DSM or ICD? Watch

Arran90
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In psychiatry and mental health one has a choice of using DSM or ICD. DSM is American whereas ICD is used for the provision of services in Britain and most other countries apart from the US.

Are there any instances where DSM is preferred or overwhelmingly used over ICD in Britain and other countries apart from the US?

Why would British people from the psychiatry and mental health communities want to use DSM rather than ICD?
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Arran90
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Any answers?
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black tea
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(Original post by Arran90)
In psychiatry and mental health one has a choice of using DSM or ICD. DSM is American whereas ICD is used for the provision of services in Britain and most other countries apart from the US.

Are there any instances where DSM is preferred or overwhelmingly used over ICD in Britain and other countries apart from the US?

Why would British people from the psychiatry and mental health communities want to use DSM rather than ICD?
DSM is usually used in research
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Arran90
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(Original post by black tea)
DSM is usually used in research
What is the reason for using / preferring DSM rather than ICD in research?
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black tea
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(Original post by Arran90)
What is the reason for using / preferring DSM rather than ICD in research?
To standardise things. I assume it's because the US use it and most research on mental health comes from there.
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Arran90
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(Original post by black tea)
To standardise things. I assume it's because the US use it and most research on mental health comes from there.
Does the US effectively hold the rest of the world to ransom when it comes to mental health and psychiatry? If there are differences between ICD (international) and DSM (American) concerning a condition then does the US almost always win out?
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black tea
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(Original post by Arran90)
Does the US effectively hold the rest of the world to ransom when it comes to mental health and psychiatry? If there are differences between ICD (international) and DSM (American) concerning a condition then does the US almost always win out?
Erm... I'm not sure, probably lol. I think the ICD and the DSM are pretty similar, tbh.
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Arran90
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(Original post by black tea)
Erm... I'm not sure, probably lol. I think the ICD and the DSM are pretty similar, tbh.
There are similarities but also differences.

ICD-10 actually does exist in the US and it was adopted in 2015. The UK adopted it in 1995 just one year after it came out.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/b...out-the-icd-10
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black tea
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(Original post by Arran90)
There are similarities but also differences.

ICD-10 actually does exist in the US and it was adopted in 2015. The UK adopted it in 1995 just one year after it came out.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/b...out-the-icd-10
Yes, it's "international classification" so it exists in the whole world. It also covers all diseases, not just mental illness.
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Arran90
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(Original post by black tea)
Yes, it's "international classification" so it exists in the whole world. It also covers all diseases, not just mental illness.
So if the (American) DSM is preferred for research rather than the (international) ICD then it comes across that just ONE solitary nation out of over 200 sovereign nations is effectively dictating diagnostic criteria for research. I find the consequence of this highly questionable.

Has it got anything to do with many of the most prestigious academic journals in psychiatry and mental health being American? Something I know from engineering is that non-Americans who publish articles in American engineering journals are forced to use American spellings, American terminology, and quote and reference American technical standards rather than non-American technical standards, by the editorial board. Therefore, does a similar situation take place amongst editorial boards of American psychiatry and mental health journals that dictate that authors use DSM rather than ICD?
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Sinatrafan
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The ICD 10 is actually quite outdated (its a 1994 publication) and the ICD 11 is imminent which should close the gap between the ICD and the DSM somewhat. It is true that the DSM is heavily used in American and psychological research, but more global mental health research will often use the ICD as that is the WHO's official diagnostic manual.

In regards to the UK, mental health trusts code conditions using the ICD 10 which is in effect how they get paid, so there is a strong incentive to use ICD diagnoses in a clinical setting.

The reality is as a clinician you can pick and choose to a certain extent. The DSM for example is much more clear and descriptive on personality disorders which a lot of people prefer and we use commonly use DSM only diagoses like the distinction between bipolar I and bipolar II.

Whilst some niche conditions may exist in the DSM and not be present in the ICD, for the majority of major conditions there isn't too great of a difference.
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