Is doing a GCSE in Welsh (language) worth it?

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PhoenixFortune
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I'm learning Welsh as an adult, as I hoping to move up to North Wales. However, I've found that there aren't any official Welsh proficiency tests like there is for English.

One of my English friends took a GCSE in Welsh to prove her proficiency, and I was wondering if this is common or whether it's not worth doing.

What are other people's experiences on doing GCSE Welsh, whether you did it at school or later in life?
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claireestelle
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I'm learning Welsh as an adult, as I hoping to move up to North Wales. However, I've found that there aren't any official Welsh proficiency tests like there is for English.

One of my English friends took a GCSE in Welsh to prove her proficiency, and I was wondering if this is common or whether it's not worth doing.

What are other people's experiences on doing GCSE Welsh, whether you did it at school or later in life?
I did both the second language and first language Welsh GCSEs at school and I don't think it's necessary for you to do. You won't necessarily need to speak Welsh for many jobs although some may ask for or appreciate it. I think it d be better as an adult to do evening classes in Welsh with other adults rather than a GCSE , Bangor university I think still offers Welsh classes.
Where about are you considering moving to? (I grew up in n.wales).
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by claireestelle)
I did both the second language and first language Welsh GCSEs at school and I don't think it's necessary for you to do. You won't necessarily need to speak Welsh for many jobs although some may ask for or appreciate it. I think it d be better as an adult to do evening classes in Welsh with other adults rather than a GCSE , Bangor university I think still offers Welsh classes.
Where about are you considering moving to? (I grew up in n.wales).
I've seen evening classes advertised, and they definitely look useful. I've been plodding through DuoLingo, but nothing beats actual live practice.

I'm hoping to start my PhD at Bangor in September (application/interview/funding permitting), and my research area in linguistics, so it makes sense to learn it. :awesome:
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claireestelle
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I've seen evening classes advertised, and they definitely look useful. I've been plodding through DuoLingo, but nothing beats actual live practice.

I'm hoping to start my PhD at Bangor in September (application/interview/funding permitting), and my research area in linguistics, so it makes sense to learn it. :awesome:
yes definitely get some live practice, especially for pronunciation Oh i went to school in bangor and lived 10 miles away from there
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by claireestelle)
yes definitely get some live practice, especially for pronunciation Oh i went to school in bangor and lived 10 miles away from there
I did my master's there, so really hoping to return. I also have friends who live on Anglesey and in Llandudno.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I'm learning Welsh as an adult, as I hoping to move up to North Wales. However, I've found that there aren't any official Welsh proficiency tests like there is for English.

One of my English friends took a GCSE in Welsh to prove her proficiency, and I was wondering if this is common or whether it's not worth doing.

What are other people's experiences on doing GCSE Welsh, whether you did it at school or later in life?
prob isn't but its a beautiful language so you should do it!
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claireestelle
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I did my master's there, so really hoping to return. I also have friends who live on Anglesey and in Llandudno.
i hope your phd application goes well for you
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学生の父
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I've seen evening classes advertised, and they definitely look useful. I've been plodding through DuoLingo, but nothing beats actual live practice.

I'm hoping to start my PhD at Bangor in September (application/interview/funding permitting), and my research area in linguistics, so it makes sense to learn it. :awesome:
I'm not convinced you'd need to take a GCSE, but do so by all means if it would be a confidence boost.

Bangor Uni still coordinates Welsh for Adults in the north west: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/cio/index.php.en, so you may find a course which suits your time committments and availability.

Do you have any idea which way your PhD Linguistics will lead you? Do you have a research topic in mind?
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Oscarcariad1997
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I'm learning Welsh as an adult, as I hoping to move up to North Wales. However, I've found that there aren't any official Welsh proficiency tests like there is for English.

One of my English friends took a GCSE in Welsh to prove her proficiency, and I was wondering if this is common or whether it's not worth doing.

What are other people's experiences on doing GCSE Welsh, whether you did it at school or later in life?
Yes that’s a good idea! You can take exams with learn welsh for adults: mynediad/ sylfaen/uwch/meistroli and then look at doing a GCSE with WJEC (CBAC) you can sit either welsh first language, or welsh second language.
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