Have your say: Students want unconditional offers to be regulated, survey reveals Watch

candokoala
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Here's where you can post a comment about our Students want unconditional offers to be regulated, survey reveals article.

The BBC are looking for a case study - are you a student who has received an unconditional offer? Message She-Ra Puddles the Monkey or email [email protected] m

Read the full Students want unconditional offers to be regulated, survey reveals article and join in the discussion by posting a message below.
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JohanGRK
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agreed tbf
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Moments
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The whole idea of unconditional offers is ridiculous, they should only be given with a scholarship.
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FloralHybrid
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I think they should be scrapped entirely, yeah. Keep them only for when a student is applying post - qualification so has already met the conditions.

If a university really likes you, they can give you a reduced a level offer. But people get lulled in by the unconditional aspect and think their a-levels don’t matter and it’s a silly way of universities trying to secure students funding.
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
it’s a silly way of universities trying to secure students funding.
Indeed, they if they believe in a student so much that traditional yardsticks do not apply to that person, then they should put the money up for their education; because such talent should not have to worry about money.
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She-Ra
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If anyone is interested in sharing their unconditional story with the BBC, let me know
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piupiupiupiu
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Forgive me, about to do a 'in my day' post... which I hate... BUT - when I applied to uni, the only people I knew who got unconditional offers were those applying as mature students who already had the necessary A-levels. ANYBODY still doing their A-levels was given a conditional offer, even if they were excellent candidates and / or the grade offer was low.
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I feel the system is flawed but at least in Scotland it seems to be better as it’s mainly only those that already have the required highers that are sent unconditional offers. Maybe the english system is just flawed by it’s structure.
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ThomH97
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I think it's up to the universities. But they should not be able to stipulate that you need to put them as a firm.

If, for whatever reason, they decide you're a really good fit for their course and would sail through but don't need the pressure, then they can give an unconditional. However, to insist they be your firm just shows they are after numbers, and don't really care how you do. Of course, since employers don't really care how you do, that's a bit of a moot point at present, but the system isn't going to get fixed if universities themselves contribute to breaking it.
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Doones
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(Original post by candokoala)
Here's where you can post a comment about our Students want unconditional offers to be regulated, survey reveals article.

The BBC are looking for a case study - are you a student who has received an unconditional offer? Message She-Ra Puddles the Monkey or email [email protected] m

Read the full Students want unconditional offers to be regulated, survey reveals article and join in the discussion by posting a message below.
(Original post by She-Ra)
If anyone is interested in sharing their unconditional story with the BBC, let me know
The BBC has namechecked TSR in their coverage :yay:
Clampdown on luring students with unconditional offers
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PQ
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Waiting for the ucas data to drop next week
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by PQ)
Waiting for the ucas data to drop next week
Do you think the number of unconditionals will have risen or dropped this year :holmes:
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PQ
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
Do you think the number of unconditionals will have risen or dropped this year :holmes:
The data ucas are releasing is from 2018 and will almost certainly show an increase (although it will also show the number of unconditional if firmed offers different universities have been making too - something ucas haven’t been able to measure properly before).

I can see that it might stabilise for 2019...all the bad press and government attention doesn’t make it attractive to universities that aren’t doing it - and those that are already making unconditionals will not change their offer making mid cycle.

It’s likely to be the beginning of the end. I expect the Times to include the unconditional data in their tables (not in the rankings but as supplemental data)...
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Doones
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(Original post by PQ)
It’s likely to be the beginning of the end. I expect the Times to include the unconditional data in their tables (not in the rankings but as supplemental data)...
That could increase the number applying to those unis, only for them to be disappointed when the policy changes.

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I think the unconditional offer would be fine if everyone made them. At the moment they are being used to get people to choose them before other universities so universities can fill places. That is why they are wrong at the moment. Birmingham university who introduced them have a lot to answer for.
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When I did my uni application, I found that me and only one of my other friensds recieved a conditional offer( I applied for medical science and my mate applied for medicine); the rest of my friends recieved unconditional offers. I felt a bit left out because all my friends were more relaxed than I was about their exams as they were guaranteed to get into uni no matter what they got which is a bit unfair considering we all took the same subjects and were predicted the same grades.
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TeeCup_
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(Original post by FloralHybrid)
I think they should be scrapped entirely, yeah. Keep them only for when a student is applying post - qualification so has already met the conditions.

