Hazelly
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Hello everyone, I'm in year 11. Studying:
Romeo & Juliet
Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
An inspector calls
And then the poetry.
I'm struggling with ideas of how to revise for the 3 texts, any tips? I have all the revision guides, but as strange as it sounds no idea how to revise for them. Any help would be great, as I'm stressing over the exams, help!
Thanks, hazza.
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Iamtheonetheone
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(Original post by Hazzabear)
Hello everyone, I'm in year 11. Studying:
Romeo & Juliet
Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
An inspector calls
And then the poetry.
I'm struggling with ideas of how to revise for the 3 texts, any tips? I have all the revision guides, but as strange as it sounds no idea how to revise for them. Any help would be great, as I'm stressing over the exams, help!
Thanks, hazza.
hey hazza, I am actually have same problem as you and I am really scared that Im going to fail my gcses as i am only getting 6/7 in my english assesments right now. However ,I would recommend making essay plans for the texts as it will easily help u especially if the question u have created an essay plan for comes up. If u do have any feedback for me pls help too,I have my mocks tomorrow and i NEED to be revising but im not lol.
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absolutelysprout
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quotes on flashcards- there's other resources online such as quizlet. try linking context to quotes and themes where relevant.
make mindmaps, tables, lists... for characters and themes where there should be quotes and brief analysis.
you could you know... revise off the revision guides.
plenty of practice exam questions online you can do to get the hang of exam technique and ensure you understand all aspects of the text well.
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LexiKristen
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I got two 9’s at GCSE last year. I studied Macbeth, Jekyll and Hyde, DNA and poetry - so not the same texts in general - but I guess revision techniques would be similar. Overall in my opinion, the main priority is understanding the plot of the text, knowing the text and major themes. Quotes aren’t actually that important, you need to know a few major ones, but not many. I didn’t know many quotes, but achieved almost full marks through linking to different parts in the play to manipulate the question into a unique exam response. Basically, don’t go for the obvious response. Practice looking at exam questions and think about a strong unique argument that’ll put you above all the other candidates they’ve been marking for hours.
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lollolokjob
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(Original post by LexiKristen)
I got two 9’s at GCSE last year. I studied Macbeth, Jekyll and Hyde, DNA and poetry - so not the same texts in general - but I guess revision techniques would be similar. Overall in my opinion, the main priority is understanding the plot of the text, knowing the text and major themes. Quotes aren’t actually that important, you need to know a few major ones, but not many. I didn’t know many quotes, but achieved almost full marks through linking to different parts in the play to manipulate the question into a unique exam response. Basically, don’t go for the obvious response. Practice looking at exam questions and think about a strong unique argument that’ll put you above all the other candidates they’ve been marking for hours.
Couldn't agree more.

Think deeply about what the author is trying to communicate through the quote and text rather than just analysing the text. This way, you get a good mix on the AO1, AO2 and AO3.

With J&H, always relate it back to society. Example:

Stevenson juxtaposes Hyde and Jekyll with the nature of their bodily features, as Hyde's is "thickly shaded." Whilst Jekyll's is "firm white." This suggests that Evangelical principles and morals of a Victorian gentleman are pure compared to the dark "devil" and "ape-like" nature of Hyde. Stevenson is clearly trying to suggest that the temptation of being Hyde expresses the thought-process of an irresponsible, uncontrollable primate, violating evangelical principles and thus painting Darwinist ideas and the "terror" it causes, as immoral and incompatible with the "professional" Dr Jekyll.

Remember to keep quotations short and precise. I actually don't have a quote more than two words in that short piece of analysis.

With An Inspector Calls, its no different. Example:

Just for reference the question I was answering: How does J.B. Priestley present conflict between the older and younger generations in the play An Inspector Calls?

Okay a few things.

What is the key bit about that question? Older and younger generations.

So what is Priestley trying to communicate with the differences he presents in the older and younger generations? Presumably something to do with the negatives of Capitalism and the advantages of Socialism (context)?

Example:

Another example of the generation gap is located at the end of Act Two. The arrogant Mrs Birling removes her own veil of microcosm exposing her own son Eric. Sheila is displayed by Priestley as quick witted by intuitively highlighting the lapse in her mothers logic, only for Mrs Birling to understand too late. Sheila repeating the phrase "begged" could symbolise the lower classes' fight for higher pay, or the ignorance and stupidity of those with Capitalist views.


The best way to revise is just to understand the texts to a higher degree by re-reading them and knowing important plot points inside out. To get grades 8-9s examiners are looking for answers that aren't just regurgitated out of a study guide. E.g. In Romeo and Juliet, the pun "sycamore" used by Benvolio symbolises.... Everyone uses those.

Be unique, choose something different, get rewarded for your view on the text as a result.

Also, don't look too deep. If one quote makes you think a certain way or feeling then describe that in your analysis. English is subjective not objective. As long as you can justify that view throughout, be confident.

Sorry for the lengthy answer but hope this helps.

Cheers.
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LexiKristen
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(Original post by lollolokjob)
Couldn't agree more.

