A levels for law Watch

dobby_hpotter
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Hey everyone I’m currently in year 11 and I’m really interested in studying law. I’m thinking of doing Maths, Chemistry, History and Psychology for alevel. Do you think these subjects would allow me to get into a competitive uni if I get the grades?

My schools offers both Alevels and the IB. Do you think the IB would be a better option?
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Lady Jamie
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They are great choices and grades always > subject. I would personally recommend 3 A levels but feel free to do 4 if you are confident that you can manage.

Don't know too much about IB so hopefully someone else can advise u on that, I personally don't see why it would be a 'better' option tho.
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Shree515
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A Law degree doesn't have specific subject requirements but it's good to have a humanities subject (History) and one more facilitating subject (Maths and/or Chemistry). Psychology is definitely related to the study of Law. It's up to you whether you want to do 3 or 4 subjects; which choice will get you 3 A*s and/or As and which would get you two good grades but one/two ok grades?

IB is a study route for those who either don't really know what uni or career path they want to follow or maybe they do know those things but want to be educated in the various types of educational categories; maths, english, science, a language and arts and humanities.

A Levels are for those who want to expertise in either specific sets of complementing subjects or various types of subjects. A Levels is more books based whereas IB is more well rounded and theoretical; CAS, EE, TOK etc will certainly challenge your dedication, time management, pressure management, various capabilities and more.

Both A Levels and IB are equally respectable; despite one having the reputation of being a qualification undertaken by only the 'smartest'. In the end, the amount of work and dedication you put into your studies will be shown in your results, no matter if you took A Levels or IB.
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anonymous1231231
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(Original post by Shree515)
A Law degree doesn't have specific subject requirements but it's good to have a humanities subject (History) and one more facilitating subject (Maths and/or Chemistry). Psychology is definitely related to the study of Law.
Dunno if I’m tired or if this is just pure trash
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Shree515
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(Original post by anonymous1231231)
Dunno if I’m tired or if this is just pure trash
Please kindly inform me how this is trash.
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Simbasoul
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Traditional Universities offering Law would probably prefer A levels - I would caution doing 4 if the overall effect of this would be lower grades in 4 - 3 good grades is what you will actually need. There are no specific A levles required for Law but History is very well respected and Maths/Chemistry are good strong academic facilitating subjects. Whilst Psychology is an interesting subject and has lots of applications for Law, it is none facilitating (you don't even need Psychology A level to move onto a Psychology Degree!) so only take the 4th if you feel you really need to do it!

You can either take Law as a Degree straight away after A levels or take another degree and then do a conversion course so you still have lots of options.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by anonymous1231231)
Dunno if I’m tired or if this is just pure trash
Aye, I think it might be both with an emphasis on the latter. I like how the poster doesn't mention the "theoretical" tick-box subjects A-Level students invariably have to do (e.g. general studies). 45 IB is much harder than A*A*A*.
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anonymous1231231
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Aye, I think it might be both with an emphasis on the latter. I like how the poster doesn't mention the "theoretical" tick-box subjects A-Level students invariably have to do (e.g. general studies). 45 IB is much harder than A*A*A*.
v true
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Shree515)
despite one having the reputation of being a qualification undertaken by only the 'smartest'
Which one?

Having to read lots of 'books' and developing peripheral skills such as time management aren't mutually exclusive - the IB offers its candidates an opportunity to develo both :/

(I have very little respect for A-levels but that's another story)
Last edited by JohanGRK; 3 weeks ago
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Shree515
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Which one?

Having to read lots of 'books' and developing peripheral skills such as time management aren't mutually exclusive - the IB offers its candidates an opportunity to develo both :/

(I have very little respect for A-levels but that's another story)
I totally agree with you. I just meant that A Levels doesn't offer EE or CAS or TOK like the IB does. My sister did the IB and it was very vigorous.

I'm talking about IB; the previous school I went to prided themselves on being the best school offering the best and 'most challenging' curriculum. The whole 'A Levels Vs IB' thing was a daily topic at school and almost everyone said A Levels were for 'ok' people but IB was for the best.

Anyways, why do you have little respect for A Levels? I'm starting A Levels in August so I want to know if I'm missing out on a huge negative about the qualification.

Thanks!
Last edited by Shree515; 3 weeks ago
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m0209
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any subjects would allow you to take a law degree, really. i agree with what has been said above though advising you to take three a levels rather than four (unless you can 100% manage it).

history is an extremely popular a level choice for law (along with english literature), which i definitely suggest that you keep! whilst taking facilitating subjects is great for competitive russell group universities, i'm not sure how much relevance you would get out of taking chemistry a level.

psychology is quite useful in relation to a law degree (e.g - learning about the reliability of eyewitness testimonies, restorative justice, ethics). i would say history, maths and psychology are a great combination for law
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