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What is more beneficial in life English or Maths? watch

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    In my opinion, i'd say English because before you are taught multiplication and basic addition or just numbers itself you are first taught English. Its a skill we will use our entire lifetimes. I think English should be compulsory at A Level.
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    Up to GCSE level, id say they are both equally important.
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    English until gcse level then maths beyond that
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    Having compulsory a levels would kinda defeat the point and deter a lot of people from sixth form, not to mention make students struggle who need 3 STEM subjects for uni.
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    As useful as much as you plan to use it.

    For most people, for academic purposes and for employment (graduate) purposes, English is only useful until GCSE, and Maths is useful all the time beyond that.
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    (Original post by MissCarter786)
    In my opinion, i'd say English because before you are taught multiplication and basic addition or just numbers itself you are first taught English. Its a skill we will use our entire lifetimes. I think English should be compulsory at A Level.
    I disagree that it should be compulsory at a-level.
    Although its an important subject, not everyone is good at it. If its compulsory, some people will do badly at it, where the time could be better spent doing a different subject that they would do better in. It would also be a waste of a choice, and would block up 1 of their subjects, which could be better used for a different subject which would be more relevant to their future plans.
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    maff is good to make you're brane work propaly.
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    like wot is employa wont

    i) somwun who is alwaze resyte poem'z and be grammer narzi

    ii) somwyn who has mad arifmetik skil and be like "madam todaey it is bye two cake's for pryce of thrie wot a bargin"
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    No. It should never be compulsory. That would put off a lot of people.
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    In my experience maths is more useful for getting the job done. But in the real world having a very good grasp of english does a lot more for your career than maths (Meetings, negotiations, interviews, Emails, Managing people, Writing contracts, Presentations etc....). Being good at maths is like nice you did the required job but is that it?
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    Grammar, spelling and punctuation are important, but what they teach you in the gcse is (mostly) pointless (over analysing texts/PEEL paragraphs)
    Some aspects of maths are useful. However, on the whole, people can get by with just BIDMAS and percentages.

    It all depends on what profession you are wanting to go into. :thumbsup:
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    Sadly, it's probably English - practising your written expression is far more important to people who don't want to pursue Mathsy stuff at A-level and beyond.

    However, that's not to say that the subject matter of an English Lit or Lang course is even remotely interesting or relevant to most of the student population. The course offers next-to-no real "hard" knowledge.
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    How will being good at analysing books and structure used in fiction ever help in life. Up until gcse english is ok but after that it will not get you anywhere in life.
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    Why should it be compulsory at A level when kids can speak fluent English by the time they reach Junior school? Likewise with maths - I can't remember the last time I used algebra or needed BODMAS in a real life situation.

    If anything, both are important, but what's taught within them as the curriculum needs a serious looking at. Perhaps instead of looking at stuff you'll forget by the time you're 20, stuff like every aspect of how your body works in science; communication, negotiation, job applications and CVs in English; and financial management, the world of banking and finance, renting vs buying in maths. GCSEs qualify you for further education or a low-skilled job, in most cases, and don't really prepare you for life as an adult, yet we spend our entire childhood preparing to pass them, only to never use half the information we've learned. It's essentially a 12 year course in developing the ability to memorise new information.
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    (Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
    Why should it be compulsory at A level when kids can speak fluent English by the time they reach Junior school? Likewise with maths - I can't remember the last time I used algebra or needed BODMAS in a real life situation.

    If anything, both are important, but what's taught within them as the curriculum needs a serious looking at. Perhaps instead of looking at stuff you'll forget by the time you're 20, stuff like every aspect of how your body works in science; communication, negotiation, job applications and CVs in English; and financial management, the world of banking and finance, renting vs buying in maths. GCSEs qualify you for further education or a low-skilled job, in most cases, and don't really prepare you for life as an adult, yet we spend our entire childhood preparing to pass them, only to never use half the information we've learned. It's essentially a 12 year course in developing the ability to memorise new information.
    Studying maths at any level enhances logic, reasoning and problem solving skills (as well as the obvious mathematical skills) that are so useful in life/career. That’s why qualifications in maths are regarded so highly by employers, even if the job is not related in any way to maths. I agree that there should be more finance but I wouldn’t want the syllabus to be dumbed down.

    Of course it shouldn’t be compulsory at A Level though.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    Studying maths at any level enhances logic, reasoning and problem solving skills (as well as the obvious mathematical skills) that are so useful in life/career. That’s why qualifications in maths are regarded so highly by employers, even if the job is not related in any way to maths. I agree that there should be more finance but I wouldn’t want the syllabus to be dumbed down.

    Of course it shouldn’t be compulsory at A Level though.
    Changing the syllabus to be more applicable to real life wouldn't be dumbing it down, though. If it was that simple then we wouldn't have such an alarming number of people who can't seem to manage their own finances properly. It's not the fact that what's specifically learned is compulsory in developing problem solving skills, as again there are ways of teaching this that are far more applicable to real life. Employers like people with qualifications in maths, because this suggests intelligence, and with a solid curriculum more applicable to real world adulthood, this will never change.
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    I think it depends on what you want to do with your life, to be honest. For example, English will be far more beneficial for someone who wants to go into journalism. In contrast, maths will benefit someone who wants to become an account more. Also I don't think any subject should be compulsory at A-Level.
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    (Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
    Changing the syllabus to be more applicable to real life wouldn't be dumbing it down, though. If it was that simple then we wouldn't have such an alarming number of people who can't seem to manage their own finances properly. It's not the fact that what's specifically learned is compulsory in developing problem solving skills, as again there are ways of teaching this that are far more applicable to real life. Employers like people with qualifications in maths, because this suggests intelligence, and with a solid curriculum more applicable to real world adulthood, this will never change.
    Adding too much finance would mean there would have to be less algebra/geometry/statistics/probability/other number work and also fewer “hard” topics. All of them are so important in different ways for enhancing the skills I mentioned above. I’m happy with the variety that is currently in the GCSE syllabus.

    I think other real life stuff e.g. tax, mortgages, managing money etc. should be taught separately because the maths they require is basic compared to some of the more advanced topics taught at GCSE.
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    (Original post by Notnek)
    I think other real life stuff e.g. tax, mortgages, managing money etc. should be taught separately because the maths they require is basic compared to some of the more advanced topics taught at GCSE.
    Should there be separate "life skills" courses that teach that stuff, allowing maths (and English) courses to be more focused on the academic side?
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    As an English student taking both English language and English literature at A-level, I'd have to humbly say mathematics. Both are very useful, but you'll probably be able to do more with mathematics in the future than with English.
 
 
 
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