Why do people pick the wrong a levels in your opinion? Watch

AngelStarfire
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#21
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I'd also like to know from anyone who is doing/did Economics, German and Maths.
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1000TimesOver
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#22
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Probably because of parents interfering. Or picking a subject because they think it will suit their career as opposed to being a subject they like. Also maybe because of a lack of knowledge of the subject, like I know some people who instantly assumed they would love a subject without not actually looking into what it will be like or how much the subject demanded.
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enigmatic17
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(Original post by AngelStarfire)
I'd also like to know from anyone who is doing/did Economics, German and Maths.
i take maths, AS is good and easy I would say but brooo A2 is hell on earth not even kidding I'm dying with A2 and i still haven't passed a single test for A2 although for AS i pretty much score well so best of luck with that
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enigmatic17
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(Original post by Anthos)
I'm worried about picking A level options too. People make out the gap between GCSE and A levels to be enormous, so that makes me nervous a bit. At GCSE, I enjoy or am good at English Language/Literature, History, and French, which is why I'm considering taking those subjects. If anyone reading this post has taken either Eng Lang/Lit, History, or French at A level, I'd like to know your experiences, and how did you find it compared to GCSE (was the gap _really_ big?).
there is a big chance from GCSE to A level for every subject.
i know people who have taken literature and language in Alevel and they say its nothing like GCSE
i know people who have taken physics and they say its the worst one to chose in Alevel
i take maths, bio, chem and i know how it feels
cant even tell u which one is easier and which one is harder, they are all difficult in their own way
and its nothing like the sciences or maths we had in GCSE seriously nothing like that at all,its entirely different
not trying to scare u but thats the bitter truth about Alevels
i wish u best of luck
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ltsmith
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mainly because lots of us got poor advice from underfunded career advisors.

i had to take a gap year because of it
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dancesingact
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#26
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because of the stupid outdated opinion that there are "soft" alevels
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CloudySkies238
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(Original post by Anthos)
I'm worried about picking A level options too. People make out the gap between GCSE and A levels to be enormous, so that makes me nervous a bit. At GCSE, I enjoy or am good at English Language/Literature, History, and French, which is why I'm considering taking those subjects. If anyone reading this post has taken either Eng Lang/Lit, History, or French at A level, I'd like to know your experiences, and how did you find it compared to GCSE (was the gap _really_ big?).
Hey. I'm in Year 12 and currently doing AS English Lit - the gap is quite big as we've already finished one book (took us about 12 weeks to do.) Even though it is different from GCSE I wouldn't say it's not manageable. For instance, I got a 7 in it as GCSE and I'm currently working at a C after 2 essays. I don't do language but from what I've heard from my friends, it's a big step up this is because they study accents and dialect. They've also studied how the language between female and males differ.
I know 2 people who got 9's in French and they are finding french quite easy really. The only thing that's changed is the weekly speaking they have to do compared to just one speaking lesson once every blue moon at GCSE,
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
In my case, I chose subjects I either needed for my university course (I already knew which degree I wanted to pursue) or enjoyed a lot at GCSE.

For me, 2 out of the 4 A levels I chose were not the right fit for me, for a variety of reasons. Chemistry was mis-sold to me by the teachers, who were adamant that it wasn't a huge leap in difficulty from GCSE to A level; I ended up dropping it after about 3 weeks. I also didn't enjoy Human Biology, mainly because it was very poorly taught, and it was very much a case of learning how to answer the exam questions in the right way, rather than applying knowledge. I needed that subject for my degree though, so I just had to stick with it.

I think it's a balancing act between picking subjects you're interested in, subjects you need for a future career, and subjects you can excel in. The latter I think is the hardest to gauge, as it's so dependent on teaching quality and being accurately informed of the structure/content before picking that subject.
I think that can be a more common problem than people think.
It happens in quite a few schools- teachers miss selling a subject. It can happen for quite a few reasons, one reason being that they want pupils to study it (especially if they teach that subject). Sometimes they are a bit mis informed themselves.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by 1000TimesOver)
Probably because of parents interfering. Or picking a subject because they think it will suit their career as opposed to being a subject they like. Also maybe because of a lack of knowledge of the subject, like I know some people who instantly assumed they would love a subject without not actually looking into what it will be like or how much the subject demanded.
I agree- quite a few take a subject because their parents want them to pick it.
Thats why i chose ICT.
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tazarooni89
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A lot of people choose their A-Levels aiming to get onto a particular university course, aimed at securing a particular career (e.g. people choosing Chemistry and Biology because they really want to do Medicine). And then it turns out that they aren't actually any good at those subjects, which doesn't bode well for going into a degree and/or career that heavily depends on them.
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Arran90
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One problem not mentioned is artificially 'balancing out' A Levels where humanities and arts students feel compelled to take a STEM subject or vice versa simply to show others that they can use both sides of their brain but they dislike or struggle with the subject and also have a less than compatible selection of A Levels.
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gullkatt
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#32
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(Original post by Anthos)
I'm worried about picking A level options too. People make out the gap between GCSE and A levels to be enormous, so that makes me nervous a bit. At GCSE, I enjoy or am good at English Language/Literature, History, and French, which is why I'm considering taking those subjects. If anyone reading this post has taken either Eng Lang/Lit, History, or French at A level, I'd like to know your experiences, and how did you find it compared to GCSE (was the gap _really_ big?).
I'm taking English Lit, languages and RS for my A-Levels and I have to say that for me the jump between GCSE and A Level for English Lit was minimal, I mean not completely but much less than it has been for languages A-Levels. I think it depends on how well you studied French for GCSE, the grammar content as well as knowing a solid portion of vocabulary. The content in itself is not massively difficult, just some new grammar structures and you have to be more consistent. As long as you work hard and are passionate about the subject (passion matters A LOT for languages A Level: I have no passion for Spanish, which makes it much more difficult for me than French, whereas my friend is the exact opposite) then I'm sure you will be more than capable. Good luck!
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Arrius
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#33
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I did it twice picking up wrong A levels. I lost so much valuable time by selecting classes I was not really good at.

