Funguy
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So just want ot know how hard is it to do law a university? Ive only just thought about doing it but want to know will i be able to cope. I generally know it requires a lot of reading and essay writing. How much reading does it actually require and how is the workload?
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Ishtar
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(Original post by Funguy)
So just want ot know how hard is it to do law a university? Ive only just thought about doing it but want to know will i be able to cope. I generally know it requires a lot of reading and essay writing. How much reading does it actually require and how is the workload?
Depends very much on where you do your law degree. And how seriously you take it. And lots of other variables.
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Onearmedbandit
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I really don't want to tempt fate by answering this now as I've my last 2 exams on Tuesday and Wednesday, but what the hell. I've found it a lot easier than I initially thought. You'll find there are definite shortcuts to the reading, which you learn over time. It isn't that bad. I've had time to play football for uni, as well as be on the committee of two societies, and have a great social life


But like I said.. don't wanna tempt fate :p: But so long as I do ok in these next two exams I should be getting a 2.1 and entry onto the masters degree
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iodine
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Yes at first it was unbearable but that was because I read all 25ish odd pages of the judgment of Nettleship v. Weston and basically tried to read everything

As the above poster said you learn how to cope, thats not to say its easy though. At times it can be hell...usually around exam and coursework deadlines.
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alicetjh
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hehe
great
i wanna know too
now i got it
thanks guys
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2026
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Challenging, but also fascinating.

Worth the hardship, I think.
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Prudy
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HOw long is your piece of string. It will be a challenge for anyone I'd say, but how much of a challenge depends on how keen to put effort in you are.
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airplane
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i am afraid of reading law too, simply because i know for sure that i do not have a fantastic range of vocabulary, i take some time to get used to public speaking and it takes me abit of time to get started and write freely.... that said, i am entering warwick for law this year, i really want to do law cos its the only thing i have a passion/interest for and i am definitely willing to put in the effort. that said, i am afraid it will not be enough.
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Dom1989
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(Original post by Prudy)
HOw long is your piece of string. It will be a challenge for anyone I'd say, but how much of a challenge depends on how keen to put effort in you are.
You sound like Yoda!

Someone else above mentioned Nettleship v Weston, I did that case n A-level and you don't need to read 25 pages?! It just says a learner driver is judged by the standards of an ordinary driver no?
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curiouslyorange1989
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haha i know what you mean about the vocab, i consider myself reasonably well read (dipped into a few classics for the ol' CV if you know what i mean ) however i recently started reading the times law supplement and i swear they think of a word and then go onto an online thesaurus to get its most obscure and archaic synonym before putting it into a sentence.

but back on topic, im glad that its possible to have a social life AND get a good degree in law, i had people telling me horror stories of 50+ hours a week locked in your room just to get a 2:1...
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Lewisy-boy
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The vocab thing is only a problem very briefly, because you can just look every word up on the internet or in a dictionary if you don't trust the internet! Also in essays etc I've been told (and it seems to be true) that using unnecessarily long winded ways of expressing things loses you marks and most of my best results have come when I've used really short and, to be fair, semi-remedial sentences in my exams!

At the end of the day a law degree is tough, but it culd be harder and the relative 'hardness' of it is definitely dependant on a number of subjective factors.
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Miss Mess
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Hey
As a law degree survivor I thought Id post. Law isnt difficult... there are no foxing concepts to grasp really, its all fairly straight forward. What it is, however, is an awful lot of hard work. Yeah, vocab was a problem for me (esp when you look up a word in the dictionary and dont even understand the word used in its definition!) but more than that it was the amount of reading to get through (you learn tricks in the end) and the sheer memorisation.. its not enough to grasp a concept. You need references, references, references!
Your professors will give you chat about "for every 1 hr in class, you need to spend 4 hours reading" this will increase to 8 hrs at the end of your degree. Its a bunch of crap. Yeah, when I was at uni there were a bunch of people who did it... but they were usually the ones that needed to. If youre a reasonably clever kid youll do fine. Social life does suffer a little... not because of the work but just because of the people who are more likely to do law. I think my friends really were a good influence on me - they were in the library all weekend, every weekend. I wasnt, but i felt guilty if i didnt make a token trip once in a while in my last two yrs (I did the 4 yr LLB in Edinburgh)! 1st and 2nd yr were definitely much more relaxed and I did basically no work, scraping through by the skin of my teeth.
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Redefined
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You keep reading until your confident that you know all you think you need to know about the topic. So in saying that, you can't define how much one would need to read.

