JuHeMaMi
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Hi,I have graduated with a BSc Psychology in the netherlands and since my boyfriend and I moved in together, I am looking for information about the british requirements to become a psychotherapist, as it seems it is a little different to what I thought it is. Basically, how i understand you become a psychotherapist or counsellor is, you do your undergraduate, then do a BPS or BACP accredited MSc and then get into chartered training. Is that correct? And what is the exact difference to clinical psychologist and counsellor/ psychotherapist? In other countries, these professions seem to be more intertwined.Thanks!
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by JuHeMaMi)
Hi,I have graduated with a BSc Psychology in the netherlands and since my boyfriend and I moved in together, I am looking for information about the british requirements to become a psychotherapist, as it seems it is a little different to what I thought it is. Basically, how i understand you become a psychotherapist or counsellor is, you do your undergraduate, then do a BPS or BACP accredited MSc and then get into chartered training. Is that correct? And what is the exact difference to clinical psychologist and counsellor/ psychotherapist? In other countries, these professions seem to be more intertwined.Thanks!
Counsellors and Psychotherapists have their own routes to training. Rule of thumb is BACP mainly for counselling and UKCP for Psychotherapy, but there is overlap, and you can check their websites to see the requirements. This website goes into some of the differences:
https://timewith.co.uk/blog/whats-th...-psychologist/

Clinical Psychologists are different to counsellors and psychotherapists for several reasons. Counsellors/Psychotherapists mainly focus on providing therapy and counselling. That is their core training and it is focussed on learning some of the theory but mainly getting patient hours in the therapy room. Your job is then to provide therapy. If you are more senior you may supervise others or manage a service.

Clinical Psychologists are required to complete a doctorate which requires several competencies: One of these is being able to provide therapy. Others include proficiency in neuropsychological testing (e.g. Intelligence tests, Dementia assessments), full lifespan training within NHS services (including child, adult, older adult, learning difficulties), and doctoral level research as evidenced by completing a full thesis. They are also mandated to have experience in consultancy, leadership, supervision and service evaluation/audit.

By way illustration, I am a clinical psychologist who leads a team, but about 40% of my time is involved in providing therapy. The rest is in management, consultancy and doing statistics/evaluation work of my staff. I have a psychotherapist who works under me, whose job is 100% therapy. Our working days look very different as a result.
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OxFossil
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(Original post by JuHeMaMi)
Hi,I have graduated with a BSc Psychology in the netherlands and since my boyfriend and I moved in together, I am looking for information about the british requirements to become a psychotherapist, as it seems it is a little different to what I thought it is. Basically, how i understand you become a psychotherapist or counsellor is, you do your undergraduate, then do a BPS or BACP accredited MSc and then get into chartered training. Is that correct? And what is the exact difference to clinical psychologist and counsellor/ psychotherapist? In other countries, these professions seem to be more intertwined.Thanks!
An important point is that there are different levels of legal and professional protection for the specific title one wishes to adopt. It is not always straightforward to work out which is which!

Some titles are strictly regulated by law i.e. You must have attained certain qualifications in order to use the title and may be prosecuted if you use that title without the necessary registration. These professions are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council. This covers Arts Therapists and Practising Psychologists (including Clinical Psychologists) See here: https://www.hcpc-uk.org/about-us/who...e-professions/

Some titles are not protected by law, but have recognised professional registers, regulated by the Professional Standards Authority. In theory, one could call oneself by a title on these registers without joining the register, but it would be considered professionally disreputable to do so. The PSA registers include things like the BACP for counsellors and psychotherapists https://www.professionalstandards.or...ind-a-register

Thirdly, there are titles which have neither legal protection nor a professional register. These tend to be minor/fringe practices like crystal healing or past life regression (although not all are woo)

These arrangements do mean that it may be necessary to maintain membership of more than one register; when I worked as a psychotherapist, I had to maintain membership of 3 separate registers.
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JuHeMaMi
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Thank you for your detailed response. Very helpful! I suppose I am more leaning into the direction of clinical psychology then. Am I correct to assume, that as a Clinical Psychologist I would have broader possibilities to build a career within institutions/ hospitals/ etc. ?
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