Biological Anthropolgy Watch

zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
I want to go to University of Dundee in Scotland to do Foensic Anthropology but I don't know which A-levels apart from biology to choose. I am going to choose English lit but don't know about the remaining choice and reserve. What would help me get in?
Last edited by zoe260; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
NukaCola
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Look at the course requirements? Chemistry may be helpful.
0
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#3
Thanks.... let's hope i can get a 6 in maths and chem

(Original post by NukaCola)
Look at the course requirements? Chemistry may be helpful.
0
reply
artful_lounger
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
Chemistry isn't really relevant for biological anthropology - it's not biomedical sciences; outside of some basic elements of material composition and isotope dating there isn't anything relevant for the vast majority of biological anthropologists (or archaeologists, for that matter) who don't normally do especially detailed physiology work. Any option is really fine though, just pick whatever you're strongest in - if this is chemistry that's fine, if not then don't take it (particularly as A-level Chemistry is not an easy option by any means). That said, Dundee's course is in forensic anthropology, and might entail more chemical elements than a typical biological anthropology/human sciences/archaeology course as such (but I still doubt it, looking at the course structure).

Outside of that particular course, since biological anthropology is ostensibly a social science, or at least closely related to social sciences, taking a social science option might be sensible (although having essay writing background from English lit will be sufficient, you might develop the kinds of thinking used in social analysis more with a social science option). Something like sociology or psychology might be relevant and of interest, for example. Alternately, languages are always useful, particularly if you wanted to continue in academia in anthropology generally.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 4 weeks ago
1
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Chemistry isn't really relevant for biological anthropology - it's not biomedical sciences; outside of some basic elements of material composition and isotope dating there isn't anything relevant for the vast majority of biological anthropologists (or archaeologists, for that matter) who don't normally do especially detailed physiology work. Any option is really fine though, just pick whatever you're strongest in - if this is chemistry that's fine, if not then don't take it (particularly as A-level Chemistry is not an easy option by any means). That said, Dundee's course is in forensic anthropology, and might entail more chemical elements than a typical biological anthropology/human sciences/archaeology course as such (but I still doubt it, looking at the course structure).

Outside of that particular course, since biological anthropology is ostensibly a social science, or at least closely related to social sciences, taking a social science option might be sensible (although having essay writing background from English lit will be sufficient, you might develop the kinds of thinking used in social analysis more with a social science option). Something like sociology or psychology might be relevant and of interest, for example. Alternately, languages are always useful, particularly if you wanted to continue in academia in anthropology generally.
yeah i know that it is forensic and that is what i hope to do as a career path sometime after uni but my science teacher told me that they are the same thing.... This is all confusing me as before, I only knew of forensic and now there is even more. My science teacher has advised me not to choose Chemistry although it is one of my best subjects due to the work load and I'm worried that I have to apply for other places and now I'm being told not to choose it. This is my main problem.
0
reply
m0209
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
biology and english literature are great subject choices so far

i think with any anthropological course, social sciences are always useful to take. psychology has overlaps with forensics and criminal cases (e.g - restorative justice, reliability of eye witness testimonies, cesare lombroso, the biological causes of criminality). other social sciences like geography can be useful for anthropology in general, covering topics like cultural diffusion, cultural erosion and colonisation.

if you have the option to take an EPQ, then take it! you can do it on the subject you wish to go into in the future.
0
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by m0209)
biology and english literature are great subject choices so far

i think with any anthropological course, social sciences are always useful to take. psychology has overlaps with forensics and criminal cases (e.g - restorative justice, reliability of eye witness testimonies, cesare lombroso, the biological causes of criminality). other social sciences like geography can be useful for anthropology in general, covering topics like cultural diffusion, cultural erosion and colonisation.

if you have the option to take an EPQ, then take it! you can do it on the subject you wish to go into in the future.
Hi, thanks for the advice, what is an EPQ? I've never been told about anything like that before. Also, would criminology be useful seeing as I am going to put it as my reserve and it's offered at my school? Thanks
0
reply
m0209
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by zoe260)
Hi, thanks for the advice, what is an EPQ? I've never been told about anything like that before. Also, would criminology be useful seeing as I am going to put it as my reserve and it's offered at my school? Thanks
hi! an EPQ is an extended project that most sixth forms offer (check if yours does). it's an essay of 5000 words that you can independently complete on any topic. just like any other subject, you get a grade at the end of it (e.g - A*, A, B etc) and it is an extra qualification. as someone who has applied to study anthropology this year at uni, i found taking an epq extremely useful, as i got to show my interest in the subject directly.

here is some more information on it:
https://www.ucas.com/connect/blogs/w...e-epq-advice-1
https://www.cife.org.uk/article/sixt...qualification/

criminology seems like a fitting choice for forensic/biological anthropology if interested in crime! biology, english lit and criminology will definitely work
0
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by m0209)
hi! an EPQ is an extended project that most sixth forms offer (check if yours does). it's an essay of 5000 words that you can independently complete on any topic. just like any other subject, you get a grade at the end of it (e.g - A*, A, B etc) and it is an extra qualification. as someone who has applied to study anthropology this year at uni, i found taking an epq extremely useful, as i got to show my interest in the subject directly.

here is some more information on it:
https://www.ucas.com/connect/blogs/w...e-epq-advice-1
https://www.cife.org.uk/article/sixt...qualification/

criminology seems like a fitting choice for forensic/biological anthropology if interested in crime! biology, english lit and criminology will definitely work
You do anthropology? Which type?

Thank you for this and i'll check on Monday
0
reply
m0209
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by zoe260)
You do anthropology? Which type?

Thank you for this and i'll check on Monday
i've applied for social anthropology / joint courses of law+anthropology for 2019 entry (in year 13 right now).
0
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by m0209)
i've applied for social anthropology / joint courses of law+anthropology for 2019 entry (in year 13 right now).
good luck.... im so scared for my gcse's especially after mock resuls where i did very badly, only just passed most subjects. failed bio tho and am disappointed about that but i still have time. have fun with anthropology, tell me what it's like when you sart
0
reply
m0209
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by zoe260)
good luck.... im so scared for my gcse's especially after mock resuls where i did very badly, only just passed most subjects. failed bio tho and am disappointed about that but i still have time. have fun with anthropology, tell me what it's like when you sart
i understand how nerve-wracking it must be. use your mock results as motivation to do better for your real exams! go through the subjects you feel the most worried for, start refreshing your mind on the most complicated aspects and do past papers for your subjects to see where the gaps in your knowledge are. also, your teachers are there to help you! ask them for advice and help when needed.

if you need any more help regarding a levels/universities, let me know
1
reply
zoe260
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by m0209)
i understand how nerve-wracking it must be. use your mock results as motivation to do better for your real exams! go through the subjects you feel the most worried for, start refreshing your mind on the most complicated aspects and do past papers for your subjects to see where the gaps in your knowledge are. also, your teachers are there to help you! ask them for advice and help when needed.

if you need any more help regarding a levels/universities, let me know
thank you so much
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Roehampton
    Department of Media, Culture and Language; School of Education; Business School Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Feb '19
  • Edge Hill University
    Undergraduate and Postgraduate - Campus Tour Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Feb '19
  • University of Kent
    Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities Further education
    Tue, 19 Feb '19

Do you give blood?

Yes (61)
8.38%
I used to but I don't now (18)
2.47%
No, but I want to start (272)
37.36%
No, I am unable to (173)
23.76%
No, I chose not to (204)
28.02%

Watched Threads

View All