps and if you have further questions you can chat with a careers adviser through our website live - https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ontact-us/home

Good luck!

Sophie.
There are different types of programmes/apprenticeships offered by each firm OP, just keep an eye on the careers sections of firm websites. I'm currently doing the L7 solicitor apprenticeship AMA
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yotsr123
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(Original post by xannypunanny)
There are different types of programmes/apprenticeships offered by each firm OP, just keep an eye on the careers sections of firm websites. I'm currently doing the L7 solicitor apprenticeship AMA
hi this may be a stupid question but I'm trying to do my research and not sure if you may know but I'm going to ask anyways.
I want to be a medical neglicence lawyer, I have a few questions to ask.

Should I do uni or apprenticeship?
In your experience why did you choose to do an apprenticeship instead of uni?
What are the advantages of doing an apprenticeship instead of uni?
Do you think it is benefiicial to specialize in this area of law?
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s0phiec
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(Original post by yotsr123)
hi this may be a stupid question but I'm trying to do my research and not sure if you may know but I'm going to ask anyways.
I want to be a medical neglicence lawyer, I have a few questions to ask.

Should I do uni or apprenticeship?
In your experience why did you choose to do an apprenticeship instead of uni?
What are the advantages of doing an apprenticeship instead of uni?
Do you think it is benefiicial to specialize in this area of law?
Hello -

Disclaimer: this is just my personal opinion - I'm not a law expert, careers adviser or anything of the sort.

I would say that if you want to do medical negligence, it wouldn't matter whether you do an apprenticeship or go to university as long as the law firm at which you train has a department that does medical negligence work so you can qualify into it or apply to another firm after qualifying after having done a seat in it during your training contract. If you're thinking of going to university, doing a degree related to what you want to specialise in and then taking the GDL might be an option depending on how set you are on your choice to specialise in said area and how long you want to spend studying and so on.

I chose to do an apprenticeship so I could have a guaranteed route to qualification and my foot in the door, all my training and qualifications including books etc paid for, earn a salary, have four years of extra practical experience as well as a law degree and zero debt. I think my reasons for doing an apprenticeship are pretty universal and so speak for themselves as to advantages of doing an apprenticeship instead of uni. If you live in or around London, you could attend the law apprenticeships conference at BPP University and ask the law firm reps and apprentices some questions.

Again, I can't tell you what you should do but I personally wouldn't be set on a certain specialisation before having fully experienced the department as well as other departments as sometimes expectations don't match the reality. I'm not incredibly familiar with all the law firms out there doing medical negligence but I think Hempsons does health and social care law including medical negligence because I know somebody who trained there. Do more research and think about how you would like to spend your route to qualification as the apprenticeship route is definitely not for everyone. For example, whilst people at uni full-time have several months of summer to enjoy, solicitor apprentices work through it unless they book a few weeks of leave.


I have just made an Official Solicitor Apprenticeships Thread with fcmcmurray that is currently being reviewed so you and others can direct your questions to a more centralised space! :-)
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