are folk at uni to get a degree or were they just too scared to get a job? Watch

SJW-
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i did 2 years of an accounting apprenticeship before uni it was tough but if i stuck for one or two years more money be high, id be qualified have a car, move out all good. but i went to uni and there were 'reasons' but i cant remember what they were. am man enough to admit now that the underlying reason i went was cos working was hard uni be fun. so one questions what about everyone else then. are the folk going to uni in sept really going to get a degree or did they just not want to meet the harsh realities of entry level employment or apprenticeships?
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quirky editor
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Having a degree usually leads to more pay and and a leg to fall on. Good apprenteships are rare.
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Notoriety
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The (entry-level and ordinary) professional world is significantly easier than uni. Don't kid yourself, kid.
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SJW-
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(Original post by Notoriety)
The (entry-level and ordinary) professional world is significantly easier than uni. Don't kid yourself, kid.
i think alot of folk chose uni cos its more familiar to school its a safe option - study, partying, 3 months holiday. plus get to move out and its fun. whereas employment 9-5 grind, not much pay, cant go out much, corporate bs. uni seems like a more attractive option. in my experience at uni it was abit of a party one. and i honestly think some of my flat mates and coursemates where here to **** around mainly than get their degree. a degree was an afterthought
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gjd800
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My degrees were way harder than the job I jacked to do them.

I had more money and was out on the piss/away on holiday way more when I was doing a **** (but not mentally taxing) job. Would have been easier for me to stay where I was.
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by SJW-)
i did 2 years of an accounting apprenticeship before uni it was tough but if i stuck for one or two years more money be high, id be qualified have a car, move out all good. but i went to uni and there were 'reasons' but i cant remember what they were. am man enough to admit now that the underlying reason i went was cos working was hard uni be fun. so one questions what about everyone else then. are the folk going to uni in sept really going to get a degree or did they just not want to meet the harsh realities of entry level employment or apprenticeships?
I am at uni because I am doing a course that requires a degree to qualify in the job. I have assignments to do whilst I am currently on placement working 37.5 hours a week, 12 hour shifts in a high pressure enviroment. I have had many jobs (mostly retail) before starting my course and there was no career development opportunites. I have also completed an apprenticeship the year before I started uni being paid £2.63 an hour. So I am not at uni for 'fun' or to avoid doing work, I have already experienced the harsh realities of working and completing an apprenticeship. So to answer your question no.
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SomMC1
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im going to uni as it's a requirement for any investment bank or any related job with banking in general. cant go there and just yolo it..
i know nothing about accounting & finance right now, so how could i even work at a bank without that knowledge? It's not about being scared & not being able to meet the harsh realities of employment, but about being qualified to get a proper job.
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Unistudent77
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Varies. Very grey.

Unlike the responses you’ve had so far, I went to uni as I felt I was too young to go straight into a career.

I agree that lots of people do pointless degrees and/or new degrees and/or masters due to wanting to run from their responsibilities.

Uni was a ****take. Party/chilling, tiny bit of work. Attended uni 3 hours a week.

Got my 2:1 and got onto a graduate scheme. Was a very harsh reality actually working.

Would not change it for the world as was a great time in my life and opened horizons etc.

Furthermore, it gave me the degree and that plus a year or so being employed in a poor job (high stress, pressure to sell, v poor pay) led to me seamlessly get a far better job.

I’m now on 30k a year, guaranteed without promotion to reach 41/42k.
Currently 28 days Annual leave but as of next year i’ll get 34.
6 days on shift, 4 off.

