That'sGreat
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
How good is Durham for graduate employability. Most careers don’t give a toss about what subject you did as long as you know the stuff and went to a top uni. I realise Durham is supposedly 3rdish in the U.K. for 90% of the subjects or so, but what are the employability prospects? I see MBBs pretty much only want Oxbridge or LSE, and I’m not staying in London and got rejected from Oxford. Can Durham students still make it into MBBs like McKinseys, or top IB jobs?
0
reply
Simbasoul
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by That'sGreat)
How good is Durham for graduate employability. Most careers don’t give a toss about what subject you did as long as you know the stuff and went to a top uni. I realise Durham is supposedly 3rdish in the U.K. for 90% of the subjects or so, but what are the employability prospects? I see MBBs pretty much only want Oxbridge or LSE, and I’m not staying in London and got rejected from Oxford. Can Durham students still make it into MBBs like McKinseys, or top IB jobs?
In short: very good:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/study/ug/employability/
0
reply
Dannyboy2015
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Durham is a good uni.

Next Q pls.

Longer answer: For some certain schools of study other uni's will be much better, but it is still a v. good uni.
0
reply
That'sGreat
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Simbasoul)
In short: very good:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/study/ug/employability/
That doesn’t separate top jobs for mediocre jobs though

(Original post by Dannyboy2015)
Durham is a good uni.

Next Q pls.

Longer answer: For some certain schools of study other uni's will be much better, but it is still a v. good uni.
You haven’t actually read the question
0
reply
Dannyboy2015
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by That'sGreat)
That doesn’t separate top jobs for mediocre jobs though


You haven’t actually read the question
I did, you just snuck another question at the end of your wall-o-text : )

However, the answer to your 2nd question can be found from a quick google search.. The answer is...

Yes.
0
reply
HoldThisL
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by That'sGreat)
I realise Durham is supposedly 3rdish in the U.K. for 90% of the subjects or so
Slight exaggeration but the answer to your question is yes. You'll find a greater problem to getting employed, however, is your attitude.
1
reply
Exceptional
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
Well, most people consider Durham a semi-target, so your prospects of getting into the MBB or IB are similar to Bristol/Nottingham students on uni rep alone. It's still possible, of course, but that's the reality. If you struggle to build a competitive enough profile then postgrad at a target might help.
Last edited by Exceptional; 2 years ago
0
reply
That'sGreat
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by HoldThisL)
Slight exaggeration but the answer to your question is yes. You'll find a greater problem to getting employed, however, is your attitude.
Yes, because the attitude of people on the internet accurately represents someone’s attitude in a professional setting...
0
reply
HoldThisL
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by That'sGreat)
Yes, because the attitude of people on the internet accurately represents someone’s attitude in a professional setting...
That's great.
0
reply
That'sGreat
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by HoldThisL)
That's great.
Cringe
0
reply
CoolCavy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
Yes it has a good reputation although it does have a secondary reputation of being the place oxbrige rejects go
More importantly than it's reputation, do you like the course? the uni? the location? even if it has the best reputation in the entire world it's you who is going to have to study there for however many years. I also think you have slightly the wrong perception of employers, most dont care about the uni you went to they care more about the course and what you studied/learned on it/your industry experience
Doonesbury will probably be able to tell you more
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yes it has a good reputation although it does have a secondary reputation of being the place oxbrige rejects go
More importantly than it's reputation, do you like the course? the uni? the location? even if it has the best reputation in the entire world it's you who is going to have to study there for however many years. I also think you have slightly the wrong perception of employers, most dont care about the uni you went to they care more about the course and what you studied/learned on it/your industry experience
Doonesbury will probably be able to tell you more
Paging auburnstar to the thread!
0
reply
prostheticzeta
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
Durham is a target uni. Many banks, consultancy and finance firms host events and encourage Durham students to apply. So yes, very good, I would apply.
0
reply
Exceptional
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by prostheticzeta)
Durham is a target uni. Many banks, consultancy and finance firms host events and encourage Durham students to apply. So yes, very good, I would apply.
It isn't a target.
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by Exceptional)
It isn't a target.
Old but I don't imagine it's changed much:
https://news.efinancialcareers.com/u...-friendly-unis

And for law:
https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/wh...d-universities
Last edited by Doones; 2 years ago
0
reply
auburnstar
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
Durham's law department has a very good reputation. It is competitive and is well-recognised. 89% of people achieve a 2:1 or First with a 97.8% continuation rate.

