avasingh
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#61
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do u know which house you’re in yet?
(Original post by fangers)
the acceptance email said '8 A/7 grades at GCSE/IGCSE, of which at least 4 are A*/8-9 (preferably in the chosen A Level subjects)' so not too bad, anybody who can get an offer will probably be able to meet those. i don't know much about the scholarship but i think you just need to perform very well across the board in exams and interviews as well as the TSA which you have to do. you just need to tick the box to say you want to be considered for the scholarship when applying
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fangers
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#62
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(Original post by xanx)
How were your interviews and the TSA?
they were actually quite enjoyable, much better than sitting in an exam hall with 700 other students for 4 hours lol. for me as a humanities student they were more discussion about general topics than answering specific questions, and didn't (to me at least) really feel like formal interview. and my language ones served as oral exams so they were entirely in another language. basically just an opportunity to nerd out with whatever teacher about how much you enjoy your subjects. the TSA i didn't do any prep for but it's honestly just common sense with some maths and you can definitely find past papers online, and it's not a full TSA because it's only 1 hour long.
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fangers
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(Original post by avasingh)
do u know which house you’re in yet?
yep! they let you know which house you are in after you accept your offer. and there are 2 induction days before the start of term mostly in your houses, one to meet only the other new students and one where you also meet the current students that will be in your year. + you and your parents have a meeting with your housemaster in the summer
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avasingh
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#64
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which one are you in, I know some people there?
(Original post by fangers)
yep! they let you know which house you are in after you accept your offer. and there are 2 induction days before the start of term mostly in your houses, one to meet only the other new students and one where you also meet the current students that will be in your year. + you and your parents have a meeting with your housemaster in the summer
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kiwisandchoc
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(Original post by fangers)
i did french, spanish, history and geography. the exams weren't actually too bad; i think with humanities there's a lot more leeway and room for discussion/to impress. all the exams were pretty straightforward, because i did 4 essay subjects they were more difficult to prepare for because there's no such thing as common content for everybody when it comes to history, geography etc. but there is for maths and sciences. i didn't do a lot of prep because i kind of went into the whole process with a 'if it happens it happens' attitude, i was reading a lot of books outside of the curriculum anyway and skimmed over some of my gcse syllabus (although i actually found i used almost none of my gcse knowledge and a lot more of the stuff i'd learnt myself through my own interests!) important thing is that the exams are NOT gcse style at all, they're actually tests of aptitude more so than knowledge. some of my friends who did other subjects said the maths exams are more UMC style and the science questions were applying gcse level concepts to weird/unseen contexts to test your understanding of them. if you enjoy your subjects and have a passion for them you might wind up finding the process quite fun!!
Hi there I was just wondering about the Spanish exam. On their website they mentioned an extension at the end of the paper, would it be possible to understand if you are not fluent and is it above GCSE level?

Thanks
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depreshun master
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#66
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My brother went to Westminster and said most of the girls that joined in sixth form said the entrance exam was impossible to prepare for. You can try reading around etc but they’ve specifically designed it so you can’t prepare for it.
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fangers
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(Original post by kiwisandchoc)
Hi there I was just wondering about the Spanish exam. On their website they mentioned an extension at the end of the paper, would it be possible to understand if you are not fluent and is it above GCSE level?

Thanks
this is such a good question because they only updated the website this year to include the info about the extension - it wasn't on there when i applied so i wasn't expecting it at all and it was a bit of a shock for me turning the page from nice gcse level translations to see a two page lorca poem and an essay question!!! it is definitely above gcse level because it's literary analysis, gcse language exams are horrendously easy which i suppose is the point of putting in something far more difficult. obviously as a non native speaker with not a lot of experience with literature it was more difficult than the rest of the paper but you can write quite a lot with bits and pieces that you've managed to vaguely understand. what they do is they ask you to tick a box if you're native and if you're not and you still do the extension anyway then you won't get penalised on what you write in the extension!!! so i would say go for it if you have the time left which you probably will, but don't stress about it and focus more on the first bit of the paper which you will definitely be marked on
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kiwisandchoc
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#68
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Thank you that really helped
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DiviFilius14
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#69
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(Original post by fangers)
i did french, spanish, history and geography. the exams weren't actually too bad; i think with humanities there's a lot more leeway and room for discussion/to impress. all the exams were pretty straightforward, because i did 4 essay subjects they were more difficult to prepare for because there's no such thing as common content for everybody when it comes to history, geography etc. but there is for maths and sciences. i didn't do a lot of prep because i kind of went into the whole process with a 'if it happens it happens' attitude, i was reading a lot of books outside of the curriculum anyway and skimmed over some of my gcse syllabus (although i actually found i used almost none of my gcse knowledge and a lot more of the stuff i'd learnt myself through my own interests!) important thing is that the exams are NOT gcse style at all, they're actually tests of aptitude more so than knowledge. some of my friends who did other subjects said the maths exams are more UMC style and the science questions were applying gcse level concepts to weird/unseen contexts to test your understanding of them. if you enjoy your subjects and have a passion for them you might wind up finding the process quite fun!!
