rixzino
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Can someone explain the GCSEs when you move to America and how do you apply to Colleges?.
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JustOneMoreThing
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You’ll need to contact the Colleges you’re interested in
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username4230836
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I don’t know much about American education, but you’ll have to do a-levels here or their equivalent in high school over there so you can get into colleges. And then if you finish last two years of school there then ask the school, but if you’re finishing a-levels here and then going to university then research the universities you want to go and look at their requirements and their equivalent. And contact them directly if you’re still unsure.

Bear in mind that colleges in America don’t just look at grades. They look at you’re extra curricular activities, you’re interests, you’re hobbies and also you’ll have to write a personal essay related to your course that you want to do as your application.

There is a member on here who went to college into America and they’ll be able to help you with the application process
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Dk70101
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In the US, you would be taking your GCSE's in the "tenth grade". Instead of colleges, you have high schools that last four years (starting in the 9th grade) and so you should contact schools directly asking if they accept students (most of them will) as you would be applying to the 11th grade after your GCSE's. However, there is no GCSE equivalent in the US and so I am not sure if they will really look/care about your grades as much. When looking at schools, since there are no A-levels or BTEC's, you might want to consider AP or IB.

AP- one-year courses with external exams. More flexibility as you can do different subjects every year.
IB- 2-year courses with external exams. Must do 6 subjects to receive the IB diploma.

I hope that I was clear and that this helps!
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username4230836
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(Original post by Dk70101)
In the US, you would be taking your GCSE's in the "tenth grade". Instead of colleges, you have high schools that last four years (starting in the 9th grade) and so you should contact schools directly asking if they accept students (most of them will) as you would be applying to the 11th grade after your GCSE's. However, there is no GCSE equivalent in the US and so I am not sure if they will really look/care about your grades as much. When looking at schools, since there are no A-levels or BTEC's, you might want to consider AP or IB.

AP- one-year courses with external exams. More flexibility as you can do different subjects every year.
IB- 2-year courses with external exams. Must do 6 subjects to receive the IB diploma.

I hope that I was clear and that this helps!
I’ve alwyas wondered what AP classes were. I always hear about them but didn’t know what they where. I know that if you’re in junior year, you take an AP class and you’re sat with the seniors. So in a way it’s for the clever?

And dont they have SATs at the end of junior year which help towards college applications in their senior year alongside their personal essay?
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NetNeutrality
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(Original post by Nadia19962)
I’ve alwyas wondered what AP classes were. I always hear about them but didn’t know what they where. I know that if you’re in junior year, you take an AP class and you’re sat with the seniors. So in a way it’s for the clever? I could be wrong.

In continuation of this reply, in junior year of high school (16/17) you take SATs and I could be wrong but from what I know from family in the US, the SATs are your end of year exams and those exams help you towards college applications in your senior year. At the beginning of senior year is when college applications begin and depending on what school you go you might have to do auditions (Juilliard) or do a creative piece (Tish school of arts or the theatre department in Yale). If you’re doing academic subjects, I don’t know much about those, sorry.
AP is advanced placement, so yea it is pretty much for the clever kids. you have to do the SAT/ACT in 11th grade (year 12) which is like a uni entrance test. everything else you said is pretty much correct
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username4230836
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(Original post by NetNeutrality)
AP is advanced placement, so yea it is pretty much for the clever kids. you have to do the SAT/ACT in 11th grade (year 12) which is like a uni entrance test. everything else you said is pretty much correct
I picked this up from family in the US and tv shows lol
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Reso1utionS
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Can someone tell you how to apply for College in the UK? I recently moved my family to London and I want to go to College. But first, I need to know how to submit the documents correctly. I will be glad to any help. By the way, it was not so difficult to move. Although we probably just got lucky with the guys from cheap removals London who were able to help us with the move. They are really masters of their craft. Thanks to their flexible booking schedule, we were able to choose the perfect day to move. They provided us with a full package of services, including large clean vans and packaging materials. I think we couldn't have done it without them, very grateful
Last edited by Reso1utionS; 2 weeks ago
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