Only 95% of UK adults think the Holocaust occurred Watch

ThomH97
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And 1 in 12 thinks it's been exaggerated. So says a survey by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust based on 2,000 UK adults. Does this surprise you? And should everyone be aware of it? What are the consequences if more people aren't aware of what happened?

I do think the Holocaust occurred, and I don't think it's been exaggerated to say 6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis. However, I do think other victims of the Holocaust have been ignored, for example Poles and homosexuals, and I'm rather annoyed at the BBC for leaving that out of their article. I understand that the number of Jews murdered was larger than that of other groups, but to ignore millions of other murder victims because 'not enough' were killed is wrong. On the plus side, they have at least mentioned Rwanda and Cambodia, though I wouldn't expect those to be known as well in this country which fought against the Nazi regime.

Personally, I am not worried that 5% of adults don't think the Holocaust occurred. If they also happened to think that Jews were inherently bad or inferior, then we have a problem, but just because someone isn't aware of (or denies) Pol Pot doesn't mean they're a risk to some random Cambodian walking around.
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TheMcSame
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These people breed. Let that sink in for a moment...

As for the exaggerated part? There's an argument there. Look, there's no way to say this without sounding like a douche, the Holocaust gets far more attention than it deserves. There were a good 73 million people killed during WW2. 8 million of them were Axis soldiers, many of whom were likely fighting a war they wanted no part of. 16 million of them were Allied soldiers. Fair enough, we remember them year after year. But, of the 73 million that were killed in the war, 49 million of them were civilians, and yet the focus largely seems to be on the 6 million that were Jewish. I'm not saying it doesn't deserve to be recognised, but what makes those 6 million deaths more important than the other 43 million civilian deaths that occurred? While the events themselves may not be exaggerated, the importance of such events could be argued to be exaggerated.
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Donutorchid
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
These people breed. Let that sink in for a moment...

As for the exaggerated part? There's an argument there. Look, there's no way to say this without sounding like a douche, the Holocaust gets far more attention that it deserves. There were a good 73 million people killed during WW2. 8 million of them were Axis soldiers, many of whom were likely fighting a war they wanted no part of. 16 million of them were Allied soldiers. Fair enough, we remember them year after year. But, of the 73 million that were killed in the war, 49 million of them were civilians, and yet the focus largely seems to be on the 6 million that were Jewish. I'm not saying it doesn't deserve to be recognised, but what makes those 6 million deaths more important than the other 43 million civilian deaths that occurred? While the events themselves may not be exaggerated, the importance of such events could be argued to be exaggerated.
Because racial discrimination caused war and civilians died because of the war itself. It is the idea behind that matters and a lesson to be learned. I do not even want to think about how they died or spent their last days/weeks with constant fear. Death of any human being is sad in essence but I personally differ dying in concentration camps under inhumane conditions compared to causalties of war. And there is not so much to speak about why civilians were killed because in every war this would happen (for example, from what I am learning in WWII class factories in Germany were targeted to obviously cut supplies but to achieve this there are attempts and sometimes bigger bombs are needed which kills civilians too).To prevent war of such kind, the root of problem lies on Jewish victims/minorities. But it is always good to discuss different opinions since I believe this is also helpful for a better future. Statistically speaking though I do not see 95% as a bad number at all as 100% is usually never achievable in many topics.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by ThomH97)
And 1 in 12 thinks it's been exaggerated. So says a survey by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust based on 2,000 UK adults. Does this surprise you? And should everyone be aware of it? What are the consequences if more people aren't aware of what happened?

I do think the Holocaust occurred, and I don't think it's been exaggerated to say 6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis. However, I do think other victims of the Holocaust have been ignored, for example Poles and homosexuals, and I'm rather annoyed at the BBC for leaving that out of their article. I understand that the number of Jews murdered was larger than that of other groups, but to ignore millions of other murder victims because 'not enough' were killed is wrong. On the plus side, they have at least mentioned Rwanda and Cambodia, though I wouldn't expect those to be known as well in this country which fought against the Nazi regime.

Personally, I am not worried that 5% of adults don't think the Holocaust occurred. If they also happened to think that Jews were inherently bad or inferior, then we have a problem, but just because someone isn't aware of (or denies) Pol Pot doesn't mean they're a risk to some random Cambodian walking around.
Heard this on Radio 4 on my way to the shops an hour or so ago... Shocking stuff.
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Notnek
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In other words, 5% of the UK population are complete idiots, which is sad.

(Original post by TheMcSame)
These people breed. Let that sink in for a moment...

As for the exaggerated part? There's an argument there. Look, there's no way to say this without sounding like a douche, the Holocaust gets far more attention that it deserves. There were a good 73 million people killed during WW2. 8 million of them were Axis soldiers, many of whom were likely fighting a war they wanted no part of. 16 million of them were Allied soldiers. Fair enough, we remember them year after year. But, of the 73 million that were killed in the war, 49 million of them were civilians, and yet the focus largely seems to be on the 6 million that were Jewish. I'm not saying it doesn't deserve to be recognised, but what makes those 6 million deaths more important than the other 43 million civilian deaths that occurred? While the events themselves may not be exaggerated, the importance of such events could be argued to be exaggerated.
The 12% are people that think the scale has been exaggerated - so they disagree with the 6 million figure. The Holocaust of Jews is remembered so much because it was an attempt to exterminate a whole group of people, based solely on the religion that they happened to be born into. There were 9 million Jews in Europe before WW2 and 6 million of them were killed which is just crazy.

