B1446 – Sunday Trading Hours Bill 2019 Watch

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Saracen's Fez
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B1446 – Sunday Trading Hours Bill 2019, TSR Libertarian Party
Sunday Trading Hours Act 2019

An Act to allow businesses to decide their opening hours on Sundays

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 Repeals
(1) The Sunday Trading Act 1994 is hereby repealed.

2 Short title, Commencement, Extent
(1) This act may be cited as the Sunday Trading Hours Act 2019
(2) This act comes into force upon Royal Assent
(3) This act extends to the UK


Notes
Under the Sunday Trading Act 1994 the limits on shop opening hours are:

Small shops (under 280 sq m/3,000 sq ft) - no restrictions on opening
Large shops (over 280 sq m/3,000 sq ft) - Monday to Saturday - no restrictions; Sunday - Opening for 6 continual hours only, between 10am and 6pm; Easter Sunday - closed

We believe that the limit on business hours in the modern times is archaic and distinctly anti-business. Business should be free to decide their opening hours.

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1994/20/contents
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Connor27
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Aye.

Only a small item but a helpful one for our economy.
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Jammy Duel
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Having looked at the legislation in question (something tells me nobody else will as nobody seems to have ever done it before) in its entirety I do not see any severe, detrimental, and unintended consequences from this, although I am happy to be corrected
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Miss Maddie
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I don't see any reason why shops shouldn't open on Sunday if they want
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SoggyCabbages
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There is no large economic benefit to relaxing Sunday trading laws, if anything, it can damage smaller businesses.

Nay.

Furthermore, making Sunday a mandatory working day this can infringe on the rights of religious people working who may be bound by contract to now work on this day.
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Aph
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(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
There is no large economic benefit to relaxing Sunday trading laws, if anything, it can damage smaller businesses.

Nay.

Furthermore, making Sunday a mandatory working day this can infringe on the rights of religious people working who may be bound by contract to now work on this day.
As opposed to Muslims, Jews and every other person who doesn’t observe on Sunday?
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SoggyCabbages
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(Original post by Aph)
As opposed to Muslims, Jews and every other person who doesn’t observe on Sunday?
Sorry, but what's your point?
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ns_2
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Aye; businesses ought to be free to operate on Sundays, if they so wish.
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Andrew97
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A strong Aye from me. This could be very good for business.
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LeapingLucy
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Aye. Hopefully this will, at least to some extent, help the high street compete with online firms.
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Saunders16
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No, this is an unwise decision. This would extend the advantage inherent to large businesses and have a large cost towards smaller businesses. We ought to be encouraging people to trade, especially smaller businesses, with the high street struggling as it is.

I urge my fellow members to vote this down.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
There is no large economic benefit to relaxing Sunday trading laws, if anything, it can damage smaller businesses.

Nay.

Furthermore, making Sunday a mandatory working day this can infringe on the rights of religious people working who may be bound by contract to now work on this day.
Whether there is a large economic benefit or not is irrelevant imo, as long as there is no economic detriment. As for infringing upon the rights of the religious as Aph has already pointed out there are other religions that do not observe Sunday as a day of rest and must therefore work on their rest day, alternatively the case is that they don't work on their religious rest day because it is also their work rest day, there is no reason why contracts can not allow those who wish to observe Sunday as a day of rest to do so, if this were a serious argument we would also not see the exeptions for small stores.
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SoggyCabbages
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Whether there is a large economic benefit or not is irrelevant imo, as long as there is no economic detriment. As for infringing upon the rights of the religious as Aph has already pointed out there are other religions that do not observe Sunday as a day of rest and must therefore work on their rest day, alternatively the case is that they don't work on their religious rest day because it is also their work rest day, there is no reason why contracts can not allow those who wish to observe Sunday as a day of rest to do so, if this were a serious argument we would also not see the exeptions for small stores.
Valid points, however, what I am getting at is that this piece of legislation repeals the obligation by law to make companies have Sunday as a non-voluntary day. By not including a provision in this bill for that, this lets companies force workers to work on a Holy Day. You may say "oh even if it isn't in law that they have to do it, companies will be kind and allow for that anyway." But you can't just rely on companies to do that.
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ns_2
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(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
Valid points, however, what I am getting at is that this piece of legislation repeals the obligation by law to make companies have Sunday as a non-voluntary day. By not including a provision in this bill for that, this lets companies force workers to work on a Holy Day. You may say "oh even if it isn't in law that they have to do it, companies will be kind and allow for that anyway." But you can't just rely on companies to do that.
Sunday opt-outs remain in place.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by ns_2)
Sunday opt-outs remain in place.
What legislation covers that then?
(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
Valid points, however, what I am getting at is that this piece of legislation repeals the obligation by law to make companies have Sunday as a non-voluntary day. By not including a provision in this bill for that, this lets companies force workers to work on a Holy Day. You may say "oh even if it isn't in law that they have to do it, companies will be kind and allow for that anyway." But you can't just rely on companies to do that.
Tight labour markets mean employees get to be picky
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ns_2
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
What legislation covers that then?

Tight labour markets mean employees get to be picky
Employment Rights Act 1996, s.40

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1996/18/section/40
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CatusStarbright
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I support this bill and see no compelling reason why these restrictions should remain in place.
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mr T 999
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(Original post by Saunders16)
No, this is an unwise decision. This would extend the advantage inherent to large businesses and have a large cost towards smaller businesses. We ought to be encouraging people to trade, especially smaller businesses, with the high street struggling as it is.

I urge my fellow members to vote this down.
How does working extra day harm small businesses? This repeal could be argued allow businesses to compete with online businesses if they are open 7 days a week.

(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
Valid points, however, what I am getting at is that this piece of legislation repeals the obligation by law to make companies have Sunday as a non-voluntary day. By not including a provision in this bill for that, this lets companies force workers to work on a Holy Day. You may say "oh even if it isn't in law that they have to do it, companies will be kind and allow for that anyway." But you can't just rely on companies to do that.
As kindly linked by ns2 workers can opt out of working on Sunday.
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Saunders16
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(Original post by mr T 999)
How does working extra day harm small businesses? This repeal could be argued allow businesses to compete with online businesses if they are open 7 days a week.
It is already more difficult than ever for small businesses to compete with large businesses on the high street. By passing this, noting that currrent restrictions are purely on large shops, the added competition would cause a large portion of the profits earned by these stores to be cut.

Some will argue that they should fail and close (or earn less) if they cannot compete in a level playing field, but this argument holds no merit when business rates currently force even large businesses off the high street. Where I am from, McDonald's was forced to close because the larger store they used became unaffordable, not just because of business rates but because of rent. When more and more shops are struggling, this can be proven to be a terrible measure.

It can also be argued that online businesses simply do not compete in the same areas. If you cannot go to Sainsbury's or another supermarket on Sunday, you cannot go to an online business as your products will not magically appear at your doorstep. Instead, you will look at smaller shops if you are desperate for a specific item.

This is painted as pro-business but, with profit margins becoming smaller and smaller for high street stores, this is the most anti-business measure we could pass at this time of uncertainty.
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
There is no large economic benefit to relaxing Sunday trading laws, if anything, it can damage smaller businesses.

Nay.

Furthermore, making Sunday a mandatory working day this can infringe on the rights of religious people working who may be bound by contract to now work on this day.
This argument is often brought up for small shops that do a lot of business when the supermarkets are closed. It's completely silly - why should we make people's lives more hassle just for the sake of it?

Also, if you want people to have the day off then surely this goes against people going to work in small shops on Sundays?
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