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Mechanical Properties of Materials and their definitions

In the AQA Design and Technology book, there are two mechanical properties, which sound very similar to me (English is my second language) and I don't know how to differentiate these two, could somebody explain to me what the difference is between these?:

Compressive Strength: Ability to withstand being crushed or shortened by pushing forces (COMPRESSION).

Malleability: Ability to withstand deformation by COMPRESSION without cracking.

Also, I have been given a revision booklet from school and in there the definition for Malleability kind of contradicts the definition from the AQA book: "Ability to BE DEFORMED in all dimensions without failing", where are in AQA book it said that it WITHSTANDS DEFORMATION, so I am thinking it doesn't deform then.
Original post by PonuryWilk
In the AQA Design and Technology book, there are two mechanical properties, which sound very similar to me (English is my second language) and I don't know how to differentiate these two, could somebody explain to me what the difference is between these?:

Compressive Strength: Ability to withstand being crushed or shortened by pushing forces (COMPRESSION).

Malleability: Ability to withstand deformation by COMPRESSION without cracking.

Also, I have been given a revision booklet from school and in there the definition for Malleability kind of contradicts the definition from the AQA book: "Ability to BE DEFORMED in all dimensions without failing", where are in AQA book it said that it WITHSTANDS DEFORMATION, so I am thinking it doesn't deform then.


I can definitely see why this is confusing. Have you covered tensile testing? Compressive strength would typically be the opposite of this, compressing the specimen to see the amount of compressive force it fails at.

Malleability is more usefully, in my opinion, described as a material's ability to be worked, e.g. hammered, pressed, rolled, etc. without breaking. For example, putty is considered to be very malleable, but would have very little compressive strength.
Original post by PonuryWilk
In the AQA Design and Technology book, there are two mechanical properties, which sound very similar to me (English is my second language) and I don't know how to differentiate these two, could somebody explain to me what the difference is between these?:

Compressive Strength: Ability to withstand being crushed or shortened by pushing forces (COMPRESSION).

Malleability: Ability to withstand deformation by COMPRESSION without cracking.

Also, I have been given a revision booklet from school and in there the definition for Malleability kind of contradicts the definition from the AQA book: "Ability to BE DEFORMED in all dimensions without failing", where are in AQA book it said that it WITHSTANDS DEFORMATION, so I am thinking it doesn't deform then.

Compressive strength is the maximum compressive stress that a material can go under before failing, if a material exceeds this value then it will fail and break and cannot take the load anymore.

Malleability is how easily it can deform in a compressive scenario without failing. A greater malleability means that it can be more easily deformed before failure, an example material of high malleability is gold which is easily rolled into nuggets but isn't actually failing. An example low malleability material would be rocks like granite where it would potentially not deform much until it has fractured and failed.

Malleability is similar to ductility but under compressive forces rather than tensile where it is being stretched though some materials won't always be high or low in both characteristics.
Reply 3
Thanks guys!
compression is the ability to WITHSTAND (like stopping it from shortening) whereas malleability is the ability to allow the compression but making sure it doesnt crack but compression is the force that is applied. like playdo it doesnt crack after squished.

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