Holocaust Memorial Day Watch

the bear
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Today we remember the six million Jews murdered by Hitler and his followers in the heart of Europe.

https://www.yadvashem.org/27th/index.asp
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Fullofsurprises
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Thanks Bear for reminding us of this, one of the worst things to happen in all of human history and close to our own times.

We don't need to obsess over it to be mindful of it, but equally, it's important to read the facts and to face it. It's often a very hard thing to visualise the scale of hatred and organised cruelty that went into this and the way Hitlerism and the Nazi ideology of racial superiority and eugenicism led inexorably to it.

For people who don't know much and are curious, here is the Simple English summary from Wikipedia, which covers the basic facts in a short, clear page.
https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Holocaust
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barror1
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Thanks for sharing. I think one thing that needs to be done about the holocaust is to educate, this article is pretty damning.
https://news.sky.com/story/one-in-20...urvey-11619168
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AperfectBalance
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Are we not going to remember the non jewish people that died in the holocaust too?
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the bear
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here is a sample of what the Germans did in Poland: it is very distressing.

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In order to make the camp look like a larger temporary camp, the barracks were equipped with signs reading barracks numbers, and the gate had a sign that read “ To the Bathhouse”, while on the wall inside the barracks was a sign that read “To the Doctor”.

In addition on both doors there were signs that read “Dressing Room” for men and women respectively.

After 25-30 Jews got out the trucks and everyone was lined up in front of the barracks according to gender, the Jews were told they would have to work for Germany. They would go to cities such as Leipzig, Cologne etc.

To avoid complications and to speed up the undressing, they were further informed that they would be living in newly built barracks, and as much as possible with their entire families, but first they had to be deloused.

To make them undress quickly, they were also told that the transports would leave that very day and they should hurry up. Valuables were to be placed on the shelves above the pegs, while bread, tobacco and matches and lighters were to be wrapped in handkerchiefs or small bags and placed separately, because the filthy clothes had to be cleaned chemically and any valuables left in the pockets would have been burnt.

When everyone had stripped naked, first the women, followed immediately by the men, had to go through a door with a sign “To the Bathhouse”.
Behind the door there was a passage about 20-25 meters long and a meter and a half wide, enclosed with a fence made of wooden planks. The passage turned at a hard right angle and led to a ramp. Near the ramp was an enclosed gas-van, which the Jews had to enter.

When 70 –90 people were inside the vehicle, the doors were closed and the loaded truck headed for the furnace located 200 meters away. While travelling Laabs the driver left the vent open so that the exhaust gases passed into the sealed compartment and killed the people inside in about six minutes. The furnaces were built by SS- Hauptscharführer Runge, with the help of Jewish workers from the Lodz Ghetto, he supervised one whilst Lenz was responsible for the other one.

The furnace was described in testimony given by former prisoner Mordechai Zurawski in 1945:

“In the forest there were two identical crematoriums. The tops of the crematoria were at the ground level (they formed a pit). The furnaces were four meters deep, six meters wide, and ten meters long. The sides of the furnace gradually narrowed towards the bottom and in the place where they reached the grate. The width was approximately one meter and the length one and half meters.

The grate was made of the rails from a narrow –gauge railroad track, the side was made from chamotte brick and concrete. Under the grate, there was an ash pit linked with another pit to ensure the proper flow of air to the furnace. A layer of wood was set on fire, on which dead bodies were placed. The corpses had to be arranged in such a way that they did not touch one another. In the lowest lever there were twelve people. Their bodies were then covered with another layer of chipped wood and another layer of corpses. In this way the furnace could hold up to 100 bodies at a time. As the corpses burnt down, the free space created at the top was filled with another layer of bodies and wood.

The corpses burnt quickly, they turned to ash in more or less fifteen minutes. The ash was then removed from the ash pit with pokers of a special type. These were long iron poles with a forty- centimetre –long iron plate at the end.

Removing the ash was a difficult and hazardous job. No one could keep on with it longer than two or three days, after which the worker was unable to continue and was killed.

The bones and ashes were packed in sacks made of blankets brought by the Jews on transports. But first the bones had to be crushed with wooden stamps on a special cement foundation.

The sacks were driven out of the forest at night to Zawadka Mill and thrown into the River Warta. .
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the bear
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the above is from www.holocaustresearchproject.org/
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the bear
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(Original post by AperfectBalance)
Are we not going to remember the non jewish people that died in the holocaust too?
and it starts
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Mohammed.Al-H
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Thanks for sharing, I hope this is talked about in schools tomorrow
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Last edited by Mohammed.Al-H; 1 month ago
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Megxn0
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(Original post by Mohammed.Al-H)
Thanks for sharing, I hope this is talked about in schools tomorrow
On Wednesday, in my school we are having a full day dedicated to learning about this
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Anthos
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I've had mocks everyday for 2 weeks, so our year didn't do something for this day, but the years below did. I think they had to research victims of the Holocaust.
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AperfectBalance
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Are we not going to remember the non jewish people that died in the holocaust too?

