Please someone mark my inspector calls essay

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MxRie2
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Some background info:

I am really struggling with English- a 9 just seems out of reach could someone please give me advice, I am currently predicted a 6/7


Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout to express his desire for education for women. Priestley presents Sheila as educated. Sheila “moves closer to the inspector”, Priestley employs this stage direction to present Sheila’s eagerness to learn more about socialism and responsibility through her body language. Alternatively, the stage direction could metaphorically present how Sheila’s views are moving “closer” to the inspector. Nevertheless Sheila’s eagerness to learn presents the idea that Priestley believes that women can be intellectual counterparts to men; Sheila is intellectually matched with the inspector. Furthermore, Sheila expresses a desire for the family to “share their guilt”. Sheila acts as a parallel to the inspector. Sheila has reformed her behaviour and is presented as a quick learner as she has responded to the inspector’s message positively. Priestley employs us and we language as Sheila tells her family that “we’ll have to share our guilt”. This idea would have resonated with the audience; Priestley’s audience would have lived through both wars and as community and alliances were important to winning both wars the idea of community promoted by Priestley would be striking to the audience. The audience would have recognised that Sheila’s views on community are right and would have established her as an intelligent character. Priestley invites the reader to observe Sheila’s changes as she becomes more educated. At the beginning of the play, Mrs Birling scolds Sheila like a child telling her not to “tease” Eric. However we see a role reversal as Sheila orders her mother to “stop” talking after she realises that Eric is the father of Eva’s unborn child. Priestley employs this dramatic device to emphasise that now Sheila is an educated woman she is superior to her mother. Furthermore the imperative “stop” coupled with the full stop conveys a sense of authority. In the 20th century women were not as educated as men therefore through Sheila Priestley criticises the education system and calls for a reformation in the system.

Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to present his ideas on independence for women. Sheila asks Gerald where he has been all summer “half playfully” as well as “half seriously”. The adverb “seriously” in the stage directions presents the idea that Sheila suspects that Gerald has been unfaithful. Priestley presents Sheila as breaking social conventions as women were not supposed to accuse their husbands of being unfaithful. Priestley foreshadows Sheila’s change into an independent woman. The adverb “playfully “suggests that Sheila feels that she has to tolerate his infidelity as a woman. Priestley explores and criticises the lack of independence women have through Sheila’s relationship with Gerald. Priestley presents a dramatic change in Sheila as she “hands him back the ring”. We see a striking contrast in Sheila’s behaviour. When Sheila received the ring she described it as “wonderful”. The fragmented sentence peppered with many dashes conveys her shock and excitement; Priestley presents the upper class as easily bought and materialistic. The act of handing “back the ring” is significant; Priestley uses this as a metaphor to present Sheila as rejecting materialism and accepting socialism. Priestley uses Sheila as an example ans urges the audience to reject materialism and capitalism. Furthermore Priestley presents Sheila as an independent woman as she arguably defies social conventions and undermines Gerald’s masculinity by handing him back the ring. Priestley therefore foreshadows the beginning of the suffragette movement which began shortly after WW1. Priestley calls for greater independence for women.


Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to express his disapproval of the upbringing in bourgeois society. Priestley presents this through the name “Sheila”. “Sheila” derives from the Gaelic name Cecelia meaning blind and is a homonym for “shield her”. The audience is immediately made aware of her naivety through her name. Priestley criticises the upper class as indoctrinating their children with Bourgeois consumerism and presents this as a catalyst to the spread of capitalism. Furthermore, in the opening stage direction Sheila is describes as “very pleased with life”. Interestingly both Sheila and Eric, the children are introduced last. This presents the social hierarchy within upper class families. Priestly criticises the upper class for valuing materialism more than their own children. Sheila is “very pleased with life” presenting the idea that she is blind to the suffering of others around her for example Edna. Priestley presents Sheila as self-centred through her myopic view of life. Priestley presents this attitude as instilled in her from birth – it is arguably not her fault but the fault of her parents. Priestley presents a change in Sheila, Sheila warns her parents that “you’ll see”, the repetition of “you’ll see” emphasises that Sheila has now become enlightened. Priestley tries to appeal to the younger generation who are more “impressionable” to change their ways for the sake of future generations. The phrase “you’ll see” consolidates the recurring motif of sight which is prevalent throughout the play- Priestley presents socialism as superior to capitalist ideology instilled by parents from birth and urges the audience to leave being aware of society around them.


