Too late for training contract? Should I give up and consider this a sign? Watch

lowkeylawyer
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
So I finished the self-funded LPC a year ago with a 69%. Went to a Russel Group uni with a 2:1 and graduated in 2016. I have been applying for training contracts for nearly 4 years now. I have work experience in some top firms (including a MC) in about 3 countries as I grew up around a couple of different places. Heaps of leadership/society experience at uni as well. I am working in tech right now (not in the UK) as that was an interest of mine as well, whilst making legal applications on the side. I however seem to have NO luck at all. I have possibly made nearly 50 applications so far in these four years, with only 2 interviews. I have constantly been in touch with my uni careers service, Aspiring Solicitors, SEO etc to have them look over my applications - and none of them can find any issue with it. Same with my peers that have TC's. I only keep getting silly advice like "use this word instead of that word to convey your message better".

At this point I have tried various different strategies - I have applied to the big firms as they have more training contracts and can possibly sponsor my visa. (I am an international student). I have also applied to more niche firms within the tech area, and still no luck - not even interviews. I am honestly quite frustrated at this point - simply because I have done everything in my power (grades, work experience, extra curriculars, some big names on CV etc) and I am getting absolutely no where. Is this normal? Should I keep trying to apply, or am I just knocking on a closed door? Any advice is welcome please!
0
reply
Blann
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
I will be frank. The door you’re trying to open is all but shut to you.

Let’s look at the facts. You require visa support because you’re (presumably) non-EU. You’ve already done your LPC, so you’re no longer on a student visa. You’re also currently working outside the U.K. Firms will therefore have to go through a very laborious process to have your work visa approved. They will have to justify why they’re hiring you instead of the thousands of TC applicants already applying from within the U.K/EU. It’s almost impossible unless you have something truly exceptional on your CV, or the stars align and you somehow have something they need.

You’ve already lost 4 years. Time is precious. You should consider qualifying in your home jurisdiction (or any jurisdiction in which you have the right to work) and then transferring via the SQE in a few years. That might actually be more expedient in the longer term.

EDIT: I also saw that you made 50 applications over the past 4 years. That’s far too few. The general advice on this forum seems to be that applicants should focus on fewer but highly tailored applications. That’s only half-correct for internationals. Internationals must send as many highly tailored applications as they can. It takes a lot more time and effort, and it’s dificult to balance that with other commitments, but it’s the least you can do if you’re serious about staying on after your studies. Obviously, it’s too little too late now.
Last edited by Blann; 1 month ago
1
reply
jacketpotato
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Sorry to hear about this. There isn't anything obvious that jumps out as more you could be doing.

You could try applying for formal vacation schemes as well as directly to TCs I suppose?

A lot of the larger firms tend to recruit their trainees pre-LPC. A lot of the smaller firms are less willing to sponsor overseas applicants for visas.
0
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Apply to VSs lol

We can't help unless we've seen your application form
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
lowkeylawyer
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by Blann)
I will be frank. The door you’re trying to open is all but shut to you.

Let’s look at the facts. You require visa support because you’re (presumably) non-EU. You’ve already done your LPC, so you’re no longer on a student visa. You’re also currently working outside the U.K. Firms will therefore have to go through a very laborious process to have your work visa approved. They will have to justify why they’re hiring you instead of the thousands of TC applicants already applying from within the U.K/EU. It’s almost impossible unless you have something truly exceptional on your CV, or the stars align and you somehow have something they need.

You’ve already lost 4 years. Time is precious. You should consider qualifying in your home jurisdiction (or any jurisdiction in which you have the right to work) and then transferring via the SQE in a few years. That might actually be more expedient in the longer term.

EDIT: I also saw that you made 50 applications over the past 4 years. That’s far too few. The general advice on this forum seems to be that applicants should focus on fewer but highly tailored applications. That’s only half-correct for internationals. Internationals must send as many highly tailored applications as they can. It takes a lot more time and effort, and it’s dificult to balance that with other commitments, but it’s the least you can do if you’re serious about staying on after your studies. Obviously, it’s too little too late now.
Hey! thanks for your response. Im not sure thats an entirely fair assesment though because most firms dont really ask for your visa status until after/during interview. Plus the ones that do state that it does not affect your application at the screening stage - so I am assuming that the issue is with my app because I am not even being considered for interviews. Interestingly, there was this case (against Osborne Clarke if I remember correctly) that actually made is discriminatory to not invite candidates to interview based on their visa status.

Qualifying in my home jurisdiction isn't an option as I don't live where my passport is from (I work in another country as an expat) - so now I am considering applying to Dubai TC's and other consulting/research roles.
0
reply
lowkeylawyer
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by lowkeylawyer)
Hey! thanks for your response. Im not sure thats an entirely fair assesment though because most firms dont really ask for your visa status until after/during interview. Plus the ones that do state that it does not affect your application at the screening stage - so I am assuming that the issue is with my app because I am not even being considered for interviews. Interestingly, there was this case (against Osborne Clarke if I remember correctly) that actually made is discriminatory to not invite candidates to interview based on their visa status.