If a university really likes you, they can give you a reduced a level offer. But people get lulled in by the unconditional aspect and think their a-levels don’t matter and it’s a silly way of universities trying to secure students funding.
I think unconditional offers should be kept - but used how they were first intended to be. I've just finished the whole UCAS application process and only one of my choices gave me that "conditional unconditional" offer bull****. I'm not accepting for a few reasons. The rest of my offers were genuine unconditional offers because I have already met the entry requirements for the courses, and my places were also audition based since I'll be studying a music based degree.

I don't think unconditional offers should be handed out on a plate at all, they were made to give to those who have already or are guaranteed to meet the entry requirements for their chosen course. My boyfriend recently got given an unconditional offer to a university despite having 0 UCAS points (Error in a certain unit means he will have to resit it. This isn't entirely his own fault, however he hasn't actually told any of these schools his individual circumstances.) Although I'm happy he's been given a place to go - it makes no sense.

It seems that universities these days care more about the numbers that they're enrolling more than who they are enrolling. It's very disheartening to students like myself who work hard for such offers to see that students with no A-Levels or equivalent can also get the same opportunities.

The takeaway? Keep unconditional offers. They're amazing and can really boost a student's confidence (and I think even persuade them to keep working, if placed in the right hands of course.) But don't hand them out willy nilly to people who don't have the requirements. I'm a big advocate for giving everyone equal consideration but this does NOT mean the same thing as giving everyone an equal offer. I do think it's very unfair to hand out guaranteed places to people that just don't even come close to meeting the requirements. I think this is why the drop out rate is at an all time high, people who clearly aren't cut out for university are given offers to study - when really they don't belong there in the first place. I whole-heartedly agree when the article claims that most universities no longer give offers within the student's best interest.
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BasicMistake
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Give them out to those applying with results in hand and scrap the rest.

Instead, just give some more leeway in terms of hitting the entry requirement after results, if it is necessary to fill up spaces. Okay, so the people working on Clearing have to work harder but at least this way, it doesn't kill all incentive to work hard for your A Levels.
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FloralHybrid
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(Original post by TeeCup_)
I think unconditional offers should be kept - but used how they were first intended to be. I've just finished the whole UCAS application process and only one of my choices gave me that "conditional unconditional" offer bull****. I'm not accepting for a few reasons. The rest of my offers were genuine unconditional offers because I have already met the entry requirements for the courses, and my places were also audition based since I'll be studying a music based degree.

I don't think unconditional offers should be handed out on a plate at all, they were made to give to those who have already or are guaranteed to meet the entry requirements for their chosen course. My boyfriend recently got given an unconditional offer to a university despite having 0 UCAS points (Error in a certain unit means he will have to resit it. This isn't entirely his own fault, however he hasn't actually told any of these schools his individual circumstances.) Although I'm happy he's been given a place to go - it makes no sense.

It seems that universities these days care more about the numbers that they're enrolling more than who they are enrolling. It's very disheartening to students like myself who work hard for such offers to see that students with no A-Levels or equivalent can also get the same opportunities.

The takeaway? Keep unconditional offers. They're amazing and can really boost a student's confidence (and I think even persuade them to keep working, if placed in the right hands of course.) But don't hand them out willy nilly to people who don't have the requirements. I'm a big advocate for giving everyone equal consideration but this does NOT mean the same thing as giving everyone an equal offer. I do think it's very unfair to hand out guaranteed places to people that just don't even come close to meeting the requirements. I think this is why the drop out rate is at an all time high, people who clearly aren't cut out for university are given offers to study - when really they don't belong there in the first place. I whole-heartedly agree when the article claims that most universities no longer give offers within the student's best interest.
I'm slightly confused as to what you're advocating for here.

How can you be garaunteed to meet your entry requirements, if you haven't yet met them?
Do you not think most students would see an unconditional offer and take it as confirmation that they can take their foot off the pedal and get whatever grades because they're accepted a place?
I've had friends who have seen unconditional offers and been thrilled at the sight. If they are, that's great. But overall they're not a great thing, it's a way that universities just want to fill places, and as you say students like yourself who work hard on an A-Level equivelent will make it in alongside someone who got DEE a A-Level because they didn't feel the need to work hard.
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Stumpy1001
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I was under the impression unconditional offers a mainly dished out to mature students like me.

As a 30 year old my gcse,A levels and other quals ive accumulated over the time are aready done and there for the world to see . Why would a uni give me a conditional offer? conditional based on what?.

There are legitmate resasons for the unconditinal offer, just because something doesnt apply to the majority doesnt mean it should be banned or regulated any differently to any over type of offer.
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