Certainly don’t think i’ll do this job forever but i’d envisage the next 3-5 years being in my current job, certainly same organisation and i’ll be pulling away from most people my age (low twenties)
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SJW-
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(Original post by SomMC1)
im going to uni as it's a requirement for any investment bank or any related job with banking in general. cant go there and just yolo it..
i know nothing about accounting & finance right now, so how could i even work at a bank without that knowledge? It's not about being scared & not being able to meet the harsh realities of employment, but about being qualified to get a proper job.
why not just do an acca (or even aat) accounting contract and become an accountant. 3 years no debt, salary, job, respected qualification recognised worldwide with big earnings. might be able to get into banking that way. or go to uni debt, no guaratee or becoming IB at end or even a job. plus if want to become an accountant further study is required. some of my friends went to uni and wanted to become ibs but got no where near
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Notoriety
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(Original post by SJW-)
i think alot of folk chose uni cos its more familiar to school its a safe option - study, partying, 3 months holiday. plus get to move out and its fun. whereas employment 9-5 grind, not much pay, cant go out much, corporate bs. uni seems like a more attractive option. in my experience at uni it was abit of a party one. and i honestly think some of my flat mates and coursemates where here to **** around mainly than get their degree. a degree was an afterthought
Nah you're just wanting to give yourself a pat on the back for doing basic ***** work, which you suppose is tremendously difficult because it was done ovr 9-5. My uni working week was more like 9-2am.
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SJW-
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Nah you're just wanting to give yourself a pat on the back for doing basic ***** work, which you suppose is tremendously difficult because it was done ovr 9-5. My uni working week was more like 9-2am.
9am to 2am seems pretty excessive. nah i felt unemployed for most of degree. i was studying 15 hours a week at most. add a few more hours on during coursework season. then ok maybe 12 hour days few days up to exam.

the point here is that i think a good fair chunk of those going to uni are there because like uni student says to run away from responsibilities. millennials are soft and snowflake like uni is fun its safe its familiar. compared to the scary world of work
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Notoriety
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(Original post by SJW-)
9am to 2am seems pretty excessive. nah i felt unemployed for most of degree. i was studying 15 hours a week at most. add a few more hours on during coursework season. then ok maybe 12 hour days few days up to exam.

the point here is that i think a good fair chunk of those going to uni are there because like uni student says to run away from responsibilities. millennials are soft and snowflake like uni is fun its safe its familiar. compared to the scary world of work
If you're doing sociology at Derby, then you might feel unemployed at uni and afterwards.
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Moments
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The whole "skipping uni" thing might apply to the arts or the social sciences, but not viable if you want to become a Doctor or an Engineer.

Agree if you go to uni, piss around and scrape your 2:1 by a couple of percent, then you'd have to question why you went to uni. However, to average an 90%+ 1st requires consistent effort far beyond any entry level job.
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J-SP
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(Original post by Notoriety)
The (entry-level and ordinary) professional world is significantly easier than uni. Don't kid yourself, kid.
I don’t agree with that.

Uni is difficult if you don’t know how to be an adult and look after yourself. Apart from that it is a lot easier than the world of work compared to an apprentice who is working and studying.
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J-SP
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(Original post by SomMC1)
im going to uni as it's a requirement for any investment bank or any related job with banking in general. cant go there and just yolo it..
i know nothing about accounting & finance right now, so how could i even work at a bank without that knowledge? It's not about being scared & not being able to meet the harsh realities of employment, but about being qualified to get a proper job.
You know there’s plenty of jobs in Investment Banking that don’t require a degree right?
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Drewski
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(Original post by SJW-)
the point here is that i think a good fair chunk of those going to uni are there because like uni student says to run away from responsibilities. millennials are soft and snowflake like uni is fun its safe its familiar. compared to the scary world of work
:troll:

Complete balls. Notoriety is absolutely bang on.
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J-SP
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Nah you're just wanting to give yourself a pat on the back for doing basic ***** work, which you suppose is tremendously difficult because it was done ovr 9-5. My uni working week was more like 9-2am.
That’s very atypical hours for a student. Even if it was more typical, it would include massive periods of procrastination during it - starting at 9am and finishing at 2.00am wouldn’t be working full stop throughout that period - anyone trying to even attempt that would be pretty unproductive that no wonder they had to work through that period.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by J-SP)
That’s very atypical hours for a student. Even if it was more typical, it would include massive periods of procrastination during it - starting at 9am and finishing at 2.00am wouldn’t be working full stop throughout that period - anyone trying to even attempt that would be pretty unproductive that no wonder they had to work through that period.
I know lots of people who did it. In academia generally, long hours are a source of pride. Saw it amongst my law peers quite a bit, who seemed to be the greatest masochists. Plus 9-5 includes breaks, so I trust that people doing uni work also should get a couple.
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Yaqeen2
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I certainly believe there is at least some truth to the op’s posts
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Yaqeen2
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(Original post by J-SP)
I don’t agree with that.

Uni is difficult if you don’t know how to be an adult and look after yourself. Apart from that it is a lot easier than the world of work compared to an apprentice who is working and studying.
Why is the world of work more difficult?
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