Is it worth doing msc in immunology? Watch

shahlakh
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I have been wondering whether my selection of Masters in immunology would bear me any fruit...Because I do not want to end up struggling for jobs. In other words does immunology have a high job scope? And do the scientists with immunolgy have high pay?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Consider the following b4 deciding:-
a) if money is your main incentive, doing another UG degree e.g. in dentistry, or if you are flexible with subjects, accountancy or business studies, would be much better.
b) there is considerable and increasing demand for immunologists, particularly in view of the fact that pharmaceutical research is concentrating quite heavily on targetted therapy of diseases with specific antibodies against e.g. neoplastic cells, being a major part of this (employers that make a lot of money can afford to pay well, and pharmas make big money [I have worked in this sector, although I am a hopeless academic [dreadfully not money-minded]!).
c) I was offered an MSc in Medical Immunology at St Thomas' Hospital in London a short while ago (I won't tell you exactly when as you will put on your Usain Bolt shoes if I do! ); I decided not to take it up, mainly because I do not like lab work, and there was a lot of that in the course. If you like dealing with instruments (now very computerized) e.g. in immunohistochemistry, radioimmunoassay, etc. then this would be a positive point.
d) One other consideration is the nature of your UG degree (assuming you did one!) - if it was in an arts subject, you might find an MSc in a science/medical subject hard going.
e) Have you got any other offers for other science masters? Look at the pros/cons of these, too.

Weigh up your alternatives, if necessary mathematically as I do for making decisions in life, and make an informed decision.

Best of luck!
M
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shahlakh
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Consider the following b4 deciding:-
a) if money is your main incentive, doing another UG degree e.g. in dentistry, or if you are flexible with subjects, accountancy or business studies, would be much better.
b) there is considerable and increasing demand for immunologists, particularly in view of the fact that pharmaceutical research is concentrating quite heavily on targetted therapy of diseases with specific antibodies against e.g. neoplastic cells, being a major part of this (employers that make a lot of money can afford to pay well, and pharmas make big money [I have worked in this sector, although I am a hopeless academic [dreadfully not money-minded]!).
c) I was offered an MSc in Medical Immunology at St Thomas' Hospital in London a short while ago (I won't tell you exactly when as you will put on your Usain Bolt shoes if I do! ); I decided not to take it up, mainly because I do not like lab work, and there was a lot of that in the course. If you like dealing with instruments (now very computerized) e.g. in immunohistochemistry, radioimmunoassay, etc. then this would be a positive point.
d) One other consideration is the nature of your UG degree (assuming you did one!) - if it was in an arts subject, you might find an MSc in a science/medical subject hard going.
e) Have you got any other offers for other science masters? Look at the pros/cons of these, too.

Weigh up your alternatives, if necessary mathematically as I do for making decisions in life, and make an informed decision.

Best of luck!
M
First of all, Thanks a lot for your response. It means a lot to me Yes I have done bachelors in Applied biosciences. My main incentive is money. Because I know some acquaintances, who did select a field of their interests and end up being jobless as their professions became less demanding. So that is like my major fear. I know in medical research areas one should be passionate but sometimes we need to take the job market into consideration. I do not plan to change my field to business or accountancy or spend another four years completing dentistry. But as you said that pharmacdeutical companies are in need of immunologist researchers and they possess enough money to pay their employees, so that clears my confusion I guess.
PS: I have grown passion for immunology during my four years of bachelors. Luckily, job growth for immunology scientists seems quite positive from what you have stated and from my own research.
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