B1449 – Licensing of Drivers Bill 2019 Watch

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B1449 – Licensing of Drivers Bill 2019, TSR Government
A
BILL
TO

fortify the provisions surrounding the licensing of drivers, notably surrounding the validity of licenses, the procedure for the renewal of licences and the declaration of medical conditions whilst in possession a licence

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1(X)Definitions
(X) (1) a ‘driving license’ shall refer to documentation issued by the relevant authority, as defined, that, subject to the Road Traffic Act 1988, authorises the holder to operate and otherwise drive motor vehicles on public roads.
(X) (2) the ‘relevant authority’ shall refer to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) or equivalent.
(X) (3) the ‘administrative validity period’ shall refer to the duration from the date of issue for which a driving license remains valid, barring disqualification, suspension or revocation.
(X) (4) an ‘age of maturity’ shall refer to the age of fifty years.
(X) (5) a ‘benchmark age’ shall refer to the ages of sixty years, sixty-five years, seventy years and every three years thereafter.
(X) (X) (a) ‘odd benchmark ages’ shall refer to the ages of sixty years, seventy years, seventy-six years and every six years thereafter.
(X) (6) a ‘Statement of Possession’ shall refer to a document as issued by the relevant authority authorising the holder of a driving license to continue to exercise the authorisation to operate a motor vehicle on public roads whilst his license is in possession of said relevant authority.
(X) (7) a ‘medical statement’ shall refer to a document as issued by a general practitioner registered with the General Medical Council detailing the professional judgement of the general practitioner in the holder’s medical ability to safely operate a motor vehicle, especially at high speed.
(X) (X) (a) to be ‘verified and valid’, the document must bear the signature of the general practitioner, the stamp of the practice, a date in the last thirty days, a measurement of the holder’s systolic and diastolic blood pressure recorded in the last thirty days, a list of the medical conditions of the holder, a list of the medications prescribed to the holder, the date of the last full medical examination, details concerning any short-term illness in the last six months which may impair driving ability and any other concerns or information that the general practitioner deems pertinent.
(X) (8) the ‘validity process’, ‘maturity process’, ‘benchmarking process’, ‘appearance process’, ‘impairment process’, and the ‘deterioration process’ shall be defined as within the stipulations of this Bill.

2(X)Requirement to hold license
(1) There shall be no change to the provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1988 insofar as affecting the ‘requirement to hold license’ to operate a motor vehicle in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

3(X)Administrative validity period
(1) The ‘administrative validity period’ for all standard driving licenses shall be as follows:-
(X) (a) where the holder has not yet reached the age of sixty years, ten years;
(X) (b) where the holder has not yet reached the age of seventy years but has surpassed the age of sixty years, five years;
(X) (c) where the holder has surpassed the age of seventy years, three years.
(2) Where the ‘administrative validity period’ as defined in this Bill does not match that on the driving license, whichever is shortest shall apply.

4(X)Requirement to renew
(1) Holders who wish to continue to operate a motor vehicle under the terms of the Road Traffic Act 1988 must contact the relevant authority when:-
(X) (a) the administrative validity period has lapsed;
(X) (b) the holder reaches the ‘age of maturity’ or a new ‘benchmark age’;
(X) (c) there is a significant change in appearance such that it may no longer be possible to confidently identify the holder from the picture on the driving license;
(X) (d) there is a significant change in the medical situation of the holder such that their driving ability may be adversely impaired;
(X) (e) the holder has failed to operate a motor vehicle in the United Kingdom of Great Britain, the European Union or European Economic Area for a continuous period exceeding fifteen years.

