Medicine Course VS 3 A levels : Work load. Watch

lewis.h
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What’s the work load of a medicine course at university like compared to the work load of 3 A levels in Maths, Biology, and Chemistry ?

Thanks guys for your time. I know how hard it is being a student at your level.

Lewis.
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nexttime
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I think the biggest factor in this is how willing you are to go from getting all top grades best in class to being entirely average and scraping a pass. If you can't hack that and want to gun for being top of the med school you're going to have way more pressure on you than someone who is ok cruising through.

But overall: A bit harder, I would say. How much people work for their A-levels is very individual but that variation will continue into med school so yeah, for most people: a bit harder. I would suggest those that didn't have to work much for A-levels will find the transition tougher, but they will still, most likely, continue to work less than their peers.

Many students initially face the additional challenge of having to look after themselves for the first time in their lives, so there's that too.

Of course some med students also work part-time jobs. Some also do high-level sports requiring 15+ hours of weekly training. Its very much not all work.
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lewis.h
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Thank you !!

(Original post by nexttime)
I think the biggest factor in this is how willing you are to go from getting all top grades best in class to being entirely average and scraping a pass. If you can't hack that and want to gun for being top of the med school you're going to have way more pressure on you than someone who is ok cruising through.

But overall: A bit harder, I would say. How much people work for their A-levels is very individual but that variation will continue into med school so yeah, for most people: a bit harder. I would suggest those that didn't have to work much for A-levels will find the transition tougher, but they will still, most likely, continue to work less than their peers.

Many students initially face the additional challenge of having to look after themselves for the first time in their lives, so there's that too.

Of course some med students also work part-time jobs. Some also do high-level sports requiring 15+ hours of weekly training. Its very much not all work.
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p_s79
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(Original post by nexttime)
I think the biggest factor in this is how willing you are to go from getting all top grades best in class to being entirely average and scraping a pass. If you can't hack that and want to gun for being top of the med school you're going to have way more pressure on you than someone who is ok cruising through.

But overall: A bit harder, I would say. How much people work for their A-levels is very individual but that variation will continue into med school so yeah, for most people: a bit harder. I would suggest those that didn't have to work much for A-levels will find the transition tougher, but they will still, most likely, continue to work less than their peers.

Many students initially face the additional challenge of having to look after themselves for the first time in their lives, so there's that too.

Of course some med students also work part-time jobs. Some also do high-level sports requiring 15+ hours of weekly training. Its very much not all work.
would you have to work for many hours everyday after 5 fstraight from first year? also is it very factual recall style or more application style exams? Thanks! x
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ecolier
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(Original post by lewis.h)
What’s the work load of a medicine course at university like compared to the work load of 3 A levels in Maths, Biology, and Chemistry ?

Thanks guys for your time. I know how hard it is being a student at your level.

Lewis.
@nexttime has already covered most / all the points.

My answer is that it depends on the year of study. By the end of fourth year and then fifth year you'd be on the wards a lot. It's also different because a lot of medicine is "soft" skills rather than hard - so you will need to hone your communication skills and practical skills. It's not just learn these concepts, memorise those equations etc.

Further to other questions:

(Original post by p_s79)
would you have to work for many hours everyday after 5 fstraight from first year? also is it very factual recall style or more application style exams? Thanks! x
(1) It depends on the medical school. PBL med schools will have a different teaching style compared to med schools using other types of teaching.
(2) It depends on your year - many med schools have different exams at 1st year compared to 4th year.

My experience

Where I studied, first and second year was lecture-based and broken down into modules and we had separate modular exams. By the end of the two and a half years we had an integrated written and practical exam testing everything.

Then there is the clinical blocks. I had exams at the end of fourth year and end of fifth year. The fourth year one is to test the knowledge gained in all the fourth year blocks, while the end of fifth year exam is of course the Finals!

