PKT358
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So I'm thinking of applying to study at university, and have about a week and a half to decide on a course, write a personal statement, get a reference, and send off my application. It's safe to say it's a bit of a rush.

I am thinking of studying a maths bachelors, and have A*A* in a-level maths and further maths, however a good portion of this was through the use of YouTube channels such as ExamSolutions and HegartyMaths.

I learn best using online videos with simplistic explanations, and like to take my time absorbing and truly understanding the content before moving on. So my question to all the university maths students out there, is would I thrive in the university environment studying this subject? My worries are that:
- 1: There will be very limited videos online when it comes to specific modules in university
2: The content will be covered at such a rate that you have to rush through, not fully understanding what you are learning before moving onto the next topic

I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks
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kkboyk
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(Original post by PKT358)
So I'm thinking of applying to study at university, and have about a week and a half to decide on a course, write a personal statement, get a reference, and send off my application. It's safe to say it's a bit of a rush.

I am thinking of studying a maths bachelors, and have A*A* in a-level maths and further maths, however a good portion of this was through the use of YouTube channels such as ExamSolutions and HegartyMaths.

I learn best using online videos with simplistic explanations, and like to take my time absorbing and truly understanding the content before moving on. So my question to all the university maths students out there, is would I thrive in the university environment studying this subject? My worries are that:
- 1: There will be very limited videos online when it comes to specific modules in university
2: The content will be covered at such a rate that you have to rush through, not fully understanding what you are learning before moving onto the next topic

I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks
You will gain enough materials to study from (e.g. mainly books, lecture notes, other uni lecture notes, MOOCs). Although the course will be quite fast paced due to the sheer amount of content to cover and difficulty, you will not be rushing provided that you set up a timetable to study regularly and start assignments early. Provided that you are going to attend a uni with a good Maths department, you will learn most of the things in Lecture.

At university things become more abstract and require a far more subtle and reasoned approach to answer questions. You'll be expected to work within the context of abstract mathematical structures, follow and construct rigorous proofs and be able to apply theorems to concrete examples of those structures to any given questions. You will be focusing on developing your intuition, problem solving and creativity skills throughout your degree. Help will be limited (in the sense that you will only be guided slightly on how to approach the problem, and not be given direct answers like on A-level), so you really do have to rack your head and solve problems to the best of your abilities.

I can't say whether or not you will thrive, as it's dependant on your motivation and the amount of effort you put throughout those 3yrs. If you genuinely like the subject, are curious, and feel that a Maths degree will benefit you then by all means apply for it.
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marinade
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You do a maths degree and you really do realise everyone learns differently. All those other A grade students, they learn differently despite being motivated. So doing so off youtube that's fine. It doesn't make you cleverer or stupider than anyone else, it's just how you learn. There will be videos for some of the material you're learning online in video format just it may be harder for you to locate.

In terms of pace and 'not understanding' things first time, that's pretty normal in Maths/other subjects at university. If you said this to your future lecturers they'd say much the same and say things like go away and have a look at it and if you still have problems come back to me. Or things like 'go away and sit in a dark room' until you work it out. For topics in Analysis this sort of comment that ' don't understand it' is fairly normal and it's on the second variant of the course when you go over it sinks in better. I saw lots and lots of this at university when people were doing calculus modules and then 2-3 analysis ones and people would hate the early analysis ones and then more people would get it by the last real analysis course. When we got onto complex analysis and then so called applications of applying it, people would be wow complex analysis such a beautiful subject.

My tips for studying maths at university level:-
a) regular workloads
b) if you're stuck on something after a certain amount of time, come back to it later (this can include a sleep)
c) teach yourself
d) remember it's hard.

I've no idea whether you'd thrive or not.
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