Transferring from Dentistry to Medicine before 1st year starts Watch

ProfHealth
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Hello.

I'm wondering how probable it would be to transfer from dentistry to medicine before I go into the first year of dentistry should I have a change of heart after a lot of thinking. Any help would be very appreciated.
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Democracy
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
Hello.

I'm wondering how probable it would be to transfer from dentistry to medicine before I go into the first year of dentistry should I have a change of heart after a lot of thinking. Any help would be very appreciated.
Probably quite unlikely - I think they'd suggest taking a gap year and re-applying for medicine. Why do you want to transfer before you've even started?
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
Hello.

I'm wondering how probable it would be to transfer from dentistry to medicine before I go into the first year of dentistry should I have a change of heart after a lot of thinking. Any help would be very appreciated.
As @democracy said it is very unlikely. It is a different course by all accounts. Even within the same Uni (if your Uni does both dentistry and medicine) it's going to be hard, let alone those who don't do it.

You will most likely have to drop out, then reapply. Have you spoken to your Uni advisors?
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by Democracy)
Probably quite unlikely - I think they'd suggest taking a gap year and re-applying for medicine. Why do you want to transfer before you've even started?
Oh i don't want to transfer, I would just like to know if the options open. For me it's dentistry all the way, for countless reasons haha. Medicine appeals to me because it's broad and not focused on one part of the body, though I can't really get away from allure of performing surgery within an office.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
... I can't really get away from allure of performing surgery within an office.
Some GPs do simple surgeries. A lot of dermatology procedures are very much clinic-based.
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by ecolier)
Some GPs do simple surgeries. A lot of dermatology procedures are very much clinic-based.
I'm not so sure if these surgeries would be at the same level of complexity and responsibility that dentists and orthodontists do. And I'm not sure if they would perform such procedures as frequently as dental professionals.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
I'm not so sure if these surgeries would be at the same level of complexity and responsibility that dentists and orthodontists do. And I'm not sure if they would perform such procedures as frequently as dental professionals.
Neither am I, as I am not a GP or a dermatologist but just saying that there are office based surgeries in medicine too. That's the beauty of the medical degree I suppose - variety of specialties. There's bound to be one for any one.
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DrTSR
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
Oh i don't want to transfer, I would just like to know if the options open. For me it's dentistry all the way, for countless reasons haha. Medicine appeals to me because it's broad and not focused on one part of the body, though I can't really get away from allure of performing surgery within an office.
Hi,

I'm a qualified dentist.

You will be surprised to find that if you choose to study Dentistry, you will be studying about most of the human body in quite a significant amount of detail.

Medics and Dentists study pretty much the same things in the first couple years of university. However, Dentists then later 'specialise' in to studying the head and neck region.

So if your worry is that you will only study about the head and neck, then you are very wrong.
Last edited by DrTSR; 4 weeks ago
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by ecolier)
Neither am I, as I am not a GP or a dermatologist but just saying that there are office based surgeries in medicine too. That's the beauty of the medical degree I suppose - variety of specialties. There's bound to be one for any one.
We agree. That's the beauty of medicine to me; while dentistry is a very isolated specialism of medicine (though new research is bridging the gap between overall health and oral health) Medicine is broad and has so much more to offer, especially with its variety of specialties, some of which offer great balances between surgery and medicine. Tbh, I like how dentistry is both very medical and surgical. End of the day it's about personality, I would never have to be on call like doctors are (maybe one year but never again), I get to be very hands on and intensely focused now and then, and I get to chill in an office essentially being the leader of the whole unit. It's not a bad deal and is very suited to my personality.
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by DrTSR)
Hi,

I'm a qualified dentist.

You will be surprised to find that if you choose to study Dentistry, you will be studying about most of the human budy in quite a significant amount of detail.

Medics and Dentists study pretty much the same things in the first couple years of university. However, Dentists then later 'specialise' in to studying the head and neck region.

So if your worry is that you will only study about the head and neck, then you are very wrong.
Hi,

Thanks. I know that much. Am I right in thinking that the underlying reason for learning about whole body is because of how much scope we have in prescribing drugs, which means it's important for us to know how it might affect someone's overall health, I.e. potential for interaction with other drugs or degenerative body parts?
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DrTSR
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
We agree. That's the beauty of medicine to me; while dentistry is a very isolated specialism of medicine (though new research is bridging the gap between overall health and oral health) Medicine is broad and has so much more to offer, especially with its variety of specialties, some of which offer great balances between surgery and medicine. Tbh, I like how dentistry is both very medical and surgical. End of the day it's about personality, I would never have to be on call like doctors are (maybe one year but never again), I get to be very hands on and intensely focused now and then, and I get to chill in an office essentially being the leader of the whole unit. It's not a bad deal and is very suited to my personality.
You are very wrong in most of what you said

Dentistry has loads of specialities, this is a list of all recognised dental specialities in the UK:
Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dental Public Health, Endodontics, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Oral Medicine, Oral Microbiology, Oral Surgery, Orthodontics, Paediatric Dentistry, Periodontology, Prosthodontics, Restorative dentistry, Special Care Dentistry.

Yes Medicine has more areas you can specialise in to, but it is not to say dentistry is limiting, because it isn't.

