tasneem.016
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question: was the activities of the suffragettes the main reason why women got the vote in 1918?

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in 1918, for the first time in the UK women over 30 were given the right to vote. The suffragettes and suffragists fought for the right to vote for over 70 years. They also proved the government wrong by contributing to the war effort. This showed the government that women were able to do the work that was set only for men and that women have the same abilities. After 1906, however social changes brought about by the liberal reforms changed many things for the country where everyone should be treated equally and have their own freedom. Many people think this was the reason why women got the vote in 1918.
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londonmyst
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No.
The militancy and criminal conduct of the suffragettes only hardened opposition to female suffrage, strengthening the resolve of anti-suffrage politicians like Herbert Asquith.
The peaceful public rallies and calm lobbying campaign of the suffragists led by Millicent Fawcett persuaded many men to support female suffrage.

World War One and its aftermath played a substantial role in why women over 30 with property got the vote in 1918.
The outbreak of war temporarily suspended the high profile campaigns of both suffragists and suffragettes; both of whom immediately began activities to support the war effort.
Many women joined nursing teams and temporarily took over the jobs done by mean who had been conscripted into the army (bus conductors, farmhands, telephone operators, factory workers)- keeping things going on the home front, earning new found respect for women's rights and support for female suffrage.
Even from very hostile individuals such as Herbert Asquith.
When parliament debated extending the vote to soldiers whose families were rate paying tenants, politicians expressed support for also extending the vote to munitions workers- both male and female.
From then onwards, the social tone on the whole issue of female suffrage had become more positive than had been the case prior to the war.
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katf
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
The militancy and criminal conduct of the suffragettes only hardened opposition to female suffrage, strengthening the resolve of anti-suffrage politicians like Herbert Asquith.
The peaceful public rallies and calm lobbying campaign of the suffragists led by Millicent Fawcett persuaded many men to support female suffrage.

World War One and its aftermath played a substantial role in why women over 30 with property got the vote in 1918.
The outbreak of war temporarily suspended the high profile campaigns of both suffragists and suffragettes; both of whom immediately began activities to support the war effort.
Many women joined nursing teams and temporarily took over the jobs done by mean who had been conscripted into the army (bus conductors, farmhands, telephone operators, factory workers)- keeping things going on the home front, earning new found respect for women's rights and support for female suffrage.
Even from very hostile individuals such as Herbert Asquith.
When parliament debated extending the vote to soldiers whose families were rate paying tenants, politicians expressed support for also extending the vote to munitions workers- both male and female.
From then onwards, the social tone on the whole issue of female suffrage had become more positive than had been the case prior to the war.
Correction, many suffragists refused to support war work as such. They worked primarily as nurses, and refused to attempt to recruit men to the war effort or manufacture weapons. Many were Quakers like myself. Given the peace doctrine, manufacturing devices designed to kill is against our beliefs.

I'd argue that the suffragists arguments were the reason that we got the vote, although there was a threat of a return to direct action by the suffragettes. After a war, it's understandable that politicians may have acquiesced for the sake of a quiet life.
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