Screenwriting Watch

CordyC
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I’m interested in pursuing screenwriting as a career. I can either do a degree in film & tv production (with optional screenwriting modules & specialising in yr3 for my dissertation) or do a straight-up screenwriting degree. I like the idea of being taught more skills with a production degree but I’m worried it won’t tell me enough about writing which is ultimately where I want to end up. Which degree would be best to choose?
Last edited by CordyC; 5 months ago
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AnnaMirjam
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Why don't you choose a Film Production/Filmmaking & Screenwriting degree? There are courses that offers courses with these specialisations (for example University of Chichester and University of West of Scotland, which I'm also applying to), or film and creative writing.
Which universities are you planning to apply?
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CordyC
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(Original post by AnnaMirjam)
Why don't you choose a Film Production/Filmmaking & Screenwriting degree? There are courses that offers courses with these specialisations (for example University of Chichester and University of West of Scotland, which I'm also applying to), or film and creative writing.
Which universities are you planning to apply?
I don’t have strong opinions on where I go, I’m lucky to live where I have a lot of train/public transport access. I’ll just go wherever do the degree I want. Would filmmaking be a lot of camerawork etc do you know? If I’m totally honest my main focus is purely writing/story-based.
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Brighton Film School
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(Original post by CordyC)I don’t have strong opinions on where I go, I’m lucky to live where I have a lot of train/public transport access. I’ll just go wherever do the degree I want. Would filmmaking be a lot of camerawork etc do you know? If I’m totally honest my main focus is purely writing/story-based.

Hi CordyC

The majority of Film Production degrees should let you major in an area of film of your choice in the final year. For example, our BA Hons Film Production is structured so the first year you learn all aspects of the filmmaking process, the second year you begin to specialise so can choose optional modules such as directing and writing for screen and then the third and final year you can choose a film form and film discipline of your choice. For example, you can write a feature film script as your major project, which is worth 50% of your final year mark. This will give you a portfolio and CV that is focused and tailored to mainly screenwriting.

I hope that helps, please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks

H
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CordyC
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Thank you so much! I will definitely look into applying there.

(Original post by Brighton Film School)(Original post by CordyC)I don’t have strong opinions on where I go, I’m lucky to live where I have a lot of train/public transport access. I’ll just go wherever do the degree I want. Would filmmaking be a lot of camerawork etc do you know? If I’m totally honest my main focus is purely writing/story-based.

Hi CordyC

The majority of Film Production degrees should let you major in an area of film of your choice in the final year. For example, our BA Hons Film Production is structured so the first year you learn all aspects of the filmmaking process, the second year you begin to specialise so can choose optional modules such as directing and writing for screen and then the third and final year you can choose a film form and film discipline of your choice. For example, you can write a feature film script as your major project, which is worth 50% of your final year mark. This will give you a portfolio and CV that is focused and tailored to mainly screenwriting.

I hope that helps, please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks

H
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kurllly
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Hi! I recently graduated from Norwich University of the Arts, and for the majority of my time there I wrote screenplays. The attitude of the course is to make the students become an ‘all rounder’, so you’re encouraged to take on a different role in each production. This, speaking as someone who was adamant to just write, was brilliant. It allows you to understand the entire filmmaking process and gain an appreciation for other crafts, rather than get bogged down in one specialism. I distinctly remember at my first open day at NUA the course leader saying “We want storytellers! We can teach you how to use the equipment, but not how to conceive ideas.”. At other open days, at highly ranked universities that boast about their film courses, they preached about their equipment and successes of previous students. Not one place celebrated THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE TO MAKE STORIES! This attitude needs to be embraced more across the board! But, writing isn’t the be all and end all; you tell a story by exploring the subtext and miss-en-scene! You need to work together with cinematographers, gaffers, production designers, sound designers and editors to expand on the world you’ve created with your script. If you opt for a course that simply specialises in screenwriting, you may miss out on this crucial daily dialogue you’ll have with other filmmakers. You could always specialise in screenwriting as an MA, but make sure you’re always writing outside of class! Write and collaborate with your classmates!
Last edited by kurllly; 4 months ago
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CordyC
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(Original post by kurllly)Hi! I recently graduated from Norwich University of the Arts, and for the majority of my time there I wrote screenplays. The attitude of the course is to make the students become an ‘all rounder’, so you’re encouraged to take on a different role in each production. This, speaking as someone who was adamant to just write, was brilliant. It allows you to understand the entire filmmaking process and gain an appreciation for other crafts, rather than get bogged down in one specialism. I distinctly remember at my first open day at NUA the course leader saying “We want storytellers! We can teach you how to use the equipment, but not how to conceive ideas.”. At other open days, at highly ranked universities that boast about their film courses, they preached about their equipment and successes of previous students. Not one place celebrated THE PEOPLE WHO LOVE TO MAKE STORIES! This attitude needs to be embraced more across the board! But, writing isn’t the be all and end all; you tell a story by exploring the subtext and miss-en-scene! You need to work together with cinematographers, gaffers, production designers, sound designers and editors to expand on the world you’ve created with your script. If you opt for a course that simply specialises in screenwriting, you may miss out on this crucial daily dialogue you’ll have with other filmmakers. You could always specialise in screenwriting as an MA, but make sure you’re always writing outside of class! Write and collaborate with your classmates!
Thank you so much, it’s great to hear from someone who knows exactly what I mean. I’ll definitely look into applying there!
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kurllly
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(Original post by CordyC)
Thank you so much, it’s great to hear from someone who knows exactly what I mean. I’ll definitely look into applying there!
Not a problem! If you have any questions about the uni or the course, feel free to DM me
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scorpionfish17
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Hey there!

I'm also really interested in screenwriting, but I'm trying to go about it in a different way. I've applied to study joint English and Film at the University of Reading, in the hopes that through English I will better my writing skills, and through a combination of theory and practical modules in Film, I can apply those skills in a 'film industry' type scenario. For me, it was really important that the Film course offered both theory and practical options as it can give me a taste of film production, as well as learning from actual film. I believe there are also English modules linked to media and creative writing within the course. And at the end of the day, if I change my mind, an English degree is always good to have.

Sorry if there wasn't actually much advice here, I know this suggestion only really works if you take English Literature at A-level. But I just thought I'd let you know the route I'm hoping to take, and to know what you want from from the Film course.

Good luck with everything!
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