Should mobility scooter riders have to pass a test? Watch

Ambitious1999
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It amazes me the amount of these mobility scooters on the pavements these days. There is no test or licence required, yet they think they own the pavements.
I think to use one there should be a licence required and a pass a test.

I do understand a lot of the genuine users are disabled so maybe the training could be provided, free by voluntary groups?
It would certainly make it a lot safer for both the users and pedestrians who have to share the pavement with them.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by Ambitious1999)
It amazes me the amount of these mobility scooters on the pavements these days. There is no test or licence required, yet they think they own the pavements.
I think to use one there should be a licence required and a pass a test.

I do understand a lot of the genuine users are disabled so maybe the training could be provided, free by voluntary groups?
It would certainly make it a lot safer for both the users and pedestrians who have to share the pavement with them.
I'd rather old folks ride a mobility scooter than drive a car for which there is no mandatory retest.
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Emma:-)
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Most of the people who ride these are old or disabled (or both). Most of the people who ride them are fine but there are always the odd few who ride them stupidly or dont use common sense.
There shouldnt be a test-but those caught driving them really stupidly (ive seen them driving in the middle of the road and all sorts) should be given some sort of penalty (e.g.a £30 ticket or something).
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sknudson
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I've actually never seen a mobility scooter on the road. The hazard perception component on my LDC DVD made it seem like they'd be around every corner.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by IWMTom)
I'd rather old folks ride a mobility scooter than drive a car for which there is no mandatory retest.
Although the odd few drive the scooters like idiots, I do agree, id rather them drive one of those than a car.
I dont want to sound horrible but there are some old drivers who should not be on the road. I got criticised for saying this on here once but there should be some sort of test for those over a certain age.
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Guru Jason
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I'd rather ban all bicycles from riding on the pavements. Here's an idea, get a ****ing helmet and a hi vis and ride on the ****ing road.
Last edited by Guru Jason; 4 weeks ago
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by sknudson)
I've actually never seen a mobility scooter on the road. The hazard perception component on my LDC DVD made it seem like they'd be around every corner.
It doesnt happen often but ive seen it happen.
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StriderHort
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I thought that was the whole point of mobility scooters? an exceptional measure to give people a mode of transport who otherwise wouldn't have one, at least party because they would not be able to meet the requirements of a driving licence.

For all I see them pottering about the place i've never had/seen an incident personally (although there's always a few old 'OAP joins motorway wrong way on scooter' stories kicking about for good measure. I've got more risk of being annoyed or injured by similar sized prams and pallet trucks and such, and no one ever asks them to be licensed.
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Claire461
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I had to go to Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Aylesbury last week for some tests. I popped into town first. I counted NINE scooters within a 5 minute walk. None of them were elderly. They were around mid30s to 50s.
Aylesbury is the scooter capital of the South East. If you walk past McDonalds, there will be at least 3 or 4 scooters parked outside.
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TheMcSame
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I wouldn't go as far as licencing, but I don't think it'd hurt to give them a few hours of training to make sure they've got things down. The biggest problem with mobility scooters is tight paths. Sometimes there just isn't room for a mobility scooter and an oncoming person. God forbid two mobility scooters meet each other on a tight path.

Personally, I can't say I've had many bad experiences with mobility scooter riders. Those that have been bad are all related to their use of the road while I'm driving. Even then, we're talking very minor things.

Realistically though, slow electric vehicles that are designed to be used by the masses aren't usually all that complicated. I've driven a mobi scoot and I've driven something called a PPT. The two aren't massively different though the PPTs I've driven are ones you stand up on, whereas you sit on a mobi scooter. The PPT is a tad more complicated because you've got fork controls, rear wheel steering, tighter turning circle, usually faster and puts out a lot more torque (probably on par with a small diesel, if not slightly more). Not to mention the wheels are slick, so it's always fun when you're driving on a wet floor. But when I say a tad, I only mean a tad. There's nothing to it. These are vehicles designed to be driven by anyone, even the dumbest of the dumbest should be able to pick it up with relative ease. As long as you've got a brain, 5 minutes of messing around should be enough to get the basics down.

I'd rather take my chances against a granny on her new mobility scooter than a granny driving down a country lane in the dark...
(Original post by Guru Jason)
I'd rather ban all bicycles from riding on the pavements. Here's an idea, get a ****ing helmet and a hi vis and ride on the ****ing road.
Fun fact: With the exception of shared use paths, bicycles are banned from riding on footways. They have been for over 100 years.

Section 72 of the Highways Act 1835 made it a criminal offence to lead or drive a carriage of any description on footways and this law still remains in force to this day.
In 1879 there was a Judgement (Taylor v Goodwin) that set the precedent that in law, bicycles are considered carriages within the meaning of the Highway Acts. This was later officially put into law under Section 85(1) of the Local Government Act 1888.

Interestingly though, a mobility scooter likely falls under the definition of a carriage so they may well, technically, be banned from using footways anyway. Though saying that, they may be immune to said law because they're mobility aids.

StriderHort
Actually, as far as pallet trucks go, the Government does legally require companies to train employees on such equipment. Most companies do training in-house so you don't actually get a licence as such, but training done by out-of-house providers provides you with a transferable licence.

And yes, you can actually be licenced for a regular pallet truck. I believe the classification is Z1, at least for Mentor's courses. I doubt anyone opts for that though since it's so easy to teach people how to use a pallet truck in-house. Strictly speaking, I'm 'licenced' for Z1 through in-house training and I hold an A2 licence (ride-on pallet trucks and LLOPs) issues by an out-of-house provider.

Strictly speaking, you do actually need to be licenced, but the training can be provided in-house which doesn't grant you an actual licence if you get what I mean.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 3 weeks ago
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