4(X)General renewals
(1) Where the administrative validity period has lapsed and the holder has not reached the age of maturity or a benchmark age (“the validity process”),
(X) (a) the holder shall hereby be required to report to the relevant authority providing identification documentation, the driving license and the relevant fees;
(X) (b) the holder, upon reporting to the relevant authority, shall receive a ‘Statement of Possession’.
(2) Where the holder has reached the age of maturity but has yet to reach a benchmark age, or has reached a new benchmark age that is not an odd benchmark age (“the maturity process”),
(X) (a) the holder shall hereby be required to report to the relevant authority providing identification documentation, the driving license and the relevant fees;
(X) (b) the holder must also provide a verified and valid medical statement from his general practitioner.
(X) (c) the holder, upon reporting to the relevant authority and providing a verified and valid medical statement, shall receive a ‘Statement of Possession’.
(X) (X) (i) where internal checks and liasioning with the general practitioner by the relevant authority prove the medical statement to be invalid, or where there is reasonable doubt concerning the legitimacy of the medical statement, the relevant authority retains the right to withhold the provision of a ‘Statement of Possession’ and where necessary revoke an existing one.
(3) Where the holder has reached a new odd benchmark age (“the benchmarking process”),
(X) (a) the holder shall hereby be required to retake all elements of the driving test.
(X) (b) the holder will not be issued with a ‘Statement of Possession’ and may not drive - barring under the terms of provisional drivers - unless and until they pass all elements of the driving test.
(X) (c) upon passing all elements of the driving test, the holder shall be required to undertake all remaining elements of the maturity process.
(4) The holder may, at their discretion, seek to undergo the relevant process upto six months prior to the required date; under these circumstances and upon the renewal of the driving license, the administrative validity period shall restart with upto six months being carried over.
(5) Where the holder seeks to renew their license under ss. (4) through the benchmarking process, they be able to continue to drive until the date as so they are mandated to renew their license - that is to say, until they reach an odd benchmark age.

5(X)Extraordinary renewals
(1) Where a significant change in appearance has occurred such that it may no longer be possible to confidently identify the holder from the picture on the driving license (“the appearance process”),
(X) (a) the holder shall hereby be required to report to the relevant authority providing identification documentation, the driving license and the relevant fees;
(X) (b) the holder is also required to provide photographs countersigned by an independent professional and in accordance with standard countersigning procedure as part of the application for a passport.
(X) (c) the holder, upon reporting to the relevant authority, shall receive a ‘Statement of Possession’.
(2) Where there has been a significant change in the medical situation of the holder such that their driving ability may be adversely impaired (“the impairment process”),
(X) (a) the holder shall be required to notify the relevant authority of said change, after which the relevant authority may instruct the holder to undergo the benchmarking process.
(X) (b) the holder must follow the advice of his general practitioner or medical professional in whether he should continue to drive.
(3) Where the holder has failed to operate a motor vehicle in the United Kingdom of Great Britain, the European Union or European Economic Area for a continuous period exceeding fifteen years (“deterioration process”),
(X) (a) the holder must forfeit his license to the relevant authority.
(X) (b) if the holder wishes to continue to drive, they must follow the provisions of the benchmarking process.

7(X)Failure to renew
(1) For the purposes of s. 103 of the Road Traffic Act 1988, if the holder of a license fails to comply with the provisions of this Bill, he is to be treated as ‘disqualified’.
(2) Upon successful renewal, he is no longer ‘disqualified’ such that s. 103(2) shall no longer apply.
(3) To that end, a holder who fails to comply with the provisions of this Bill may be subject to penalties up to scale level 5 of standard scale.

8(X)Extent
(1) Where there exist conflicts, the licensing arrangements of this Bill shall take precedence over the provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1988 and all associated secondary legislation.

9(X)Citation and Commencement:
(1) This act extends to the whole of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
(2) This act will come into force on the 2nd of January 2020.
(3) This act may be cited as the Licensing of Drivers Bill 2019

Notes
Spoiler:
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The licensing arrangements of the United Kingdom are far too lax in terms of age and ability; the onus remains on the driver to report any changes in their circumstances to the relevant authority, and there exists no need for medical statements at the point of renewal - a phenomenon adopted with success in Continental Europe.

