Do you think eating better can help mental health? Watch

PositiveThoughts
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I’ve heard someone mention this before and just wanted to hear other people’s thoughts on this.
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Kancho
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Generally, eating healthy and a good amount usually keeps you awake and less anxious. When you eat too much or too little, I find my self feeling low and tired. Also unmotivated. - which could lead to a vicious cycle of eating too much/little -> feeling **** about it -> eating again/not eating at all
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winterscoming
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Absolutely - try not to think of your physical health as being some separate, independent thing from physical health - everything in your body is inter-connected. The food you eat (and how much) determines whether your body is able to function properly, eating the 'wrong' kind of food can put unnecessary stress on your body physically, or it can result in your body not functioning properly if it doesn't have the essential nutrients it needs -- that kind of thing is often a reason to feel a bit down or worse.

For example - just imagine how you feel mentally when you've got a cold or flu -- most people don't really feel very active or happy because their body is stressed out trying to deal with the bug.

It's the same kind of thing when you've done something like having a whole day eating nothing but "junk food" - e.g. imagine you didn't eat anything other than chocolate and fizzy drinks all day -- you'd probably spend most of it on a sugar and caffiene rush, but by the end of it you'd probably feel a bit sick, probably have a bad headache, and you'd probably feel really tired, lethargic, miserable.-- worse still, when you eat that kind of stuff it causes you to "crave" even more of it, and it can lead to all kinds of uneasy, anxious, stressful feelings making it harder to sleep or focus and probably having no motivation to do anything.

On the other hand, if you're feeling down after having had several days of eating/drinking a lot of unhealthy stuff, try having a whole day cutting out all the junk, drinking lots of plain water, eating loads of fresh fruit & veg (especially leafy greens), some good fats and proteins like eggs, nuts, fish and beans, and sticking to healthy grains like brown rice. Most people having a few days eating like that will usually find themselves feeling much better, their overall sense of wellbeing is much higher, easier to relax and focus, easier to sleep.

The key is everything in moderation of course. non-stop junk-food is very likely to make you feel really bad, although you don't need to eat like a rabbit to be healthy. Some moderate exercise is also important - even if that's just an hour or two of walking every day that can make a really big difference - exercise can be very cathartic.
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Decahedron
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Without a doubt it helps.

Dude above has covered all the explanation required.
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Ciel.
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(Original post by PositiveThoughts)
I’ve heard someone mention this before and just wanted to hear other people’s thoughts on this.
To an extent, yeah. But a lot of claims you see about certain diets (like the raw diet, super foods, etc.) being a cure are completely false. Still, eating healthy can make you feel better in many ways - e.g. junk food makes you feel lethargic, while fresh fruit and veg can be refreshing and will give you more energy - physically and mentally. Also certain nutrient deficiencies can make you feel tired and demotivated too.
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PositiveThoughts
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Absolutely - try not to think of your physical health as being some separate, independent thing from physical health - everything in your body is inter-connected. The food you eat (and how much) determines whether your body is able to function properly, eating the 'wrong' kind of food can put unnecessary stress on your body physically, or it can result in your body not functioning properly if it doesn't have the essential nutrients it needs -- that kind of thing is often a reason to feel a bit down or worse.

For example - just imagine how you feel mentally when you've got a cold or flu -- most people don't really feel very active or happy because their body is stressed out trying to deal with the bug.

It's the same kind of thing when you've done something like having a whole day eating nothing but "junk food" - e.g. imagine you didn't eat anything other than chocolate and fizzy drinks all day -- you'd probably spend most of it on a sugar and caffiene rush, but by the end of it you'd probably feel a bit sick, probably have a bad headache, and you'd probably feel really tired, lethargic, miserable.-- worse still, when you eat that kind of stuff it causes you to "crave" even more of it, and it can lead to all kinds of uneasy, anxious, stressful feelings making it harder to sleep or focus and probably having no motivation to do anything.

On the other hand, if you're feeling down after having had several days of eating/drinking a lot of unhealthy stuff, try having a whole day cutting out all the junk, drinking lots of plain water, eating loads of fresh fruit & veg (especially leafy greens), some good fats and proteins like eggs, nuts, fish and beans, and sticking to healthy grains like brown rice. Most people having a few days eating like that will usually find themselves feeling much better, their overall sense of wellbeing is much higher, easier to relax and focus, easier to sleep.

The key is everything in moderation of course. non-stop junk-food is very likely to make you feel really bad, although you don't need to eat like a rabbit to be healthy. Some moderate exercise is also important - even if that's just an hour or two of walking every day that can make a really big difference - exercise can be very cathartic.
Thank you so much for this. I think it will really benefit me as lately I have felt really lethargic which worsens my depression overall, and it is probably partially to do with my diet. Excellent response.
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