Think deeply about what the author is trying to communicate through the quote and text rather than just analysing the text. This way, you get a good mix on the AO1, AO2 and AO3.

With J&H, always relate it back to society. Example:

Stevenson juxtaposes Hyde and Jekyll with the nature of their bodily features, as Hyde's is "thickly shaded." Whilst Jekyll's is "firm white." This suggests that Evangelical principles and morals of a Victorian gentleman are pure compared to the dark "devil" and "ape-like" nature of Hyde. Stevenson is clearly trying to suggest that the temptation of being Hyde expresses the thought-process of an irresponsible, uncontrollable primate, violating evangelical principles and thus painting Darwinist ideas and the "terror" it causes, as immoral and incompatible with the "professional" Dr Jekyll.

Remember to keep quotations short and precise. I actually don't have a quote more than two words in that short piece of analysis.

With An Inspector Calls, its no different. Example:

Just for reference the question I was answering: How does J.B. Priestley present conflict between the older and younger generations in the play An Inspector Calls?

Okay a few things.

What is the key bit about that question? Older and younger generations.

So what is Priestley trying to communicate with the differences he presents in the older and younger generations? Presumably something to do with the negatives of Capitalism and the advantages of Socialism (context)?

Example:

Another example of the generation gap is located at the end of Act Two. The arrogant Mrs Birling removes her own veil of microcosm exposing her own son Eric. Sheila is displayed by Priestley as quick witted by intuitively highlighting the lapse in her mothers logic, only for Mrs Birling to understand too late. Sheila repeating the phrase "begged" could symbolise the lower classes' fight for higher pay, or the ignorance and stupidity of those with Capitalist views.


The best way to revise is just to understand the texts to a higher degree by re-reading them and knowing important plot points inside out. To get grades 8-9s examiners are looking for answers that aren't just regurgitated out of a study guide. E.g. In Romeo and Juliet, the pun "sycamore" used by Benvolio symbolises.... Everyone uses those.

Be unique, choose something different, get rewarded for your view on the text as a result.

Also, don't look too deep. If one quote makes you think a certain way or feeling then describe that in your analysis. English is subjective not objective. As long as you can justify that view throughout, be confident.

Sorry for the lengthy answer but hope this helps.

Cheers.
This guy basically wrote out my thoughts in a lengthier better-written way. Do this and you’ll do great.
Last edited by LexiKristen; 1 year ago
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Hazelly
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IamtheonetheoneYou'll be fine! I did a mock recently and only got a 5 as i went into right mind blank, i've started to make essay plans. I hope your mock went well!
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Hazelly
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LexiKristen Thank you, well done on getting 9's last year!
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Hazelly
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lollolokjob Wowww, thank you so much for that detailed message. Deeply appreciated it!
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Tolgash
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(Original post by LexiKristen)
I got two 9’s at GCSE last year. I studied Macbeth, Jekyll and Hyde, DNA and poetry - so not the same texts in general - but I guess revision techniques would be similar. Overall in my opinion, the main priority is understanding the plot of the text, knowing the text and major themes. Quotes aren’t actually that important, you need to know a few major ones, but not many. I didn’t know many quotes, but achieved almost full marks through linking to different parts in the play to manipulate the question into a unique exam response. Basically, don’t go for the obvious response. Practice looking at exam questions and think about a strong unique argument that’ll put you above all the other candidates they’ve been marking for hours.
What was your mark, if you don't mind disclosing it?
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LexiKristen
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
What was your mark, if you don't mind disclosing it?
I don’t actually know, we were not told. I only know I was close to full marks as my English teacher said so on results day.
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LexiKristen
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(Original post by Hazzabear)
LexiKristen Thank you, well done on getting 9's last year!
Thanks ^.^

goodluck!
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Tolgash
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(Original post by LexiKristen)
I don’t actually know, we were not told. I only know I was close to full marks as my English teacher said so on results day.
Ah, that's fair enough. Did you not want the mark breakdown? I would have been curious haha. I scored 154/160, which was a decent score for someone that might apparently lack the visual memory haha. Congratulations though, that's quite a feat!

Please tell me that you're still studying literature at A-level?
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LexiKristen
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Ah, that's fair enough. Did you not want the mark breakdown? I would have been curious haha. I scored 154/160, which was a decent score for someone that might apparently lack the visual memory haha. Congratulations though, that's quite a feat!

Please tell me that you're still studying literature at A-level?
We weren’t given the option for mark breakdown unfortunately

its funny, I had no intention of taking English at A level. I walked into my enrolment intending to take maths, physics and computer science, and the woman put me down for English combined without giving me much say. Have to say though, best decision ever. I really do love English.
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Tolgash
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(Original post by LexiKristen)
We weren’t given the option for mark breakdown unfortunately

its funny, I had no intention of taking English at A level. I walked into my enrolment intending to take maths, physics and computer science, and the woman put me down for English combined without giving me much say. Have to say though, best decision ever. I really do love English.
Damn, that's unfortunate.

Anyway, that sounds like a brilliant move. I'm glad you enjoy English. What texts are you studying at A-level? What's the combined course like? I'm studying the two separately.
Last edited by Tolgash; 1 year ago
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