Moe_00
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I need to build an electromagnet as part of my EPQ.
Currently the one I have starts to overheat/overload when I put in more than 4 volts. This means it is no where near powerful enough to do what I need.
The type of wire I have been using is not magnet wire, so now I realise that I need to order some but I am unsure of what specifications I need.
Is there any way to calculate how much force the magnet can generate? That way I can check if the wire I am ordering would be suitable or not.

Thanks for reading
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Joinedup
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Report 9 months ago
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(Original post by Mshabana)
I need to build an electromagnet as part of my EPQ.
Currently the one I have starts to overheat/overload when I put in more than 4 volts. This means it is no where near powerful enough to do what I need.
The type of wire I have been using is not magnet wire, so now I realise that I need to order some but I am unsure of what specifications I need.
Is there any way to calculate how much force the magnet can generate? That way I can check if the wire I am ordering would be suitable or not.

Thanks for reading
you can make an electromagnet stronger by increasing the number of turns or increasing the current.

IMO 1.0mm diameter magnet wire is a bit thick to work with and less than 0.5mm is getting a bit thin and fragile - in the UK you'd be asking for wire around 22 or 24 SWG enamel... without the additional thickness of PVC insulation you'll be able to get more turns into the same volume.

if yo're working with DC you can estimate the resistance from the length and diameter of wire used and therefore power dissipated at a given PD - or calculate from V and I readings taken with a multimeter. obviously you'll want to show that the PD you're using is 'safe'

calculate the field strength of an electro magnet (solenoid) using the formula here http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu.../solenoid.html

If you're still having problems with overheating you could try adjusting the 'duty cycle' of the electromagnet - i.e. switching it on and off to allow it to cool down.
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Moe_00
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Report Thread starter 9 months ago
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(Original post by Joinedup)
you can make an electromagnet stronger by increasing the number of turns or increasing the current.

IMO 1.0mm diameter magnet wire is a bit thick to work with and less than 0.5mm is getting a bit thin and fragile - in the UK you'd be asking for wire around 22 or 24 SWG enamel... without the additional thickness of PVC insulation you'll be able to get more turns into the same volume.

if yo're working with DC you can estimate the resistance from the length and diameter of wire used and therefore power dissipated at a given PD - or calculate from V and I readings taken with a multimeter. obviously you'll want to show that the PD you're using is 'safe'

calculate the field strength of an electro magnet (solenoid) using the formula here http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu.../solenoid.html

If you're still having problems with overheating you could try adjusting the 'duty cycle' of the electromagnet - i.e. switching it on and off to allow it to cool down.
Great, thank you!
Another quick question. Do you know how the field strength could translate in terms of the distance it can pull a certain mass from or the mass it can pull?
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