"Of those students who graduated in 2017:
81% are in paid employment or further study 6 months after graduation Of those in employment: 88% are in graduate-level employment Median salary £24,750" (bear in mind these are earnings only 6 months after graduation, and they already approach the average UK salary of 27K)

As for it being a target, I certainly get a lot of emails from internship and career-related opportunities for finance and legal sectors even when doing a non-law degree, so I imagine doing a law degree would get even more attention. At the Careers Events, there was a significant portion of law, commercial and legal firms (and because the companies have to pay a small contribution to be present at these events, it does suggest they think it's financially worthwhile to target Durham grads).

Durham is also good on some other accounts. It is a lot cheaper to live in than London and most parts of the UK (the North East, excluding parts of Newcastle, has some of the cheapest private rental housing). Comparatively, you get more for your money and this applies to housing, shopping, food, etc. The college system is good because you have a strong support network: the Disability Support at the Palatine Centre, Student Support in College, the Welfare Team in College, Counselling at the Palatine Centre and informal support structures. It's also a nice size of city - being not too overwhelming but not oppressively small either.

I would look at whether you want campus vs non-campus university, whether saving money is important to you vs being closer to London and most importantly whether you like the structure of the particular law course/LLB at Durham.

[There are some aspects I think that could be better like overall diversity (although it is more diverse than the surrounding city because it is historically a working-class mining town) and financial support for working-class and estranged students especially, but this is also a general problem with many universities in general. Not to dismiss this issue, just to mention it is not exclusive to Durham.]
1
reply
That'sGreat
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#17
(Original post by auburnstar)
Durham's law department has a very good reputation. It is competitive and is well-recognised. 89% of people achieve a 2:1 or First with a 97.8% continuation rate.

"Of those students who graduated in 2017:
81% are in paid employment or further study 6 months after graduation Of those in employment: 88% are in graduate-level employment Median salary £24,750" (bear in mind these are earnings only 6 months after graduation, and they already approach the average UK salary of 27K)

As for it being a target, I certainly get a lot of emails from internship and career-related opportunities for finance and legal sectors even when doing a non-law degree, so I imagine doing a law degree would get even more attention. At the Careers Events, there was a significant portion of law, commercial and legal firms (and because the companies have to pay a small contribution to be present at these events, it does suggest they think it's financially worthwhile to target Durham grads).

Durham is also good on some other accounts. It is a lot cheaper to live in than London and most parts of the UK (the North East, excluding parts of Newcastle, has some of the cheapest private rental housing). Comparatively, you get more for your money and this applies to housing, shopping, food, etc. The college system is good because you have a strong support network: the Disability Support at the Palatine Centre, Student Support in College, the Welfare Team in College, Counselling at the Palatine Centre and informal support structures. It's also a nice size of city - being not too overwhelming but not oppressively small either.

I would look at whether you want campus vs non-campus university, whether saving money is important to you vs being closer to London and most importantly whether you like the structure of the particular law course/LLB at Durham.

[There are some aspects I think that could be better like overall diversity (although it is more diverse than the surrounding city because it is historically a working-class mining town) and financial support for working-class and estranged students especially, but this is also a general problem with many universities in general. Not to dismiss this issue, just to mention it is not exclusive to Durham.]
Do you have information for non-law degrees and non-Law career sectors?
0
reply
Simbasoul
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by That'sGreat)
Do you have information for non-law degrees and non-Law career sectors?
I’m sure the university would happily furnish you with details about graduate destinations for any courses you are considering.
0
reply
auburnstar
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by That'sGreat)
Do you have information for non-law degrees and non-Law career sectors?
What are you looking at in particular? It varies from department to department and b/w Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities subjects.

Here is a general indicator of career destinations by degree from the 2015-16 cycle: https://www.dur.ac.uk/careers/studen...raduates/dlhe/
0
reply
UgurG
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#20
Report 10 months ago
#20
one of the best.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What support do you need with your UCAS application?

I need help researching unis (24)
13.41%
I need help researching courses (12)
6.7%
I need help with filling out the application form (9)
5.03%
I need help with my personal statement (75)
41.9%
I need help with understanding how to make my application stand out (42)
23.46%
I need help with something else (let us know in the thread!) (3)
1.68%
I'm feeling confident about my application and don't need any help at the moment (14)
7.82%

Watched Threads

View All