To that end, this Bill adapts the licensing provisions of the United Kingdom for the modern age:

In terms of validity:
(X) - licenses remain valid for 10 years upto the age of 60;
(X) - from 60, licenses only remain valid for 5 years;
(X) - from 70, licenses only remain valid for 3 years;

In terms of renewal procedure:
(X) - from 50, a medical statement becomes required;
(X) - at 60, 70, 76 and every six years afterwards, both the theory and practical tests must be retaken

Other slight changes include;
(X) - provisions for a change in appearance;
(X) - provisions for the loss of license through non-usage

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Jammy Duel
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*look at notes* yup, as expected, drive older drivers off the road with excess bureacracy
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Connor27
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Bureaucracy in this case is good in light of the Prince Phillip incident - older drivers do pose a genuine risk.
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Andrew97
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
*look at notes* yup, as expected, drive older drivers off the road with excess bureacracy
This isn’t about just driving older drivers off the road. It is helping to improve safety by getting those who are not fit to drive off the road.

Testing and their standards has changed drastically since a 70 year old (for example) last took their test, it’s only fair we restest people as they age (and thus loose vital skills such as reaction time) in order to keep the public safe.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Andrew97)
This isn’t about just driving older drivers off the road. It is helping to improve safety by getting those who are not fit to drive off the road.

Testing and their standards has changed drastically since a 70 year old (for example) last took their test, it’s only fair we restest people as they age (and thus loose vital skills such as reaction time) in order to keep the public safe.
And I would wager that over 99% of people would fail their test if they were made to retake it even mere months after passing, the simple fact of the matter is that you learn to drive in a certain way and then never drive like that again. Does anybody seriously feed the wheel when driving, or even hold a consistent 10-2 hand placement? Do they look in the mirrors anywhere near as often or deliberately as expected in a driving test? Do they as clearly stop when expected to in a test, for instance when coming to a crossing stop when somebody is getting near in case they are crossing even if there is no way in hell the pedestrian will get there first?

Driving tests are half decent at determining whether somebody is safe to drive on their own, it is not suitable for assessing whether somebody that has been safely driving for decades still is and certainly isn't suitable for assessing the main hazards that exist when it comes to older or otherwise potentially compromised people driving such as reaction times or even general awareness.

I'd like to hear how many members of the house that hold full licences and drive regularly do drive as they would be expected to in a test: I can say that I do not feed *ever*; often don't 10-2; tbh probably don't check mirrors as often as I perhaps should; use judgement to determine whether to stop at crossings, certainly don't always deal with them as expected in test; and while talking of judgement the same goes for roundabouts, I go when it is safe to do so based on the indications and body language of other drivers, I don't wait for as much of an indication as expected in a test. I will openly say that the way I drive would result in a failure on a driving test, or at least plenty of minors, simply because nobody in the real world drives like they're on a test.
Last edited by Jammy Duel; 3 weeks ago
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mr T 999
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In the notes it mentions "licenses remain valid for 10 years upto the age of 60" does this mean once you passed your test you'll have to retake your driving test every 10 years up until aged 60?
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jameswhughes
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(Original post by Andrew97)
This isn’t about just driving older drivers off the road. It is helping to improve safety by getting those who are not fit to drive off the road.

Testing and their standards has changed drastically since a 70 year old (for example) last took their test, it’s only fair we restest people as they age (and thus loose vital skills such as reaction time) in order to keep the public safe.
I don't think more testing would help, isn't experience what's really necessary with driving? I'd trust a 60 year old who passed his test 40 years ago much more than a teenager who has just passed, even if his test was up to a more modern standard.

One thing I think would be a good idea would be a graduated driving license e.g. you can have lessons and practice as a 17 year old, but can only drive on your own when you're 18, or something similar.
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(Original post by mr T 999)
In the notes it mentions "licenses remain valid for 10 years upto the age of 60" does this mean once you passed your test you'll have to retake your driving test every 10 years up until aged 60?
No - "10 years of validity" refers to the "administrative validity period"; the photocard element would need renewing - a retest would not be required.
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(Original post by jameswhughes)
I don't think more testing would help, isn't experience what's really necessary with driving? I'd trust a 60 year old who passed his test 40 years ago much more than a teenager who has just passed, even if his test was up to a more modern standard.

One thing I think would be a good idea would be a graduated driving license e.g. you can have lessons and practice as a 17 year old, but can only drive on your own when you're 18, or something similar.
Experience no doubt helps, however you could equally argue somebody who just passed is a competent driver (fresh in the mind and all that). The issue this bill brings up is one of safety. Older drivers are more likely to have medical issues, eyesight problems, reaction times etc that impact on their driving skills. This bill aims to sort that out.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Andrew97)
Experience no doubt helps, however you could equally argue somebody who just passed is a competent driver (fresh in the mind and all that). The issue this bill brings up is one of safety. Older drivers are more likely to have medical issues, eyesight problems, reaction times etc that impact on their driving skills. This bill aims to sort that out.
So why are both theory and practical tests required for penisoners, something that does not achieve the stated goals because they are designed to test basic road safety, they're a substitute for experience, they do not particularly test medical issues, eyesight issues, or reaction times or at least not reliably.
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
So why are both theory and practical tests required for penisoners, something that does not achieve the stated goals because they are designed to test basic road safety, they're a substitute for experience, they do not particularly test medical issues, eyesight issues, or reaction times or at least not reliably.
The hazard perception tests reaction times.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by Andrew97)
The hazard perception tests reaction times.
Hazard perception tests that you aren't dead
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
So why are both theory and practical tests required for penisoners, something that does not achieve the stated goals because they are designed to test basic road safety, they're a substitute for experience, they do not particularly test medical issues, eyesight issues, or reaction times or at least not reliably.
The theory test would act as a 'refresher' and given the potential 40 year gap between testing and the proposed retesting would draw attention to any changes in the law or practice e.g. variable speed limits, daylight running lights, the use of mobile phones at the wheel etc.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by ns_2)
The theory test would act as a 'refresher' and given the potential 40 year gap between testing and the proposed retesting would draw attention to any changes in the law or practice e.g. variable speed limits, daylight running lights, the use of mobile phones at the wheel etc.
One would hope that 40 years behind the wheel would prove said experience, or at the very least basic common sense would get through the theory test, just as it should the first time round.
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
One would hope that 40 years behind the wheel would prove said experience, or at the very least basic common sense would get through the theory test, just as it should the first time round.
One would indeed hope.
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
*look at notes* yup, as expected, drive older drivers off the road with excess bureacracy
Good. Producing safer, cleaner roads.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by ns_2)
One would indeed hope.
Which makes that ultimately irrelevant, then having a pulse will see you pass the hazard perception because the windows to click are so masssive and the score threshold is so low, and then everyone fails the practical because nobody drives as they are expected to.

(Original post by 04MR17)
Good. Producing safer, cleaner roads.
If you want safer roads you should be setting a minimum age in the 30s with incident rates for crashes over over 80s being lower than for all cohorts under the age of 30 and not much higher than those in their 30s
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
If you want safer roads you should be setting a minimum age in the 30s with incident rates for crashes over over 80s being lower than for all cohorts under the age of 30 and not much higher than those in their 30s
You don't deny this helps though. I'm glad you agree.
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Why should the theory tests be retaken every 6 years repeatedly? I could understand taking it again once after you've passed a certain age threshold, but repeatedly seems excessive. For a 60 year old the theory may have changed since they took their test at 18 but when they are 66 do they really need to take it again?

I can understand the intentions of the bill but as to my intentions on how to vote for it, I remain undecided.
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Good. Producing safer, cleaner roads.
The myth around older drivers being death traps is not true and this fact is widely reported. In the majority of studies, younger drivers are deemed to be more dangerous.

Producing safer roads would be to get rid of all these young ***** in their Corsas, BMW M3s, Citreon Saxos, Golfs etc that drive like they stole it.

For someone who is so into evidence to back up their points, your post here is baseless.
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