OCR Psychology textbook questions and answer please help

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Aishraat
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#1
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Hello,

I have the mike Cardwell 1st edition psychology text book for a level. It’s old like 1996 but I don’t really care as long as it’s still relevant today which I think it is. (I do have a new textbook too). But anyway I am revising for the subject of experimental methods and something has thrown me right off. For an advantage for a laboratory experiment, it says the following “Forcing the pace of research: experimentation allows the pace of research to be forced making it unnecessary to wait for natural events to reproduce the appropriate scenario. As a result, it is possible to study behaviour which is uncommon, rarely observed by psychologists or which cannot be studied easily in another way, for example bystander attitudes to an emergency. Also, it permits the researcher to select when and possibly where to undertake an experiment” can someone please elaborate on this and suggest whether they think OCR would credit this and give it marks as it is a rather unusual and rare point to make in my opinion. Thanks a lot peeps xxxxx
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Aishraat
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(Original post by Aishraat)
Hello,

I have the mike Cardwell 1st edition psychology text book for a level. It’s old like 1996 but I don’t really care as long as it’s still relevant today which I think it is. (I do have a new textbook too). But anyway I am revising for the subject of experimental methods and something has thrown me right off. For an advantage for a laboratory experiment, it says the following “Forcing the pace of research: experimentation allows the pace of research to be forced making it unnecessary to wait for natural events to reproduce the appropriate scenario. As a result, it is possible to study behaviour which is uncommon, rarely observed by psychologists or which cannot be studied easily in another way, for example bystander attitudes to an emergency. Also, it permits the researcher to select when and possibly where to undertake an experiment” can someone please elaborate on this and suggest whether they think OCR would credit this and give it marks as it is a rather unusual and rare point to make in my opinion. Thanks a lot peeps xxxxx
Also, laboratory experiments take place on artificial environments but surely bystander attitudes to an emergency is a natural environment? Please help me out guys I am stumped. Thanks xx
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username4436068
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(Original post by Aishraat)
Hello,

I have the mike Cardwell 1st edition psychology text book for a level. It’s old like 1996 but I don’t really care as long as it’s still relevant today which I think it is. (I do have a new textbook too). But anyway I am revising for the subject of experimental methods and something has thrown me right off. For an advantage for a laboratory experiment, it says the following “Forcing the pace of research: experimentation allows the pace of research to be forced making it unnecessary to wait for natural events to reproduce the appropriate scenario. As a result, it is possible to study behaviour which is uncommon, rarely observed by psychologists or which cannot be studied easily in another way, for example bystander attitudes to an emergency. Also, it permits the researcher to select when and possibly where to undertake an experiment” can someone please elaborate on this and suggest whether they think OCR would credit this and give it marks as it is a rather unusual and rare point to make in my opinion. Thanks a lot peeps xxxxx
I have one of the newer psychology textbooks, and I think it makes a similar point but in a slightly different way. You could possibly argue that experiments allow researchers to manipulate variables and then test for cause and effect. This means they can control the environment of the experiment and control for extraneous variables.
In situations where manipulating the IV would be unethical, a field experiment would allow you to measure changes in the DV (because it uses naturally occurring IVs) an example of this would be the Baron Cohen core study where the IVs were whether participants either had autism, tourette's syndrome or no disorder.
I'm not sure if this helps!
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Aishraat
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(Original post by strawberrys0210)
I have one of the newer psychology textbooks, and I think it makes a similar point but in a slightly different way. You could possibly argue that experiments allow researchers to manipulate variables and then test for cause and effect. This means they can control the environment of the experiment and control for extraneous variables.
In situations where manipulating the IV would be unethical, a field experiment would allow you to measure changes in the DV (because it uses naturally occurring IVs) an example of this would be the Baron Cohen core study where the IVs were whether participants either had autism, tourette's syndrome or no disorder.
I'm not sure if this helps!
Thank you for your post! xxx
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username4436068
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(Original post by Aishraat)
Thank you for your post! xxx
no worries xx
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