Lastly, Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to urge the audience to be more responsible. Sheila is presented as immature at the beginning of the play. Sheila refers to Mrs Birling as “mummy”. Priestley employs child like colloquialisms to heighten her immaturity. This idea is further reinforced as she “laughs hysterically” after learning of Gerald’s unfaithfulness. The adverb “hysterically” connotes to a lack of self control and silliness further emphasising her immature and irresponsible nature. Furthermore, Priestley presents Sheila as irresponsible as she is guilty of one of the seven deadly sins- jealousy. Sheila misuses her power and threatens to “close her account” as she felt insecure and threatened by Eva’s beauty. As “an inspector calls” is a morality play Priestley invites the audience to judge the characters so they too may identify similar traits they have with the characters so they can change and fix them. Priestley presents Sheila’s change from a jealous immature and irresponsible girl to a responsible woman to express his desire for his audience, and to extend this idea, wider society to be responsible
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thaxaos
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Top class, not economy not business
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MxRie2
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Thanks 🙏 if anyone has done the gcse or does do a level English I would really appreciate some advice
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alesiaa.xox
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Very good response, very good use of language
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MxRie2
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(Original post by alesiaa.xox)
Very good response, very good use of language
Thanks 🙏
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sqrt of 5
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(Original post by PXRPLE)
Some background info:

I am really struggling with English- a 9 just seems out of reach could someone please give me advice, I am currently predicted a 6/7


Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout to express his desire for education for women. Priestley presents Sheila as educated. Sheila “moves closer to the inspector”, Priestley employs this stage direction to present Sheila’s eagerness to learn more about socialism and responsibility through her body language. Alternatively, the stage direction could metaphorically present how Sheila’s views are moving “closer” to the inspector. Nevertheless Sheila’s eagerness to learn presents the idea that Priestley believes that women can be intellectual counterparts to men; Sheila is intellectually matched with the inspector. Furthermore, Sheila expresses a desire for the family to “share their guilt”. Sheila acts as a parallel to the inspector. Sheila has reformed her behaviour and is presented as a quick learner as she has responded to the inspector’s message positively. Priestley employs us and we language as Sheila tells her family that “we’ll have to share our guilt”. This idea would have resonated with the audience; Priestley’s audience would have lived through both wars and as community and alliances were important to winning both wars the idea of community promoted by Priestley would be striking to the audience. The audience would have recognised that Sheila’s views on community are right and would have established her as an intelligent character. Priestley invites the reader to observe Sheila’s changes as she becomes more educated. At the beginning of the play, Mrs Birling scolds Sheila like a child telling her not to “tease” Eric. However we see a role reversal as Sheila orders her mother to “stop” talking after she realises that Eric is the father of Eva’s unborn child. Priestley employs this dramatic device to emphasise that now Sheila is an educated woman she is superior to her mother. Furthermore the imperative “stop” coupled with the full stop conveys a sense of authority. In the 20th century women were not as educated as men therefore through Sheila Priestley criticises the education system and calls for a reformation in the system.

Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to present his ideas on independence for women. Sheila asks Gerald where he has been all summer “half playfully” as well as “half seriously”. The adverb “seriously” in the stage directions presents the idea that Sheila suspects that Gerald has been unfaithful. Priestley presents Sheila as breaking social conventions as women were not supposed to accuse their husbands of being unfaithful. Priestley foreshadows Sheila’s change into an independent woman. The adverb “playfully “suggests that Sheila feels that she has to tolerate his infidelity as a woman. Priestley explores and criticises the lack of independence women have through Sheila’s relationship with Gerald. Priestley presents a dramatic change in Sheila as she “hands him back the ring”. We see a striking contrast in Sheila’s behaviour. When Sheila received the ring she described it as “wonderful”. The fragmented sentence peppered with many dashes conveys her shock and excitement; Priestley presents the upper class as easily bought and materialistic. The act of handing “back the ring” is significant; Priestley uses this as a metaphor to present Sheila as rejecting materialism and accepting socialism. Priestley uses Sheila as an example ans urges the audience to reject materialism and capitalism. Furthermore Priestley presents Sheila as an independent woman as she arguably defies social conventions and undermines Gerald’s masculinity by handing him back the ring. Priestley therefore foreshadows the beginning of the suffragette movement which began shortly after WW1. Priestley calls for greater independence for women.


Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to express his disapproval of the upbringing in bourgeois society. Priestley presents this through the name “Sheila”. “Sheila” derives from the Gaelic name Cecelia meaning blind and is a homonym for “shield her”. The audience is immediately made aware of her naivety through her name. Priestley criticises the upper class as indoctrinating their children with Bourgeois consumerism and presents this as a catalyst to the spread of capitalism. Furthermore, in the opening stage direction Sheila is describes as “very pleased with life”. Interestingly both Sheila and Eric, the children are introduced last. This presents the social hierarchy within upper class families. Priestly criticises the upper class for valuing materialism more than their own children. Sheila is “very pleased with life” presenting the idea that she is blind to the suffering of others around her for example Edna. Priestley presents Sheila as self-centred through her myopic view of life. Priestley presents this attitude as instilled in her from birth – it is arguably not her fault but the fault of her parents. Priestley presents a change in Sheila, Sheila warns her parents that “you’ll see”, the repetition of “you’ll see” emphasises that Sheila has now become enlightened. Priestley tries to appeal to the younger generation who are more “impressionable” to change their ways for the sake of future generations. The phrase “you’ll see” consolidates the recurring motif of sight which is prevalent throughout the play- Priestley presents socialism as superior to capitalist ideology instilled by parents from birth and urges the audience to leave being aware of society around them.


Lastly, Priestley uses Sheila’s change throughout the play to urge the audience to be more responsible. Sheila is presented as immature at the beginning of the play. Sheila refers to Mrs Birling as “mummy”. Priestley employs child like colloquialisms to heighten her immaturity. This idea is further reinforced as she “laughs hysterically” after learning of Gerald’s unfaithfulness. The adverb “hysterically” connotes to a lack of self control and silliness further emphasising her immature and irresponsible nature. Furthermore, Priestley presents Sheila as irresponsible as she is guilty of one of the seven deadly sins- jealousy. Sheila misuses her power and threatens to “close her account” as she felt insecure and threatened by Eva’s beauty. As “an inspector calls” is a morality play Priestley invites the audience to judge the characters so they too may identify similar traits they have with the characters so they can change and fix them. Priestley presents Sheila’s change from a jealous immature and irresponsible girl to a responsible woman to express his desire for his audience, and to extend this idea, wider society to be responsible
I'm just a normal student but I'm working on a grade 9 so here are a few tips:
1) You used Priestley's name TOO much. Literally, it appears everywhere.
2) You invented a quote. Therefore part of your essay is not actually true (it's "half playful half serious"
3) You need to explore Priestley's method in more depth. Sometimes you do it, others you just mention it ("Priestly criticises the upper class for valuing materialism more than their own children." How could you take this a step further?)
4) You need to talk about the audience. You did it in the first, third and last paragraph but not the second one.
5) You missed out probably the most important message that Priestley wanted to convey through this play: Priestley uses Sheila as a construct in order to show how the younger generation will change Britain into a more socialist country, whilst the older generation will never learn the lesson of social responsibility.
6) You need to talk about SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY!

Although there are a few mistakes, you gave an alternative view on a quote, which is good, you mentioned Priestley's message throughout the play and you used a variety of quotes. Not gonna lie the fourth paragraph is superb!

p.s use this channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEB...Vk9SxHBIGhrY3w if you are struggling with english
Last edited by sqrt of 5; 1 year ago
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MxRie2
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(Original post by sqrt of 5)
I'm just a normal student but I'm working on a grade 9 so here are a few tips:
1) You used Priestley's name TOO much. Literally, it appears everywhere.
2) You invented a quote. Therefore part of your essay is not actually true (it's "half playful half serious"
3) You need to explore Priestley's method in more depth. Sometimes you do it, others you just mention it ("Priestly criticises the upper class for valuing materialism more than their own children." How could you take this a step further?)
4) You need to talk about the audience. You did it in the first, third and last paragraph but not the second one.
5) You missed out probably the most important message that Priestley wanted to convey through this play: Priestley uses Sheila as a construct in order to show how the younger generation will change Britain into a more socialist country, whilst the older generation will never learn the lesson of social responsibility.
6) You need to talk about SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY!

Although there are a few mistakes, you gave an alternative view on a quote, which is good, you mentioned Priestley's message throughout the play and you used a variety of quotes. Not gonna lie the fourth paragraph is superb!

p.s use this channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEB...Vk9SxHBIGhrY3w if you are struggling with english
Thank you so much this is so useful🙏
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Merry Xmas 2k19
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I fail my english
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Themysticalegg
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I have no recollection of my English GCSE essays but that was far better than anything I ever wrote. Flowed beautifully and a good essay!
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ArthurGreaney1
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very good
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