What standard was the French exam? iGCSE or more towards AS?
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fangers
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(Original post by DiviFilius14)
What standard was the French exam? iGCSE or more towards AS?
i really couldn't say; i didn't find it particularly difficult and neither did my friends - the french exam was definitely easier than the spanish! i did GCSE and the comprehension they gave us was definitely harder than what i ended up sitting in june. it was actually, incredibly enough, lifted straight out of the french challenge paper for the 13+ scholarship like 2 years ago which was on the website at the time that i applied! so i guess you could look at a few of those to get some examples of the level of difficulty they might give you. the fill in grammar section was super straightforward, there's nothing like that in GCSE but it wasn't complicated, just finicky examples to try and catch you out. and the essay was just an essay but the titles were more thought provoking so you could write a lot more and show off a bit. keep in mind that they actually don't care about what grammar you know, just that what you do know, you know well. i was given some incorrect sentences in my interview to mark and they said i wouldn't be penalised because the point wasn't to judge my ability but to check what my school had covered. so don't worry too much about the grammar bits.
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Chickenjaofrazi1
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(Original post by Mintiee)
So I am not from UK meaning I don't know a lot about the schools there, but I did heard about Concord! I'm really interested, so, say if I want to go there for my 6th form, which subjects would you recommend and which one you wouldn't? Also, how is the environment there? ie. the facilities/teachers/competitiveness/friends.
How many subjects are the student there taking? (3,4,5?) I'm thinking about taking Math, *maybe* FurtherMath, Physics and something else?
I think what is important to consider is how hard you are willing to work, and if you don't mind intensive studying (there are saturday tests which everyone hates) - but 2 years isn' that long so it's not so bad.
Also, if you are a person who needs to be quite interested in what you study to succeed, or if you are a person who is able to power through- knowing that there will be a positive outcome.
Personally, my advice would only ever be to study subjects which interest you, because they are likely to be the subjects you will pursue later on in life and in university. (Therefore will come into use).
If you are unsure of how useful a subject is, I recommend thinking about how useful the subject will be to YOU in the future e.g. will you use it in your day to day life? Is the subject required for the course you want? do you want to become an expert in it? -rather than- will the universities like me more because of it...
When it comes to non-subject specific subjects such as law, any academic subject will do- they just care about the A's. Also, doing one fluffy subject never hurts as long as you have 3 academic ones.
I would only advise doing more than 3 and a half subjects if you are aiming for Oxbridge. People usually taking 4 will drop a subject after their offer, because universities will only ask for 3 subjects.
If you are from Asia, no worries you will fit in well- it is hugely international!!
Opportunities aren't great if you are really into sport though, mainly because people priotise their academics more. It is a really friendly community, and the upper sixth formers will take you under their wing and are really chill. Because of this, all the younger kids are inspired to be just as friendly. Sometimes though this can lead to a little bit of a fake vibe, and sometimes because everything seems all cheery and good- teachers don't see that not everything is perfect and a lot of students struggle with stress and anxiety which is overlooked.
It's very competitive- which means you do have to get used to not being at the top, and can lead to a lack of appraisal from the teachers who are so used to smart students, they take your efforts to study for granted.
The student teacher relationships tend to be quite good becuase they are really respevtful towards you and treat you like an adult in sixth form rather than a kid.

To sum up, there are definitely pros and cons to cc, and it depends on you as a person whether the pros outweigh the cons. I feel I came out of cc a better person as it taught me a lot of social skills, and a lot about different cultures which is a big pro. I think the freedom and independence helps you mature.
For me though, as a day student, I found it difficult to integrate with the borders, and because I started age 13, the intensity of studying and Saturday tests were too much for me and I felt like I had no life outside of studying. Also, I am only average smartness, (slightly above in UK, way below in Asia) so I personally found the teaching not so good because they sort of assume you get the hang of it quickly and skip the basics... but they offer good handouts and feedback- it's more of a push you get from cc than good teaching in my opinion, unless you are so lucky to get one of the good teachers.
Also, I am quite an all-rounder, and as cc is very academic orientated, you sort of get pushed in the academic direction due to the lack of facilities and encouragement for creative subjects.
So although I do have some good memories made there, I wouldn't go back or send my kids there.
