Mr Optimist
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I am interested to know the thoughts of medical students and doctors on this. I am aware that people from all ages can do medicine and succeed but I want to hear from people that started medicine at a later age what they think were the difficulties and also the pros regarding doing a medicine degree at an older age. Obviously, the older students are more likely to have children so that could have made things harder, so if it makes the discussion easier, we don't need to mention the children factor.
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Hype en Ecosse
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Not done it myself - but know lots of current junior doctors who started later in their careers - some from nursing; some from other fields completely. None of them regret it. I think being at uni can be a little more isolating because you don't identify much with your younger peers - but hopefully by that age you have a lot more interests to fulfil you than "top bants" init. Once you start work the playing field pretty much evens out again and you spend a lot of time with your colleagues and seem to enjoy it.

Also know one consultant who worked in his field for a couple of decades, retired, then came out of retirement to re-train as a GP. Which means being an SHO again for a little while!!!
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TomSmith12345
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Hey! I'm in undergrad medicine (I'm 19) and there are plenty of mature students in our course! I imagine graduate entry is full of more mature people so I wouldn't stress at all
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wl1
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(Original post by Mr Optimist)
I am interested to know the thoughts of medical students and doctors on this. I am aware that people from all ages can do medicine and succeed but I want to hear from people that started medicine at a later age what they think were the difficulties and also the pros regarding doing a medicine degree at an older age. Obviously, the older students are more likely to have children so that could have made things harder, so if it makes the discussion easier, we don't need to mention the children factor.
I'm 28 and I'm in the 2nd year of a 5 year course. There are a decent number of other grads and mature students in my year.

The main difficulty for me was going from having a job and disposable income to having to be careful with money. The degree itself is also fairly intense so it took me a while to get back into full time education and being able to study efficiently.

Pros are you get to do the job you want. You'll get a good 20-30 year career out of it if you want.
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Mr Optimist
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(Original post by wl1)
I'm 28 and I'm in the 2nd year of a 5 year course. There are a decent number of other grads and mature students in my year.

The main difficulty for me was going from having a job and disposable income to having to be careful with money. The degree itself is also fairly intense so it took me a while to get back into full time education and being able to study efficiently.

Pros are you get to do the job you want. You'll get a good 20-30 year career out of it if you want.
Thank you very much for your comment. I am 25 myself and a qualified pharmacist. In theory, I could work as a pharmacist when I study. My main plan however is to own my own business in next 2 years and then use the income from that to help pay for medical school.

I am very happy to see more of my fellow mature students doing medicine
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Mr Optimist
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
Not done it myself - but know lots of current junior doctors who started later in their careers - some from nursing; some from other fields completely. None of them regret it. I think being at uni can be a little more isolating because you don't identify much with your younger peers - but hopefully by that age you have a lot more interests to fulfil you than "top bants" init. Once you start work the playing field pretty much evens out again and you spend a lot of time with your colleagues and seem to enjoy it.

Also know one consultant who worked in his field for a couple of decades, retired, then came out of retirement to re-train as a GP. Which means being an SHO again for a little while!!!
Thank you for your comment. Yes it seems it is actually common to see mature people doing medicine. I was more worried about energy levels and whether an older student would have the energy to tackle the course. But actually it seems the mature students handle the course fine, in part due to their maturity and experience in past degrees.
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Mr Optimist
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(Original post by TomSmith12345)
Hey! I'm in undergrad medicine (I'm 19) and there are plenty of mature students in our course! I imagine graduate entry is full of more mature people so I wouldn't stress at all
Thank you Tom for your reassurance. I wish you all the best in your course, and I hope you ace medical school
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