I wasted a year because of this mistake which I will surely not repeat again but yea it is important to get some advice and discuss these matters with some experienced people. That is one of the reasons I started reading these forums.
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SJW-
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imo if ur not planning to go to uni a levels are a waste of time and all abit alienating. here i am studying a level english. for what? for what exactly? no value to me or employer. so ppl dropped out like flies. only 5 of us out of 35 or so from schoo got to the end. 30 ppl dead
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Aishraat
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
I received A*'s in all the sciences and I knew I wanted to be a doctor but so I chose subjects in order to become one to be honest I didn't enjoy science that much at GCSE I thought the syllabus was quite boring I always found humanities more straight forward but I wanted to be a doctor so I chose the science route.The only subject which I enjoy is biology to be honest.I feel no motivation what so ever and am struggling to finish my second year.I just want it to be all over.I feel trapped in the a level route and I don't know what I want to do with my life as I just wanted to be a doctor and I can't do that with the grades I am predicted and have been getting.I feel incredibly ashamed of myself and deeply embarassed.
Do you still want to be a doctor? If so use that as motivation for the subjects you are studying, that the end goal for you is to become a doctor. If you keep the motivation up (watch YouTube videos on how to end procrastination and all sorts of stuff you may be struggling with, there is always a solution) you will succeed and could change your grades in a matter of weeks depending on how far behind you may be.

Also, you have time to pull it out of the bag. Use cgp revision guides and learn how to revise actively not passively (using YouTube and google). Aim to get good grades put that hard work in now because later you may regret it and it may close some doors should you not get C’s or above. Xx
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Simbasoul
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
For me it was not knowing what I signed up for I didn't really know what to expect of each subject and how hard it was going to be.Another thing is the big gap between GCSE's and A levels what I mean by this is that you could get A/A*'s in your GCSE's but the gap in some subjects is so big that you are not ready for a levels.
Because well meaning people give duff advice. Parents, family and friends mean well but do not always advise correctly in what is needed for future careers - unfortunately, the government in their wisdom, about 10 years ago, dismantled the independent careers service that went into every school and decided that teachers etc could do that as well - they can't.

Teachers are great at teaching their subjects - they know what has to be done to get various grades, but, ultimately, come the end of GCSEs, they know that it is a competition to get you to choose their subject at A level - their very job depends on you choosing their subject at A level, which means that at the 6th form Open Days, they are marketing the subject in the best possible light to you. The jump is big from GCSEs to A levels (although the new 1-9 grades are minimising that jump a bit) and they are much, much harder. They are also a lot less spoon fed, so you have to learn how to learn in a different way.
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Aishraat
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(Original post by Arran90)
One problem not mentioned is artificially 'balancing out' A Levels where humanities and arts students feel compelled to take a STEM subject or vice versa simply to show others that they can use both sides of their brain but they dislike or struggle with the subject and also have a less than compatible selection of A Levels.
I did AS levels in Psychology, English lang and lit combined, maths, chemistry, physics and biology and came out with E, D, C, E, D, C and I was warned about taking psychology and English lang and lit with maths because of the different skills needed for these subjects but I didn’t listen to the advice and stuck with what I wanted to originally do. I don’t know if I regret it. I don’t know if that choice affected my grades because I got the exact same grades the year before and I got grades ranging from A-E in all of my subjects in internal assignments, but I get your point. Having to do a stem subject and a humanities subject really takes a toll on you and is arguably more difficult due to the fact that you are using both sides of your brain x
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Aishraat
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(Original post by CloudySkies238)
Hey. I'm in Year 12 and currently doing AS English Lit - the gap is quite big as we've already finished one book (took us about 12 weeks to do.) Even though it is different from GCSE I wouldn't say it's not manageable. For instance, I got a 7 in it as GCSE and I'm currently working at a C after 2 essays. I don't do language but from what I've heard from my friends, it's a big step up this is because they study accents and dialect. They've also studied how the language between female and males differ.
I know 2 people who got 9's in French and they are finding french quite easy really. The only thing that's changed is the weekly speaking they have to do compared to just one speaking lesson once every blue moon at GCSE,
I think if at GCSE if you go beyond the syllabus you find A levels easier depending on how far from the syllabus you have gone and how much additional information you have learnt that has stayed with you. I think if you just do what the syllabus asks of you then the step to A levels is more difficult. I think your friends who find french easier probably did more work at gcse than was required of them by the syllabus. Or it may also have something to do with intellect but hard work most of the time pays off. X
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CloudySkies238
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(Original post by Aishraat)
I think if at GCSE if you go beyond the syllabus you find A levels easier depending on how far from the syllabus you have gone and how much additional information you have learnt that has stayed with you. I think if you just do what the syllabus asks of you then the step to A levels is more difficult. I think your friends who find french easier probably did more work at gcse than was required of them by the syllabus. Or it may also have something to do with intellect but hard work most of the time pays off. X
Completely agree - the pair did go above and beyond with language learning. Furthermore, they did just 'click' with languages if you get me lol
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