What I can say however, is that one book on one topic is not enough. Several books (not cover to cover though), numerous articles, a hefty amount of cases, then there is the statutes and for good measure you can throw in a few articles.
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Onearmedbandit
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(Original post by Dom1989)
You sound like Yoda!

Someone else above mentioned Nettleship v Weston, I did that case n A-level and you don't need to read 25 pages?! It just says a learner driver is judged by the standards of an ordinary driver no?
A good example of cutting down on the reading for a law degree is by getting the important parts of a case without actually reading the judgment. Important information (imo) is:
-The facts of the case
-The reasoning behind the court's decision (ratio)
-The decision itself


Now, reading the judgment will always give you the most knowledge of a case. Reading a text book, especially a small one, will often not give you very full picture, as demonstrated above.

I don't remember this case particularly well (did tort last year :p:) but I believe the ratio was actually that any qualified professional is judged by the same standard, regardless of experience, not just drivers. This is a good example of how simply reading a text book might give you slightly skewed information.


My advice for cases in a law degree would be either:
1. Get a case book on the subject, which contains extracts of judgments, commentary and analysis on all the important cases

2. Get a detailed text book rather than a skimpy one, as bigger text books tend to have more case analysis and so should give you a better insight into the cases.

3. Read case headnotes - these are summaries at the start of important judgments on case websites like westlaw and lexis nexis which essentially sum up the case.


Of course, if there's a case you really don't understrand, or it is just extremely important (like Donoghue v Stephenson which created negligence) then it is probably worth reading the judgment.

Hope that helped
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Onearmedbandit
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that's right :p: thanks!
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Prudy
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(Original post by Dom1989)
You sound like Yoda!

Someone else above mentioned Nettleship v Weston, I did that case n A-level and you don't need to read 25 pages?! It just says a learner driver is judged by the standards of an ordinary driver no?
Well thank you very much .

Yes. Basically. The case isn't really that important in the grand scheme of things. Bolam is actually more important.

(Also, out of interest, this entire area of negligence - adjusted objective standard - is all rubbish imo.)
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Prudy
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(Original post by Onearmedbandit)
A good example of cutting down on the reading for a law degree is by getting the important parts of a case without actually reading the judgment. Important information (imo) is:
-The facts of the case
-The reasoning behind the court's decision (ratio)
-The decision itself


Now, reading the judgment will always give you the most knowledge of a case. Reading a text book, especially a small one, will often not give you very full picture, as demonstrated above.

I don't remember this case particularly well (did tort last year :p:) but I believe the ratio was actually that any qualified professional is judged by the same standard, regardless of experience, not just drivers. This is a good example of how simply reading a text book might give you slightly skewed information.


My advice for cases in a law degree would be either:
1. Get a case book on the subject, which contains extracts of judgments, commentary and analysis on all the important cases

2. Get a detailed text book rather than a skimpy one, as bigger text books tend to have more case analysis and so should give you a better insight into the cases.

3. Read case headnotes - these are summaries at the start of important judgments on case websites like westlaw and lexis nexis which essentially sum up the case.


Of course, if there's a case you really don't understrand, or it is just extremely important (like Donoghue v Stephenson which created negligence) then it is probably worth reading the judgment.

Hope that helped

Although one should take caution with this of course.

As a general point, I think it is also worth reading dissenting judgments/opinions whenever they come up. They tend to have a habit of becoming law later on in life.
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Onearmedbandit
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I suppose.. to be on the safe side... you shouldn't treat headnotes as biblical text. However, other than occasionally being confusing, I've found headnotes to be a fairly decent source of info.
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Lewisy-boy
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I'm of the opinion that for about 99% of questions headnote detail will suffice at undergraduate level - I rarely read full cases, and I've done pretty well thus far.
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airplane
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thanks A LOT for the replies, it did help me feel a little more confident. i actually do enjoy reading, so hopefully that is a good start. just wondering, how much public speaking/debating do we have to do, or is it more of essay writing? i hope the skill of writing insanely long essays is something that can be developed over time since it will definitely take me some time to be able to write freely and express myself adequately. i will really appreciate it if someone can give me a general outline of what to expect during the course, so i can be mentally prepared

p.s my apologies to funguy for riding on your post.
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