B1450 – Christmas (Day) Trading Hours Bill 2019 Watch

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Saracen's Fez
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B1450 – Christmas (Day) Trading Hours Bill 2019, TSR Libertarian Party
Christmas (Day) Trading Hours Bill 2019

An Act to allow businesses to decide their opening hours on Christmas

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 Repeals
(1) The Christmas (day) Trading Act 2004 is hereby repealed.

2 Short title, Commencement, Extent
(1) This act may be cited as the Christmas Trading Hours Act 2019
(2) This act comes into force upon Royal Assent
(3) This act extends to the UK


Notes
Christmas (Day) Trading Act prohibits large shops (over 280 sq m/3,000 sq ft) from opening on Christmas Day.

We believe that the limit the on business hours in the modern times is archaic and distinctly anti-business. Business should be free to decide their opening hours.

Many small businesses like convenience stores, pubs and restaurants will be open on Christmas. It's only fair large businesses have the right to be open on that day.

Repeals
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2004/26/contents
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Saracen's Fez)
B1450 – Christmas (Day) Trading Hours Bill 2019, TSR Libertarian Party

Christmas (Day) Trading Hours Bill 2019

An Act to allow businesses to decide their opening hours on Christmas


BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 Repeals
(1) The Christmas (day) Trading Act 2004 is hereby repealed.

2 Short title, Commencement, Extent
(1) This act may be cited as the Christmas Trading Hours Act 2019
(2) This act comes into force upon Royal Assent
(3) This act extends to the UK


Notes
Christmas (Day) Trading Act prohibits large shops (over 280 sq m/3,000 sq ft) from opening on Christmas Day.

We believe that the limit the on business hours in the modern times is archaic and distinctly anti-business. Business should be free to decide their opening hours.

Many small businesses like convenience stores, pubs and restaurants will be open on Christmas. It's only fair large businesses have the right to be open on that day.

Repeals
https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2004/26/contents
No - large businesses already have an advantage other 364 days of the year lol
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Connor27
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Aye - the state should not impede businesses from opening when they want.
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04MR17
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Don't think it'll change much of the status quo. Most employers and employees who celebrate Christmas would want to spend it with their family rather than working.
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Joep95
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Don't think it'll change much of the status quo. Most employers and employees who celebrate Christmas would want to spend it with their family rather than working.
Most employers want to make money rather than close shops which means it’s a day they lose it instead.
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ns_2
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Aye; for the same reasons for the Sunday Trading Bill.

I assume the next bill will be on repealing 'bank holidays'...
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Jarred
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No, unless you add a provision granting an explicit opt out for working on Christmas Day. With that, I’d feel like the avenues for exploitation are much lower and would be more comfortable with supporting it.
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LemonBotex
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As Jarred said, not without protections for workers to ensure they can opt out of working it.
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SoggyCabbages
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Along with the gentlemen above, I could not vote for this unless protections for workes are guaranteed.
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Saunders16
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No, to add on to the concerns of other members I fear this would pressure people into working. This is another misjudged bill for the sake of greed and nothing more; our culture needs to shift in the other direction with our current productivity crisis.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Saunders16)
No, to add on to the concerns of other members I fear this would pressure people into working. This is another misjudged bill for the sake of greed and nothing more; our culture needs to shift in the other direction with our current productivity crisis.
I agree completely with the Leader of the Opposition.
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Connor27
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Christmas is a normal day is normal in terms of of protests for the working class I will stand up for this
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Joep95
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(Original post by Connor27)
Christmas is a normal day is normal in terms of of protests for the working class I will stand up for this
What?

what about protests?

i wonder how many people would agree Christmas is a normal day?
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Mr T 999
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(Original post by Jarred)
No, unless you add a provision granting an explicit opt out for working on Christmas Day. With that, I’d feel like the avenues for exploitation are much lower and would be more comfortable with supporting it.
(Original post by LemonBotex)
As Jarred said, not without protections for workers to ensure they can opt out of working it.
(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
Along with the gentlemen above, I could not vote for this unless protections for workes are guaranteed.
(Original post by Saunders16)
No, to add on to the concerns of other members I fear this would pressure people into working. This is another misjudged bill for the sake of greed and nothing more; our culture needs to shift in the other direction with our current productivity crisis.
(Original post by JMR2019.)
I agree completely with the Leader of the Opposition.
If a worker are a Christian and do not want to work on Christmas Day but their employer insists that they must, they may have a claim for indirect religious discrimination. If the employer fails to grant them annual leave for Christmas Day. You can establish that the refusal places them at a disadvantage when compared with employees of other or no faith.