Qualifying in my home jurisdiction isn't an option as I don't live where my passport is from (I work in another country as an expat) - so now I am considering applying to Dubai TC's and other consulting/research roles.
(Original post by Blann)
I will be frank. The door you’re trying to open is all but shut to you.

Let’s look at the facts. You require visa support because you’re (presumably) non-EU. You’ve already done your LPC, so you’re no longer on a student visa. You’re also currently working outside the U.K. Firms will therefore have to go through a very laborious process to have your work visa approved. They will have to justify why they’re hiring you instead of the thousands of TC applicants already applying from within the U.K/EU. It’s almost impossible unless you have something truly exceptional on your CV, or the stars align and you somehow have something they need.

You’ve already lost 4 years. Time is precious. You should consider qualifying in your home jurisdiction (or any jurisdiction in which you have the right to work) and then transferring via the SQE in a few years. That might actually be more expedient in the longer term.

EDIT: I also saw that you made 50 applications over the past 4 years. That’s far too few. The general advice on this forum seems to be that applicants should focus on fewer but highly tailored applications. That’s only half-correct for internationals. Internationals must send as many highly tailored applications as they can. It takes a lot more time and effort, and it’s dificult to balance that with other commitments, but it’s the least you can do if you’re serious about staying on after your studies. Obviously, it’s too little too late now.
FYI here is the lik to that ruling- https://www.law.com/legal-week/sites...20190016231425
0
reply
Blann
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by lowkeylawyer)
Hey! thanks for your response. Im not sure thats an entirely fair assesment though because most firms dont really ask for your visa status until after/during interview. Plus the ones that do state that it does not affect your application at the screening stage - so I am assuming that the issue is with my app because I am not even being considered for interviews. Interestingly, there was this case (against Osborne Clarke if I remember correctly) that actually made is discriminatory to not invite candidates to interview based on their visa status.

Qualifying in my home jurisdiction isn't an option as I don't live where my passport is from (I work in another country as an expat) - so now I am considering applying to Dubai TC's and other consulting/research roles.
That’s not accurate for many of these these bigger firms that you say you’ve applied to. Their application forms specifically ask whether you require visa support. I know because I’ve filled up many of those same forms.

You have also misread the Osborne Clarke judgment. Outright refusing to consider international applicants is discriminatory. Taking visa status and whether they can satisfy the Resident Labour Market Test (which they will need to do for a successful candidate not on a student visa immediately prior to the start of the training contract) into account when deciding whether to advance a candidate is not.
Last edited by Blann; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
lowkeylawyer
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by Blann)
That’s not accurate for many of these these bigger firms that you say you’ve applied to. Their application forms specifically ask whether you require visa support. I know because I’ve filled up many of those same forms.

You have also misread the Osborne Clarke judgment. Outright refusing to consider international applicants is discriminatory. Taking visa status and whether they can satisfy the Resident Labour Market Test (which they will need to do for a successful candidate not on a student visa immediately prior to the start of the training contract) into account when deciding whether to advance a candidate is not.
Gotcha - I guess there's many factors @ play here and a huge part of luck/a numbers game which just has me really discouraged. I'll try applying to some more niche tech firms like Bristows etc as well.
0
reply
flatlined
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
International firms take international students all the time, I know some US firms which are made up almost entirely of foreigners from HK, Singapore etc. I don't know if/how the situation complicates with having done the LPC.

Also what someone said above about VSs. Students are really so dumb; all of the internet resources you should have researched tell you that basically all the TC offers go to VSs. Pretty much all US firms take nearly or entirely 100% of their intake off VSs. And you're specifically talking about direct TC apps.

Also don't do law, it sucks. If you do it, do it in Dubai for tax reasons and it's easier to get for you. Consulting is also much better.

This is 90% accurate for London as well (it's not quite that bad imo):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forum...p?f=4&t=261392
1
reply
jacketpotato
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
Meh. I am more senior than you flatlined, also working in corporate.

I actually enjoy my job. Maybe I'm just mad.

I still don't understand why you choose to stay in a role you hate, when there are so many interesting opportunities out there. Is your life really going to be that different if you get paid £150k rather than £200k? Take the pay cut, and get the better work life balance and the more interesting work FFS
0
reply
Blann
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
The international students who are hired by international firms in the vast majority of cases found their TCs while they were still studying their undergrad in the UK. Once they graduate, they immediately commence the LPC and extend their student visas. It’s administratively much easier for firms to convert a student visa into a work visa (e.g. there’s no need to satisfy the resident labour market test), so firms have much less reason to discriminate.

Since the OP is not on a student visa, and has already done the LPC, the same route is not open to them.
Last edited by Blann; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Is the plastic tax enough to protect the environment?

Yes (13)
5.6%
No (219)
94.4%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed