UK employment total hits record high Watch

username1738683
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ONS head of labour market David Freeman said: "The number of people working grew again, with the share of the population in work now the highest on record.

"Meanwhile, the share of the workforce looking for work and unable to find it remains at its lowest for over 40 years, helped by a record number of job vacancies.

"Wage growth continues to outpace inflation, which fell back slightly in the latest month."
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46958560

At the end of another day when nothing much truly happened, the media scene has somehow managed to find lots of other things to talk about. Nobody can say this isn't news in the public interest and of great relevance to everyone, if we look at journalism under such guidelines. I know I do.

Didn't see it in the headlines at the newstands, didn't go on telly, BBC radio for a while enjoying the snow in traffic was the only point of contact. 2 had a slot for it in the news bulletin somewhere, radio 4 had even less than that. Just the predictable banging of the Brexit drum, hours of idle and unproductive speculation and downbeat tone that is often better explained by a sceptical approach. Not that much in the public interest, according to dwindling figures.

So why don't the media make something like this the news of the day, what criterium do they apply in their newsrooms when exercising that almighty prerogative of deciding what is news and what isn't? We do understand why media outlets committed to an anti-Brexit agenda put the scissors to it, how it represents 'bad news' in their eyes and that is understandable but why not the BBC? What is their criterium?

Of course, if this is something they amply covered on telly during the day we will just forget it. How, despite Brexit...
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Decahedron
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Because with record levels of employment we still have record levels of homelessness and poverty, especially poverty in working households.
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DrMikeHuntHertz
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Many register as self-employed and do odd jobs to try and get by, unemployment rates mean very little nowadays.
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Profesh
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The devil, as ever, tends to lurk in the details.
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Violet Femme
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A statistics bulletin reporting a continuing trend is not that major a news story.
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Salostar
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It'll be interesting to have a look at their methodology, particularly in how they record the number of jobs and compare them to the population.

For example, I've had three jobs on the go at the same time within the last year (currently 2), depending on how it's worked out is that just myself counted as employed in the figures or that each of the three jobs are counted and compared to the total population and it looks like three people are employed?
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username1738683
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(Original post by Violet Femme)
A statistics bulletin reporting a continuing trend is not that major a news story.
Only because it doesn't fit the Guardian/BBCs anti-Brexit/Tory narrative, were the 'stats' damning in that respect and they would make the front page and open every news bulletin. Then they would be as much in the public interest as today's header, 'British firms hit panic button over Brexit' with a set of figures to go.

As long as you people don't pretend any of that is proper journalism, that's fine with me. The Guardian are a political publication who will inform you only of what fits their political narrative and the BBC are pretty much becoming the same as an extension. That's why they deliberately avoid publicising any positive economic news that make Brexit look anything less than Armaggeddon, you know that full well.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Salostar)
It'll be interesting to have a look at their methodology, particularly in how they record the number of jobs and compare them to the population.

For example, I've had three jobs on the go at the same time within the last year (currently 2), depending on how it's worked out is that just myself counted as employed in the figures or that each of the three jobs are counted and compared to the total population and it looks like three people are employed?
They would indeed include you thrice since they survey business and not hard however the number of people working multiple jobs is pretty low.
(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
Many register as self-employed and do odd jobs to try and get by, unemployment rates mean very little nowadays.
The Labour market statistics will include those in total employment however growth over the past few years has been driven by full time employment so it’s less of a distortion than you imagine. Despite the corbyn rhetoric self employment and part time employment make up a small proportion of new jobs.
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DrMikeHuntHertz
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(Original post by Rakas21)
The Labour market statistics will include those in total employment however growth over the past few years has been driven by full time employment so it’s less of a distortion than you imagine. Despite the corbyn rhetoric self employment and part time employment make up a small proportion of new jobs.
Full time, which when one does the calculation of minimum wage x 30 hours per week... not much per year.
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I'm with the left on this.. quality of jobs is just as important as quantity.. and the tories (and labour before them, but they got away with it due to the post-2000s economic boom) have been exceptional at creating more and more.. but worse and worse.. jobs.

50 years ago a father working a manual labor manufacturing job could support a family and buy a house... if his wife worked as well, they would be very comfortable.. if he moved up to lower-level management he was middleclass, and comfortable for the rest of his days... retired with a good pension, and a reasonably young age.

Today a father working a manul labour manufacturing job (if he can find one), cannot buy a home on his own.. cannot support a family on his own. His wife MUST work, and even with her working they will struggle to get by due to child-care costs. If they do manage to save enough for a deposit, they will be saddled with debt far higher then any previous generation. If he moved up to lower-level management, his family may have enough money not to worry about running out each month.. he will retire far later than any of the previous two generations.. and to far less money (proportionally). If the pension system is still functional by that point (given the black hole in its finances, that's questionable at best...) His best hope of gaining assets and financial security is that his older family die.

More jobs are great.. but as long as the trend in the quality of jobs is downwards, its not progress.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
Full time, which when one does the calculation of minimum wage x 30 hours per week... not much per year.
I believe the ONS define full time employment as 36 hours however even if your assertion is correct, there is no evidence that these are minimum wage jobs. Indeed labour market tightening has driven up average wage growth.
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
I'm with the left on this.. quality of jobs is just as important as quantity.. and the tories (and labour before them, but they got away with it due to the post-2000s economic boom) have been exceptional at creating more and more.. but worse and worse.. jobs.

50 years ago a father working a manual labor manufacturing job could support a family and buy a house... if his wife worked as well, they would be very comfortable.. if he moved up to lower-level management he was middleclass, and comfortable for the rest of his days... retired with a good pension, and a reasonably young age.

Today a father working a manul labour manufacturing job (if he can find one), cannot buy a home on his own.. cannot support a family on his own. His wife MUST work, and even with her working they will struggle to get by due to child-care costs. If they do manage to save enough for a deposit, they will be saddled with debt far higher then any previous generation. If he moved up to lower-level management, his family may have enough money not to worry about running out each month.. he will retire far later than any of the previous two generations.. and to far less money (proportionally). If the pension system is still functional by that point (given the black hole in its finances, that's questionable at best...) His best hope of gaining assets and financial security is that his older family die.

More jobs are great.. but as long as the trend in the quality of jobs is downwards, its not progress.
You speak of job quality but is that not more to do with the cost of living and policy failure rather than vastly poorer jobs. Average wage growth in the UK has (bar parts of the last decade) kept pace or exceeded inflation while a lot of utilities have grown even faster, not to mention house price growth.
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DrMikeHuntHertz
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I believe the ONS define full time employment as 36 hours however even if your assertion is correct, there is no evidence that these are minimum wage jobs. Indeed labour market tightening has driven up average wage growth.
But is there evidence that they are not minimum wage jobs?
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Rakas21
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
But is there evidence that they are not minimum wage jobs?
Having not read a labour market survey for about six months i cannot say definitively however the fact that average wages for new jobs rose in 2018 rather than fell means that by definition, more than half of those are paid 'well' so i stand by my point.
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DSilva
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(Original post by zhog)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46958560

At the end of another day when nothing much truly happened, the media scene has somehow managed to find lots of other things to talk about. Nobody can say this isn't news in the public interest and of great relevance to everyone, if we look at journalism under such guidelines. I know I do.

Didn't see it in the headlines at the newstands, didn't go on telly, BBC radio for a while enjoying the snow in traffic was the only point of contact. 2 had a slot for it in the news bulletin somewhere, radio 4 had even less than that. Just the predictable banging of the Brexit drum, hours of idle and unproductive speculation and downbeat tone that is often better explained by a sceptical approach. Not that much in the public interest, according to dwindling figures.

So why don't the media make something like this the news of the day, what criterium do they apply in their newsrooms when exercising that almighty prerogative of deciding what is news and what isn't? We do understand why media outlets committed to an anti-Brexit agenda put the scissors to it, how it represents 'bad news' in their eyes and that is understandable but why not the BBC? What is their criterium?

Of course, if this is something they amply covered on telly during the day we will just forget it. How, despite Brexit...
So you're complaining about the BBC not covering a story while at the same time linking to a BBC news article showing them covering the story.

As for the BBC being anti Tory, just lol.
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username1738683
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
But is there evidence that they are not minimum wage jobs?
It doesn't matter whether they are minimum wage jobs anymore than it does when it comes to the 'potential' and 'expected' job losses at Dyson's or Santander, what is debatable is whether we should be told solely about the latter at every news bulletin by parts of the media who totally ignore historic low levels of unemployment when announced.

Doesn't add up, what sort of criterium is that? Jobs are jobs, the people losing them would be interested to know there is a ticking market out there. Radio 4 cover all job losses (even before they happen, quite often) but no openings, with a constant search for Brexit ramifications to attach to them. Not a word on this report yesterday, had the 'bad news' all over the news bulletins today. It's that half empty glass, no doubt.

Immigration policies have done more to keep people on the minimum wage than anything else, another one we would never be told about by the BBC. Well done to the poster who found three jobs to do, shows there are a few going. Terrible, innit?
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username1738683
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(Original post by DSilva)
So you're complaining about the BBC not covering a story while at the same time linking to a BBC news article showing them covering the story.

As for the BBC being anti Tory, just lol.
Don't you start trivializing it, it's not a story. It's something quite relevant to everybody's lives, including ours. Why it is relegated to second plan by so many other stories of much less relevance is a mystery. It also rains in the anti-Brexit narrative parade.

Yes, they have a link to it in the online business section. They had to bury it somewhere just for the sake of appearances, that's all.
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DSilva
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(Original post by zhog)
Don't you start trivializing it, it's not a story. It's something quite relevant to everybody's lives, including ours. Why it is relegated to second plan by so many other stories of much less relevance is a mystery. It also rains in the anti-Brexit narrative parade.

Yes, they have a link to it in the online business section. They had to bury it somewhere just for the sake of appearances, that's all.
It was reported and was one of the main stories yesterday. You seen to be complaining that a business related story was put in their business section... Next you'll be complaining about recipes being put in their food section.

Obviously employment figures are relevant, but just as relevant is how homelessness has soared over the last few years.
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AdamCurtis
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If you think 12 hours a week here or there washing up plates or cleaning floors is going to benefit anyone you are sorely mistaken. Why cant we just lay off the working class and admit selling our manufucting industry (and soon our high tech and finance) to Asia was a catastrophic decision. In the meantime roll out decent universal credit and admit society has failed.
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(Original post by AdamCurtis)
If you think 12 hours a week here or there washing up plates or cleaning floors is going to benefit anyone you are sorely mistaken. Why cant we just lay off the working class and admit selling our manufucting industry (and soon our high tech and finance) to Asia was a catastrophic decision. In the meantime roll out decent universal credit and admit society has failed.
Fair enough, vote Labour and live a life of state dependency if that's more to your liking. Washing up plates and cleaning floors, that's for immigrants because we're all too good for it, innit? That's the leftist discourse in a nutshell.
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(Original post by DSilva)
Obviously employment figures are relevant, but just as relevant is how homelessness has soared over the last few years.
Ha, but every day we hear about job losses and not about job creation. Everyday this week I've heard Radio 4 include in their news bulletins the situation at Dyson, Santander and others but not a single word on record high employment. As you say. the BBC should regard both issues equally relevant, if only they weren't out to be politically partial and motivated about it.

Within a decade, all traces of Conservatism will have been shown the door and the Corporation will be a steaming social-engine with a mission to promote the 'correct' attitudes in society and combat the 'wrong' ones. The Tories and some of my fellow righties are absolute mugs for underestimating the nature of the beast, they are like those who always played the Hitlerian threat down even after he tried a putcsh and published his plans.

We can only wonder how someone wearing a MAGA hat at Brodcasting House would go down, that's got to be the safest way to get a table for yourself at the canteen. Yes, that's the totally unbiased and political impartial BBC we're talking here.
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