I'll be adding a opt out scheme in the next reading.
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Saunders16
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(Original post by mr T 999)
If a worker are a Christian and do not want to work on Christmas Day but their employer insists that they must, they may have a claim for indirect religious discrimination. If the employer fails to grant them annual leave for Christmas Day. You can establish that the refusal places them at a disadvantage when compared with employees of other or no faith.

I'll be adding a opt out scheme in the next reading.
Christmas Day isn't just for Christians, what a silly response.

Edit: Your response isn't very clear but on a second read I presume you mean you will offer an opt-out to everyone?
Last edited by Saunders16; 5 months ago
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CatusStarbright
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As I said internally, I'm not sure about this bill. As I also said internally, the Act is actually called the Christmas Day (Trading) Act 2004 and not the Christmas (day) Trading Act 2004 as it is written in this bill.
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04MR17
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(Original post by mr T 999)
I'll be adding a opt out scheme in the next reading.
I'm pleased that you're responding to feedback on your items, it would help if you could have done that on some of your other items, including those which are currently being rejected in division.
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Mr T 999
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(Original post by Saunders16)
Christmas Day isn't just for Christians, what a silly response.

Edit: Your response isn't very clear but on a second read I presume you mean you will offer an opt-out to everyone?
It was just an example were a worker under current law could refuse to work on that day.
Yes it will apply to everyone it will be similar to the Sunday opt out scheme.
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Saunders16
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(Original post by mr T 999)
It was just an example were a worker under current law could refuse to work on that day.
Yes it will apply to everyone it will be similar to the Sunday opt out scheme.
I am glad to hear that you will be limiting the damage caused by this bill, but it would still be damaging. If one person works normal hours and the other one does unpaid, extra work, who will get the promotion they want? It is always going to be the person doing extra work, and this is a harmful culture that lowers productivity and makes people miserable. Although the consequences of this would be minimal, at least compared to the Sunday bill, it still moves things further towards the direction of overworking people and making it harder for small businesses to operate.

This is the issue with free-market capitalism, it sounds nice in theory because it offers choice but in practice it is very hard to not work extra hours because you want to gain promotions, which in turn causes a lot of the issues we have.
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Mr T 999
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(Original post by Saunders16)
I am glad to hear that you will be limiting the damage caused by this bill, but it would still be damaging. If one person works normal hours and the other one does unpaid, extra work, who will get the promotion they want? It is always going to be the person doing extra work, and this is a harmful culture that lowers productivity and makes people miserable. Although the consequences of this would be minimal, at least compared to the Sunday bill, it still moves things further towards the direction of overworking people and making it harder for small businesses to operate.

This is the issue with free-market capitalism, it sounds nice in theory because it offers choice but in practice it is very hard to not work extra hours because you want to gain promotions, which in turn causes a lot of the issues we have.
Doing extra work does not always collorate with getting the promotion. There are many factors that contribute to the promotion. The main factor is suck up to your manager and have good relations with them. You can do extra hours and not have good relations with the manager or you can work normal hours and have good relations with the manager. The one with the better relations with the manager will almost always get the promotion. Its office politics.
Especially if the worker can deliver good results during normal working hours without needing to do overtime.
Working on Christmas day will not make you more likely to gain a promotion over someone who doesn't work on that day.

Secondly this will not harm small businesses. Just because they are competing against large businesses during Christmas will not mean they are now doomed. If a small business can survive throughout the year competiting with large businesses without any issues. Then there will be no issue if they are to compete on Christmas. Besides not all small business remain open on Christmas and likewise not all large business will be open on Christmas.
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