KateR03
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I am doing the Aeneid for one of my texts and I am struggling with the 10 mark questions (the one that doesn't need quotes). I was wondering if anyone had a model answer, it doesn't matter what text, and explain how to answer them. Ideally -"What impression do we get from...?" and "How does...make the text engaging?".Thanks!
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thrifty_reviser
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(Original post by KateR03)
I am doing the Aeneid for one of my texts and I am struggling with the 10 mark questions (the one that doesn't need quotes). I was wondering if anyone had a model answer, it doesn't matter what text, and explain how to answer them. Ideally -"What impression do we get from...?" and "How does...make the text engaging?".Thanks!
I don't do Aeneid but I do the sights, sounds and seasons of the countryside, a country spring, the town mouse and the country mouse, recipe for happiness and Spring and thoughts of mortality. It might seem a lot but these are a mixture of short poems.

I think a 10 marker would be easier for you as you only have 1 text for your verse section (correct me if I am wrong) whilst typically in 10 markers you would reference a range of texts you have studied in this section.

My teacher told my class that 10 markers have to be:
- balanced (3 points for the statement/ 3 points against the statement)
- No style points are needed (you don't need to talk about literary techniques)
- You don't need exact the Latin quotation, you either remember/memorise the English translation or paraphase the translation in context - paraphrasing could lower your marks though
- You need 6 points in total (You shouldn't have similar points but a range)
- You need to make references to the entirety of the text you have studied and not just the passages on the paper
- You don't need a conclusion but should have 1 concluding sentence at the end summarising your argument.

A typical 10 mark question would look like this:

'The good are rewarded fairly and the bad are punished fairly.' How far do you think this is true in the works of Ovid, Virgil and Plautus you have studied? In your answer you may refer to the passages printed in this question paper, but you should also refer to the other prescribed texts you have read.

From my understanding, "What impression do we get from...?" and "How does...make the text engaging?" questions are 8 markers as 10 markers always feature a statement.

I hope this helps and I can provide an example if you want.
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KateR03
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Thank you very much, this has helped a lot. An example would be great if you have one, but if you don't that's okay!
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thrifty_reviser
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(Original post by KateR03)
Thank you very much, this has helped a lot. An example would be great if you have one, but if you don't that's okay!
'The Roman poets make the countryside sound like a better place to live than the city.' How far do you agree with the statement.

I do not agree with the statement to some extent as Horace uses the character of the town mouse to show the country mouse the pleasure that exists in the city. E.g. as the country mouse 'rejoiced in his changed luck' it shows that the country mouse is able to relax i the city and enjoy the lavish lifestyle. As a result the country mouse has freedom from all other responsibilities such as his thriftiness and farming.

Moreover, I strongly disagree with the statement as the countryside is presented to be a hostile environment. E.g. in Spring and Thoughts of Mortality, Horace refers to 'summer tramp[ling] on spring'. Therefore the aggressive and evil nature of the seasons in the countryside show that this is an unpredictable area. Horace reinforces this when in the town mouse says the 'wild woods'. The adjective 'wild' accentuates a similar idea of hostility as the countryside is less developed and civilised than the city.

Furthermore i do not agree with the statement as in the town mouse and country mouse, Horace seeks to emphasise the beauty of the city. E.g. he refers to the 'rich house' which contains 'cloth tinged with bright scarlet gleaming on top of couches made of ivory'. This sense of luxury is lacking in the countryside and so a general audience would favour the luxury of city life over the simple life in the countryside.

On the other hand, I agree with the statement to some extent as some of the poets reiterate that a simple life in the countryside is better. E.g. in Horace's town mouse and country mouse, the country mouse says that his home 'safe from traps with simple vetch will cheer me up'. The adjective 'simple' may be a reference to Epicurean Philosophy - a state of tranquility can be achieved through the limiting of desires to appreciate the better parts of life. Here, the country mouse prefers the safety and security of the countryside to the lavish lifestyle of urban life where he was threatened by Molossian Hounds.

I also agree with the statement as in a 'Recipe for Happiness' by Martial his overall message was escaping urban life in the city. E.g. he says 'a table simply spread.' This metaphor here also links to Horace's outlook on simplicity. Moreover he says 'never a lawsuit,a toga rarely seen.' Martial wishes to avoid the responsibilities and duties of being a rich citizen in a city (wearing an uncomfortable toga) and wants to avoid this complexity and find peace in the countryside.

Finally, I strongly agree with the statement as Ovid emphasises the prosperity of the countryside. He describes 'streams gliding with a pleasant murmur'. This shows the beauty and idyllic nature of the countryside which is also serene and peaceful. Furthermore Ovid also says 'look at' repeatedly in his poem. He does this to compel people to visualize the countryside in different directions to shows there is so much wonder to admire and that beauty exists everywhere here.

[I think I waffled a lot in some places but still got 10 ]
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KateR03
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(Original post by thrifty_reviser)
'The Roman poets make the countryside sound like a better place to live than the city.' How far do you agree with the statement.

I do not agree with the statement to some extent as Horace uses the character of the town mouse to show the country mouse the pleasure that exists in the city. E.g. as the country mouse 'rejoiced in his changed luck' it shows that the country mouse is able to relax i the city and enjoy the lavish lifestyle. As a result the country mouse has freedom from all other responsibilities such as his thriftiness and farming.

Moreover, I strongly disagree with the statement as the countryside is presented to be a hostile environment. E.g. in Spring and Thoughts of Mortality, Horace refers to 'summer tramp[ling] on spring'. Therefore the aggressive and evil nature of the seasons in the countryside show that this is an unpredictable area. Horace reinforces this when in the town mouse says the 'wild woods'. The adjective 'wild' accentuates a similar idea of hostility as the countryside is less developed and civilised than the city.

Furthermore i do not agree with the statement as in the town mouse and country mouse, Horace seeks to emphasise the beauty of the city. E.g. he refers to the 'rich house' which contains 'cloth tinged with bright scarlet gleaming on top of couches made of ivory'. This sense of luxury is lacking in the countryside and so a general audience would favour the luxury of city life over the simple life in the countryside.

On the other hand, I agree with the statement to some extent as some of the poets reiterate that a simple life in the countryside is better. E.g. in Horace's town mouse and country mouse, the country mouse says that his home 'safe from traps with simple vetch will cheer me up'. The adjective 'simple' may be a reference to Epicurean Philosophy - a state of tranquility can be achieved through the limiting of desires to appreciate the better parts of life. Here, the country mouse prefers the safety and security of the countryside to the lavish lifestyle of urban life where he was threatened by Molossian Hounds.

I also agree with the statement as in a 'Recipe for Happiness' by Martial his overall message was escaping urban life in the city. E.g. he says 'a table simply spread.' This metaphor here also links to Horace's outlook on simplicity. Moreover he says 'never a lawsuit,a toga rarely seen.' Martial wishes to avoid the responsibilities and duties of being a rich citizen in a city (wearing an uncomfortable toga) and wants to avoid this complexity and find peace in the countryside.

Finally, I strongly agree with the statement as Ovid emphasises the prosperity of the countryside. He describes 'streams gliding with a pleasant murmur'. This shows the beauty and idyllic nature of the countryside which is also serene and peaceful. Furthermore Ovid also says 'look at' repeatedly in his poem. He does this to compel people to visualize the countryside in different directions to shows there is so much wonder to admire and that beauty exists everywhere here.

[I think I waffled a lot in some places but still got 10 ]
Thank you so much!!!!
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