Avoiding the Welsh Baccalaureate Watch

学生の父
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It's A-level choices time. At most school Sixth Forms in Wales, students are required to take the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Qualification alongside their A-levels.

The Welsh Bac is equivalent in size and value to an A-level, but is a separate Level 3 qualification. Many find it a valuable thing as they enter the world of work and higher education, but others consider it to be a waste of time.

Now here's the thing: a lot of pressure is being put on our child to take the Welsh Bac alongside 4 STEM A-levels. We strongly believe this will compromise their chance of the best possible A-level outcomes.

In a school Sixth Form which has compulsory Welsh Bac, do any of you have experience of somehow avoiding taking the qualification, or did you just have to take it in the end?

Were there any cunning steps you had to take to get out of it, or did you simply have to ask nicely?
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999tigger
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(Original post by 学生の父)
It's A-level choices time. At most school Sixth Forms in Wales, students are required to take the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Qualification alongside their A-levels.

The Welsh Bac is equivalent in size and value to an A-level, but is a separate Level 3 qualification. Many find it a valuable thing as they enter the world of work and higher education, but others consider it to be a waste of time.

Now here's the thing: a lot of pressure is being put on our child to take the Welsh Bac alongside 4 STEM A-levels. We strongly believe this will compromise their chance of the best possible A-level outcomes.

In a school Sixth Form which has compulsory Welsh Bac, do any of you have experience of somehow avoiding taking the qualification, or did you just have to take it in the end?

Were there any cunning steps you had to take to get out of it, or did you simply have to ask nicely?
I appreciate your position, but the questions I have answered on welsh bacc have been more positive for doing the qualification and it has saved them plus allowed them to drop an A level.

You need to check the school rules and see whether its compulsory[ I see it is] . In many schools it is. If so you will have to appeal to the school or find a new one where they can just choose 4 A levels. Personally I would do 3, unless theres good reason. Bu joining sixth form you are agreeing to agree with their method of education. It might be worth looking at what stage you can drop it or to show with the particular course you want then it is not needed. No harm in asking.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I appreciate your position, but the questions I have answered on welsh bacc have been more positive for doing the qualification and it has saved them plus allowed them to drop an A level.

You need to check the school rules and see whether its compulsory[ I see it is] . In many schools it is. If so you will have to appeal to the school or find a new one where they can just choose 4 A levels. Personally I would do 3, unless theres good reason. Bu joining sixth form you are agreeing to agree with their method of education. It might be worth looking at what stage you can drop it or to show with the particular course you want then it is not needed. No harm in asking.
The problem is the Welsh Bac is compulsory in most schools or colleges. It is a total waste of time and something devised by WAG politicians which schools use to increase their average UCAS points. Many English universities do not accept it as part of offers for STEM courses and some dont accept it at all. I agree 3 A levels is better than 4 but this is an unnecessary waste of time and pressure on top of A levels. Welsh Bac would be fine if it was part of a 3 A level offer in Welsh Universities but putting extra pressure on top of A levels puts Welsh students at a disadvantage when compared to the English.
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mpaprika
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I'm sorry but two weeks of pure welsh bacc is a nightmare and a waste of time :argh:
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fio.rella.
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I was required to take welsh bacc by my sixth form and having completed it, I can say it was a complete waste of time for me. I applied to two welsh universities who did take my welsh bacc grade into account, but these weren’t my top choice. The other universities I applied to were English universities and they didn’t really acknowledge welsh bacc to be equivalent to an A level, it also wasn’t included in any of my offers. I much would have preferred to have done another A level in a facilitating subject instead of welsh bacc considering that it took the same amount of time. At my school we had as many welsh bacc lessons as another A level subject, so yes for me it was a huge waste of time.
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999tigger
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
The problem is the Welsh Bac is compulsory in most schools or colleges. It is a total waste of time and something devised by WAG politicians which schools use to increase their average UCAS points. Many English universities do not accept it as part of offers for STEM courses and some dont accept it at all. I agree 3 A levels is better than 4 but this is an unnecessary waste of time and pressure on top of A levels. Welsh Bac would be fine if it was part of a 3 A level offer in Welsh Universities but putting extra pressure on top of A levels puts Welsh students at a disadvantage when compared to the English.
As i say ive seen situations where its been a lifesaver. If you dont wish your child to do it, then withdraw and teach your own child/ do them online or go to college.

Anyway I will leave you to it.
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学生の父
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Thanks for your answers. The issue here seems to be one of comparability with candidates from England in applications to high tariff STEM courses in RG universities.

I have checked the entry requirements for STEM courses in many of these unis, and although they seem to pay lip service to the WBQ in a general sense, it doesn't get included in the offers. In fact it just seems to be a complete waste of time for a student wishing to take A-levels in say Maths, FM, Physics and Chemistry. If they know they're likely to get high grades, why make them trifle with a politically driven exercise in social levelling?

If the WBQ is so good, why do none of the independent schools in Wales even offer it as an option for their students? Why do students who go to Sixth Form colleges and FE not get compelled to do it? It only seems to be compulsory in school Sixth Forms, and even then many schools will make provision for those who would not benefit from a Welsh Bac.

That's not the case here, though, and the FE college is 90 minutes away on the college bus. Unless the school is willing to yield, DC will take the Welsh Bac half heartedly through gritted teeth.
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pikachufrostawar
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IM NOT DONE WITH THE ZOHAN







fucc off ya big lout
no but srsly there is a problem with the welsh BACCC
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学生の父
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(Original post by 999tigger)
As i say ive seen situations where its been a lifesaver. If you dont wish your child to do it, then withdraw and teach your own child/ do them online or go to college.

Anyway I will leave you to it.
I agree 100% with you. Yes, some students do find it a life saver; I probably have a child myself in that category. My issue is the one size fits all compulsion implicit in it.

I thought our so-called comprehensive schools were meant to provide fully for all across the spectrum of ability and aptitude. MAT children do not get adequate provision in many schools as it is. Surely, taking away the chance to study 4 A-levels (still open to their English peers) is a sad indictment of the singular lack of ambition in the Welsh school system? The WBQ is a crude tool which seeks to up the Level 3/Key Stage 5 outcomes in our schools, as well as bundling hidden curriculum content into a tangible qualification.

Teaching STEM subjects (or any subjects, for that matter) at A-level is not something most parents would be able to do, and as I stated in my earlier reply, the FE college is a 90 minute bus ride away.

You're suggesting this is Hobson's choice; like it or lump it; take it or leave it. Thanks a lot for your enlightened, broad-based pedagogy.
Last edited by 学生の父; 4 weeks ago
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