Also, you mentioned doctors being on call. There are many dentists who are on call and it is very common for dentists, or any division of dentistry (a specialist in a field of Dentistry) to be on call if they choose that job post. Similarly, not all doctors are on call, unless they choose a specific job post that requires them to be on call.
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DrTSR
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
Hi,

Thanks. I know that much. Am I right in thinking that the underlying reason for learning about whole body is because of how much scope we have in prescribing drugs, which means it's important for us to know how it might affect someone's overall health, I.e. potential for interaction with other drugs or degenerative body parts?
This is a huge factor yes. Pharmacology is a major subject in Dentistry.

This is not the only reason though. Unfortunately, a lot of it is just for the sake of learning (as with most degrees, most of what you learn you wont even need). This is the case with Medicine too.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
...I would never have to be on call like doctors are....
I noted that @DrTSR has already mentioned this, but a lot of doctors don't actually do on-calls.

The ones who do tends to be more in the front-line, hence they get noticed (and why people think all / most doctors do on-calls!).
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by DrTSR)
You are very wrong in most of what you said

Dentistry has loads of specialities, this is a list of all recognised dental specialities in the UK:
Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dental Public Health, Endodontics, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Oral Medicine, Oral Microbiology, Oral Surgery, Orthodontics, Paediatric Dentistry, Periodontology, Prosthodontics, Restorative dentistry, Special Care Dentistry.

Yes Medicine has more areas you can specialise in to, but it is not to say dentistry is limiting, because it isn't.

Also, you mentioned doctors being on call. There are many dentists who are on call and it is very common for dentists, or any division of dentistry (a specialist in a field of Dentistry) to be on call if they choose that job post. Similarly, not all doctors are on call, unless they choose a specific job post that requires them to be on call.
I'm not disagreeing with you at all. I'm just mentioning how medicine isn't limited to one area of the body, and you're very right - dentistry isn't limiting at all, but I'm speaking relatively; in comparison, medicine is massive. For example, medicine has psychiatry, which is an aspect of medicine that isn't even seen in dentistry.

Also, it's interesting to learn that not all doctors are on call. I imagine the majority of physician specialties require that doctors be on call. Personally if I were to do medicine, i would definitely like to do something more hands on, perhaps even neurosurgery since neuroscience is very interesting to me, if it's not neurosurgery then I would probably be a GP, but the prospect of being a GP doesn't appeal to me at all unless I'm dental one, whereby I would be performing complicated hands on surgery. At the end of the day, it's a matter of personality.
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by DrTSR)
This is a huge factor yes. Pharmacology is a major subject in Dentistry.

This is not the only reason though. Unfortunately, a lot of it is just for the sake of learning (as with most degrees, most of what you learn you wont even need). This is the case with Medicine too.
Slightly makes sense to me. Teaching you more than what's required in today's practise gives you a stronger academic foundation to grow with the advances of tomorrow, and a clever pod might use all that extra, seemingly unnecessary info in their research or whatever to advance dentistry (or medicine or engineering) in some brilliant way. That's always been my thinking at least.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
...i would definitely like to do something more hands on..
There are a lot of medical (physician)specialties that you wouldn't think is hands-on, but actually is very much so.
Cardiology -> pacemaker insertion, angiograms, percutaneous coronary intervention, transcutaneous aortic valve implantation...
Respiratory -> bronchoscopies (+ endo-ultrasound etc.)...
Gastroenterology -> endoscopies (+ ERCP / PEG insertion), colonoscopies (+ sigmoidoscopies)...
Haematology -> bone marrow biopsy...
Renal -> kidney biopsy
Rheumatology -> joint injections / aspirations
Dermatology -> as I said, plenty!
and of course you have niche specialties like Sports and Exercise Medicine
See: https://www.st3recruitment.org.uk/specialties/overview

The following are non-medical (i.e. non-physician), non-surgical specialties:
Radiology -> countless procedures, virtually all involving X-rays and catheters
Anaesthetics -> you can't not be hands-on!

To explore more about different medical specialties, go to https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/Exp.../Roles-Doctors
Last edited by ecolier; 4 weeks ago
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Democracy
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
Also, it's interesting to learn that not all doctors are on call. I imagine the majority of physician specialties require that doctors be on call. Personally if I were to do medicine, i would definitely like to do something more hands on, perhaps even neurosurgery since neuroscience is very interesting to me, if it's not neurosurgery then I would probably be a GP, but the prospect of being a GP doesn't appeal to me at all unless I'm dental one, whereby I would be performing complicated hands on surgery. At the end of the day, it's a matter of personality.
1st choice neurosurgery, 2nd choice...GP. Interesting preferences.
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by Democracy)
1st choice neurosurgery, 2nd choice...GP. Interesting preferences.
I'm naturally inclined to the idea of being a GP because it's broad, in an office, very chill in comparison to other specialties, other than Dermatology or Radioliogy, but I'm not much interested in those. And neurosurgery largely because I love neuroscience, find it fascinating.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ProfHealth)
...it's broad, in an office, very chill in comparison to other specialties... And ...I love neuroscience, find it fascinating.
Ahem.... neurology anyone?!
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ProfHealth
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(Original post by ecolier)
Ahem.... neurology anyone?!
Considered it, but I don't think I would choose neurology over neurosurgery. I would prefer something more hands on if I'm treating neurological disorders. But if I'm not in neurology, then I'm gonna want the more relaxed life of a GP over anything else, which is why being a GDP is very suited for me. Basically a GP who performs very complicated surgery frequently.
Last edited by ProfHealth; 4 weeks ago
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