But... we are different people!! and I definitely know lots of people who loved their time in sixth form there, and miss it lots. As you are only going for 2 years, I can imagine you will be fine.
I recommend it if 1. you are either very smart or don't mind being at the bottom 2. can cope with stress well 3. are a very sociable person 4. Work hard and don't mind spending your friday nights stuyding 5. Are international 6. want to have an academic based career 7. need to be pushed 8. don't mind a non- british experience
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DiviFilius14
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#72
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Thank you very much! How important is the Personal Statement? I am, admittedly, not very musical or sporty, so I will have very little to write in these sections... will this put me at a major disadvantage or is sufficient performance in the entrance exams, TSA and interviews enough?
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EmGS
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(Original post by DiviFilius14)
Thank you very much! How important is the Personal Statement? I am, admittedly, not very musical or sporty, so I will have very little to write in these sections... will this put me at a major disadvantage or is sufficient performance in the entrance exams, TSA and interviews enough?
I think the order of importance is doing well in the exams, then the general interview then the subject interviews and TSA. For the personal statement, it’s more to give them something to talk about in the general interview. Even if you’re not musical or sporty (i’m neither), anything you’re passionate about will do. It’s worth thinking about any extracurriculars that you do beforehand and trying to think of things to write for the personal statement, but it’s not the end of the world if you haven’t got very much to say for it.
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fangers
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(Original post by DiviFilius14)
Thank you very much! How important is the Personal Statement? I am, admittedly, not very musical or sporty, so I will have very little to write in these sections... will this put me at a major disadvantage or is sufficient performance in the entrance exams, TSA and interviews enough?
the personal statement is of relatively very little importance! you might not even get asked about it in interview. i doubt all 700 something applicants are olympians who also play 60 instruments so i wouldn't worry about it too much; just write down anything you can think of. if you do well in all other aspects there is absolutely no reason you wouldn't make it to interviews or get a place. for me it mostly acted as interview filler but if you don't have a lot to discuss they definitely won't be short on other things to ask you about
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arisamalao59
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Hello! I'm also thinking of applying to Westminster for 6th Form(2020-2022) for English Lit, Latin, History and German. What are the exams and interviews in these particular subjects and how can I prepare for them?
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EmGS
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(Original post by arisamalao59)
Hello! I'm also thinking of applying to Westminster for 6th Form(2020-2022) for English Lit, Latin, History and German. What are the exams and interviews in these particular subjects and how can I prepare for them?
Overall they’re very hard to prepare for. Make sure you’re familiar with as much of the GCSE as possible (if ur from the UK). Even for the same subjects, different people have very different experiences depending on who’s interviewing you. For English, make sure you’re comfortable talking about the books/plays you enjoy and/or have studied recently at school, and make sure you can analyse a poem on the spot. The exam is usually an essay analysing a text and it’s pretty standard stuff. For history it’s a lot different and you might want to think about the wider importance of history on top of just knowing a lot of history. The important thing is to be able to prove your interest in the subject. Latin you need to know your grammar and vocab, and be able to analyse a piece of classically based literature (the text is in english though). For the interview they will most likely ask you about the set texts you’ve studied at school and ask you to translate a hard bit of latin. Don’t be afraid to ask them for help, but make sure you can pick up their hints quickly. German should be grammar and vocab as well, try and get as comfortable speaking it as possible. Hope this helps.
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hiorhey
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#77
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Hey! Could someone give me more info on appying for Art at Westminster (I’m aware that there is no exam, instead you show your portfolio to the teacher- how does this work?) Any advice? I was also wondering what the interviews are like? Thanks
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arisamalao59
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(Original post by EmGS)
Overall they’re very hard to prepare for. Make sure you’re familiar with as much of the GCSE as possible (if ur from the UK). Even for the same subjects, different people have very different experiences depending on who’s interviewing you. For English, make sure you’re comfortable talking about the books/plays you enjoy and/or have studied recently at school, and make sure you can analyse a poem on the spot. The exam is usually an essay analysing a text and it’s pretty standard stuff. For history it’s a lot different and you might want to think about the wider importance of history on top of just knowing a lot of history. The important thing is to be able to prove your interest in the subject. Latin you need to know your grammar and vocab, and be able to analyse a piece of classically based literature (the text is in english though). For the interview they will most likely ask you about the set texts you’ve studied at school and ask you to translate a hard bit of latin. Don’t be afraid to ask them for help, but make sure you can pick up their hints quickly. German should be grammar and vocab as well, try and get as comfortable speaking it as possible. Hope this helps.
Yes , Thank you so much
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DiviFilius14
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#79
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Hey everyone! How did you guys find the exams today?
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17mshabab
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Devastating
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