So I completely disagree with you that the importance of the event has been exaggerated.
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username4350740
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(Original post by Notnek)
In other words, 5% of the UK population are complete idiots, which is sad.


The 12% are people that think the scale has been exaggerated - so they disagree with the 6 million figure. The Holocaust of Jews is remembered so much because it was an attempt to exterminate a whole group of people, based solely on the religion that they happened to be born into. There were 9 million Jews in Europe before WW2 and 6 million of them were killed which is just crazy.

So I completely disagree with you that the importance of the event has been exaggerated.
He does have a point though.Hitler killed 11 million people which means 5 million weren't Jewish yet you hardly hear of them.You could be forgiven for thinking there were only jewish victims of the concentration camps.That is far from the truth.And I don't like the emphasis on how we were the good guys and they were the bad guys.Its not as simple as that.

Is it more wrong to exterminate 6 million Jews or to blow two cities off the map using nuclear weapons? The firebombing of Dresden was almost certainly a war crime.When they opened some of the bomb shelters with thousands of civilians in, there weren't even any bodies left.Just liquid.I would argue that all three of those events were just as evil as what the Nazis did.Those events are not nearly as commemorated as the holocaust is.
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Dandaman1
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I think we can live with 95%.

I also agree with some of the above posts. The Holocaust gets huge recognition despite contributing a small portion of the civilian WW2 deaths, and remembrance is almost entirely focused on Jews despite them being about half of the Holocaust victims.

Yes, the Holocaust was horrible. It was the intentional attempted eradication of Jews, homosexuals, gypsies and political prisoners. But the Soviets murdered, starved to death and committed genocide against millions more people in the name of their regime than Hitler ever did. But for some reason it's OK to feature a hammer and sickle on things but not a Swastika. I mean, the Soviets were also our enemies for decades. It makes absolutely no sense to me.
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nulli tertius
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Which is 1% higher than the proportion of adults who have heard of Gordon Brown and Princess Anne and 6% higher than the proportion who have heard of John Major.
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DrMikeHuntHertz
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I wonder if those 5% are white christian heterosexual males or not?
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ltsmith
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
I wonder if those 5% are white christian heterosexual males or not?
i doubt it. the muslim community can be very anti-semitic towards jews and israelis.
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Jebedee
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Maybe if the government didn't feel the need to criminalise dissenting opinion on the matter, that 5% would be lower.

The Holocaust is certainly not my area of expertise and I don't pretend to be informed. So from a neutral point of view, it's easy to see why someone would doubt the government enforced narrative.

You don't convince people with threats but with logic and evidence.
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DrMikeHuntHertz
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(Original post by ltsmith)
i doubt it. the muslim community can be very anti-semitic towards jews and israelis.
How very racist to say that.
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ltsmith
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
How very racist to say that.
npc.StackoverflowException: cannot process clause
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Decahedron
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It shouldn't come as a surprise that 5% of the population are morons, I actually think 95% is pretty good going.
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Megxn0
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(Original post by DrMikeHuntHertz)
I wonder if those 5% are white christian heterosexual males or not?
(Original post by ltsmith)
i doubt it. the muslim community can be very anti-semitic towards jews and israelis.
I’ve only ever seen white men denying the holocaust. There are so many anti-Semitic Muslims, but I haven’t seen any literally denying genocide.
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Miss Maddie
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I'd like to know background of who these are. Foregn? 57 out of 139 countries don't teach the holocaust
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Decahedron
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(Original post by Miss Maddie)
57 out of 139 countries don't teach the holocaust
What is this weird statistic? Why only 139 countries? What was the basis for choosing countries to be involved in the study?
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AngeryPenguin
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(Original post by ltsmith)
i doubt it. the muslim community can be very anti-semitic towards jews and israelis.
Guess the Nazis were muslim too huh? No such thing as anti-semitism among white people?
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Miss Maddie
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(Original post by Decahedron)
What is this weird statistic? Why only 139 countries? What was the basis for choosing countries to be involved in the study?
I don't know why they chose the 139 countries they did. At least 57 don't teach it. Can't be surprised some people don't believe it when they could originally be from 1 of 84

https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/how-t...s-it-1.5365569
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Decahedron
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(Original post by Miss Maddie)
I don't know why they chose the 139 countries they did. At least 57 don't teach it. Can't be surprised some people don't believe it when they could originally be from 1 of 84

https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/how-t...s-it-1.5365569
For most countries it isn't their history and not even vaguely related to them.

We don't teach the history of many countries' genocides and war crimes, or even just straight up barbarity.
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