Not trying to boast but I settled in quite well into med school, getting a few excellents, merits and distinctions. But as @nexttime rightly said a lot of people had a had time adjusting to being (relatively) average.
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nexttime
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(Original post by p_s79)
would you have to work for many hours everyday after 5 fstraight from first year? also is it very factual recall style or more application style exams? Thanks! x
As in, would you have scheduled teaching after 5? That would be quite unusual at most places, I assume. I had to do lots - 7am on a Sunday was probably the worst - but that's just because tutorials were quite informally organised and we had to fit in around professor's schedules!

Will you need to do private study and might that be after 5? Yes of course.
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Mr Optimist
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(Original post by ecolier)


Not trying to boast but I settled in quite well into med school, getting a few excellents, merits and distinctions. But as @nexttime rightly said a lot of people had a had time adjusting to being (relatively) average.
Which topics did you find most difficult in med school? e.g renal, embryology etc.
Also, what subjects did you recieve your excellents in? Could you comment how did you managed to achieve the excellent grades? Where those only in subjects you enjoyed more?

Thanks in advanced.
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Mr Optimist
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(Original post by nexttime)
I think the biggest factor in this is how willing you are to go from getting all top grades best in class to being entirely average and scraping a pass. If you can't hack that and want to gun for being top of the med school you're going to have way more pressure on you than someone who is ok cruising through.

But overall: A bit harder, I would say. How much people work for their A-levels is very individual but that variation will continue into med school so yeah, for most people: a bit harder. I would suggest those that didn't have to work much for A-levels will find the transition tougher, but they will still, most likely, continue to work less than their peers.

Many students initially face the additional challenge of having to look after themselves for the first time in their lives, so there's that too.

Of course some med students also work part-time jobs. Some also do high-level sports requiring 15+ hours of weekly training. Its very much not all work.
How does the grading system work in medicine? For example is it split into pass, merit, distinction?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Mr Optimist)
Which topics did you find most difficult in med school? e.g renal, embryology etc.
Oh I didn't like embryology but it's a huge topic and all modules include a bit of embryology in it.

Also, what subjects did you recieve your excellents in?
:laugh: It was so long ago that I have forgotten. Histology was one, anatomy was another. Not in neurological system though, ironically.

Could you comment how did you managed to achieve the excellent grades? Where those only in subjects you enjoyed more?
No, I just worked harder and I really liked the theoretical learning. Throughout med school it's the practical exams that I do (slightly) worse in, compared to the written exams.

Thanks in advanced.
No problem!
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Angury
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(Original post by lewis.h)
What’s the work load of a medicine course at university like compared to the work load of 3 A levels in Maths, Biology, and Chemistry ?

Thanks guys for your time. I know how hard it is being a student at your level.

Lewis.
I imagine it's different for different people.

Personally, I hated the first two years of Medicine. I found it dull and couldn't motivate myself to study. It was just lectures 9-5 about topics I didn't care about.

After that, Medicine became a lot easier (for me). I really enjoyed the clinical aspect of it, I felt like I had responsibility and I didn't feel like I was just 'studying.'

In the first two years of Medicine I would say the workload is more (not necessarily harder) than at A Levels.
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lewis.h
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(Original post by Angury)
I imagine it's different for different people.

Personally, I hated the first two years of Medicine. I found it dull and couldn't motivate myself to study. It was just lectures 9-5 about topics I didn't care about.

After that, Medicine became a lot easier (for me). I really enjoyed the clinical aspect of it, I felt like I had responsibility and I didn't feel like I was just 'studying.'

In the first two years of Medicine I would say the workload is more (not necessarily harder) than at A Levels.
Thank you !
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leahnj
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(Original post by Angury)
I imagine it's different for different people.

Personally, I hated the first two years of Medicine. I found it dull and couldn't motivate myself to study. It was just lectures 9-5 about topics I didn't care about.

After that, Medicine became a lot easier (for me). I really enjoyed the clinical aspect of it, I felt like I had responsibility and I didn't feel like I was just 'studying.'

In the first two years of Medicine I would say the workload is more (not necessarily harder) than at A Levels.
which kind of course were you on/ uni?
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Angury
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(Original post by leahnj)
which kind of course were you on/ uni?
Cardiff. They have since changed to Case-Based Learning so it is very different now, and what I've written is pretty much out of date.
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