(Original post by the bear)
and it starts
What? the coverage of jewish deaths in the holocaust is very well covered and I think it is also very important to remember that there were millions of non jews killed during the holocaust and if you add the killing of non combatant slavic people in their drive eastward then the death toll looks even more disgusting.
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Notnek
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
You must understand the Jewish propaganda doesn't care much for anyone else who was killed, as far as they're concerned only the Jews were attacked.
Of course Jews care more about the fact that 2/3 of the population of European Jews were wiped out. Just like British people care more that Brits that were killed during WW2 compared to any other country.
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TheNamesBond.
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(Original post by Notnek)
Of course Jews care more about the fact that 2/3 of the population of European Jews were wiped out. Just like British people care more that Brits that were killed during WW2 compared to any other country.
I'm not saying it's unreasonable for them to care about their ancestors that were killed, I'm saying they weren't the only victims, the Holocaust memorial day should pay equal attention to everyone who was victim to the Nazis.
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Notnek
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(Original post by TheNamesBond.)
I'm not saying it's unreasonable for them to care about their ancestors that were killed, I'm saying they weren't the only victims, the Holocaust memorial day should pay equal attention to everyone who was victim to the Nazis.
You talked about the "Jewish propaganda" which is just silly, as I explained above.

To be clear about Holocaust Memorial Day, it is designed to remember all that died in the Holocaust, not just Jews. Nearly wiping out a whole religion is a hugely significant part of it, which is why people tend to focus on that.
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AperfectBalance
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(Original post by Notnek)
You talked about the "Jewish propaganda" which is just silly, as I explained above.

To be clear about Holocaust Memorial Day, it is designed to remember all that died in the Holocaust, not just Jews. Nearly wiping out a whole religion is a hugely significant part of it, which is why people tend to focus on that.
A million people dead is a million people dead, six million people dead is six million people dead.
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Notnek
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(Original post by AperfectBalance)
A million people dead is a million people dead, six million people dead is six million people dead.
There were 9 million Jews in Europe before WW2. A targeted extermination of a people based solely on the religion that they happened to be born in killed 6 million of them. This is a crazy statistic.

This turns it into a more significant event that must be remembered to prevent a similar thing happening again.
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AperfectBalance
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(Original post by Notnek)
There were 9 million Jews in Europe before WW2. A targeted extermination of a people based solely on the religion that they happened to be born in killed 6 million of them. This is a crazy statistic.

This turns it into a more significant event that must be remembered to prevent a similar thing happening again.
No it does not, it was not any more significant due to them being jewish or whatever race/religion they were the deaths of 1 jewish man is as important as the death of 1 British man as 1 Slavic man, you would also be crazy to think that it could happen again without a insane change of circumstances.
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Notnek
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(Original post by AperfectBalance)
No it does not, it was not any more significant due to them being jewish or whatever race/religion they were the deaths of 1 jewish man is as important as the death of 1 British man as 1 Slavic man, you would also be crazy to think that it could happen again without a insane change of circumstances.
Are the deaths of all people during WW2 any more significant than the millions of people who die every day from preventable diseases? Should we remember WW2 at all?
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Decahedron
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(Original post by the bear)
and it starts
It is important to remember all the victims of the holocaust.

Nearly 17 million people were systematically killed by the brutal regime, we should not ignore the 11 million who were not Jews.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by AperfectBalance)
Are we not going to remember the non jewish people that died in the holocaust too?


What? the coverage of jewish deaths in the holocaust is very well covered and I think it is also very important to remember that there were millions of non jews killed during the holocaust and if you add the killing of non combatant slavic people in their drive eastward then the death toll looks even more disgusting.
There is also an orchestrated campaign on the part of the alt-right and the new european far right to diminish the genocide directed against the Jews by attempting to muddle it with the wider casualties of Nazism. Your posts appear to be buying into this campaign.

The genocide was directed primarily at Jews. The Nazi extermination machinery of the death camps was aimed at Jews. It also encompassed along the way some other groups such as homosexuals and gypsies.

There was no Nazi plan as such for genocide against the Slavic peoples at that time, although they did carry out huge killings in Slavic territories and particularly against Russian prisoners and against Poles. This is not to diminish those mass murders, but they are not regarded by most historians as part of the extermination effort. They were additional egregious acts of the Nazi regime, of which there were many. The extermination camps and Project Reinhardt, the planned elimination of the Jews, stand alone as infamous human acts of planned mass murder and deliberate genocide. The other killings are evil examples of the random killing and war-linked and conquest-linked extreme murderousness.
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