Computer Science Help?!?! Watch

ALevelCompSci
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Despite my username, I'm not an expert on all things Computer Science (who'd have guessed he he he...). I am currently in Year 12 and taking Computer Science but I'm not really sure on how to revise (for GCSEs I memorised the CGP textbook and got a 9 but I don't think I should do that at A-Level).

Anyone have any tips on how to revise for Computer Science A-Level?
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by ALevelCompSci)
Despite my username, I'm not an expert on all things Computer Science (who'd have guessed he he he...). I am currently in Year 12 and taking Computer Science but I'm not really sure on how to revise (for GCSEs I memorised the CGP textbook and got a 9 but I don't think I should do that at A-Level).

Anyone have any tips on how to revise for Computer Science A-Level?
Do the same thing at A-level, the course is pretty much the same just with a tiiiiiny bit more detail.

Anyone who says "Memorising the textbook won't help you at A-level" is lying, just memorize it and then do past papers.
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ALevelCompSci
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
Do the same thing at A-level, the course is pretty much the same just with a tiiiiiny bit more detail.

Anyone who says "Memorising the textbook won't help you at A-level" is lying, just memorize it and then do past papers.
Thanks for the advice! The thing is for GCSE's I memorised the CGP revision guide, but I don't have any revision guides for the A-Level. I have the A-Level course book (which is around over 250 pages long). Do you suggest I should memorise the course book? If so, how?

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winterscoming
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There's always going to be some stuff which you could memorise (e.g. Legal/Ethical issues, network protocols, etc.), but I wouldn't advise trying to memorise topics like programming or algorithms because those are more about your computational thinking and problem solving skills, and learning to understand the programming language so it's a lot more skills-based.

The only way to really be competent in those skills is to keep on practicing and actually spend plenty of time solving problems in code -- it's a bit like working out; the more you do it, the better trained you'll be at it. But just as with real exercise, it gets harder if you don't do it very often.

There's loads of practice problems to try here: https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/260930...es-booklet.pdf
(It doesn't matter if you're on a different exam board, the coding challenges would be good for anyone trying to practice/improve their programming and problem solving skills)
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