esrever
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If A and B are two electrically charged point spheres and C is a point between A and B. Electric field field at C due to A is E_A and electric field at C due to B is E_B. What is the resultant electric field at C? Is it E_A + E_B?

What about the resultant electric potential at point C? Is it sum of electric potential due to A and B at C?

Similarly, I have questions regarding this when A and B have mass and when A and B are magnetically charged.
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BobbJo
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(Original post by esrever)
If A and B are two electrically charged point spheres and C is a point between A and B. Electric field field at C due to A is E_A and electric field at C due to B is E_B. What is the resultant electric field at C? Is it E_A + E_B?

What about the resultant electric potential at point C? Is it sum of electric potential due to A and B at C?

Similarly, I have questions regarding this when A and B have mass and when A and B are magnetically charged.
Yes it is the vector sum E_A + E_B.

The electric potential is the sum of potential due to A and B at C.
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esrever
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(Original post by BobbJo)
Yes it is the vector sum E_A + E_B.

The electric potential is the sum of potential due to A and B at C.
Thank you . So if A and B have same sign, the magnitude of field is E_A - E_B and if they have opposite charge, the magnitude of field is E_A + E_B right?
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BobbJo
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(Original post by esrever)
Thank you . So if A and B have same sign, the magnitude of field is E_A - E_B and if they have opposite charge, the magnitude of field is E_A + E_B right?
 E = \dfrac{Q}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 r^2} <r>
I meant to write r hat not <r>, r hat is the unit vector
if Q is negative, E will be negative too
you only need to add them
It is a vector sum
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esrever
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(Original post by BobbJo)
 E = \dfrac{Q}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 r^2} &lt;r&gt;
I meant to write r hat not <r>, r hat is the unit vector
if Q is negative, E will be negative too
you only need to add them
It is a vector sum
That makes sense. Thanks!

I am assuming that if A and B are magnetically charged, magnetic flux density at a point is vector sum of individual magnetic flux densities of A and B at that point. And for magnetic flux, it's just the (scalar) sum.
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BobbJo
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(Original post by esrever)
That makes sense. Thanks!

I am assuming that if A and B are magnetically charged, magnetic flux density at a point is vector sum of individual magnetic flux densities of A and B at that point. And for magnetic flux, it's just the (scalar) sum.
Yes for magnetic flux density

resultant magnetic flux = resultant magnetic flux density x normal area

btw: Magnetic charges do not exist because magnetic monopoles do not exist
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esrever
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(Original post by BobbJo)
Yes for magnetic flux density

resultant magnetic flux = resultant magnetic flux density x normal area
Thank you
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Eimmanuel
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I would not advocate any students in remembering the results mention in post #3.

Note that the following expression should NOT be blindly applied.

 \vec{E} = \dfrac{Q}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 r^2} \hat{r}

Generally, I don’t agree with all the things that mention above especially about the magnetic flux. Magnetic flux is NOT defined at a point.
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golgiapparatus31
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Any field strength just do vector sum like parallelogram of vectors

i) For electric field strength

ii) For gravitational field strength

iii) For magnetic flux density

For magnetic flux, it's the resultant magnetic flux density x area x sin (theta)
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