Police investigate UK man for his thinking Watch

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username1738683
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The police confirmed to the Telegraph that they had met with Miller, with the officer who initiated the meeting noting that, “Although none of the tweets were criminal, I said to Mr. Miller that the limerick is the kind of thing that upsets the transgender community. I warned him that if it escalates we will have to take further action.”

During the meeting, Miller demanded to know why the person who had complained about his tweets was being described by the officer as a “victim,” when his social media use constituted no crime. At that point, the officer informed him, in a chillingly Orwellian fashion that should send shivers down the spine of every free-thinking person, that he had come to see Miller because, “We need to check your thinking.”
https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/p...-say-theyre-wo

Surprised? Not really, the police just don't know what to do with themselves.
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sknudson
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Not surprised either. Although the problem is higher up. The police are just the middlemen for the true issue of governmental tyranny.
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hello_shawn
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Well, if tweeting puts you in jail, I await the day when buying a yellow vest is a criminal offence. Then humanity IS doomed...
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Just my opinion
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Just to put this action into proportion, This is the same organisation that has looked the other way and took no action for twenty years while literally thousands upon thousands of young girls were groomed, raped, tortued and prostituted.
Last edited by Just my opinion; 1 month ago
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Tootles
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...the limerick tweet which accurately implied that transgender “women” are not, in fact, biological women.
The reporter seems to be on Harry Miller's side.
Just my opinion
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So just to get this straight, if somebody posts on here that transgender women are not in fact biological women, they run the risk of getting a visit from plod?
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username1738683
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
So just to get this straight, if somebody posts on here that transgender women are not in fact biological women, they run the risk of getting a visit from plod?
If somebody complains to them? Yes, it could well happen.
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CheeseManX
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All this media reporting about thought crimes is completely overexagerated.

In the years I've worked in the police, onlince communication offences have made up an incredibly small part of my job. It's so miniscule I hardly remember the incidents. Even then, it'll simply be a case of going to chat to a person to advise them that a complaint has been made - nothing more (unless of course there are clearly risks of harm).

Just a note regarding the article - it's not general police officers - it's a community and cohesion officer. That would be one officer in a very small department, tasked to deal with hate crimes and hate incidents. The officer has obviously received a complaint from somone, and is simply responding to that complaint - which is what we have to do with every crime / incident (we can't just close calls).

I'm not here to say whether it's right or wrong. The complaint has been made to the police, there are strict definitions nowadays in relation to hate crimes/incidents and offences relating to online communications. This is from Parliament; not the police. The officer was from a department which deals with hate within the community, and he was simply responding to a complaint by giving words of advice. It's nothing more than that.

The whole "the met has X amount of officers dedicated to trawling Twitter for hate crimes" is complete and utter tosh. Misinterpreted quote and completely out of context.
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Stiff Little Fingers
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
Just to put this action into proportion, This is the same organisation that has looked the other way and took no action for twenty years while literally thousands upon thousands of young girls were groomed, raped, tortued and prostituted.
Humberside police and South Yorkshire police (who preside over Rotherham) are different forces with no overlap in leadership so, no it's not the same organisation, it's two distinct forces that serve the same societal role. Nor should the failings of one force be used to demonise other forces or downplay other offences. I'm not too fussed about criticism of police because, y'know, ACAB but deal in facts for once.
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Cast Iron
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(Original post by CheeseManX)
Just a note regarding the article - it's not general police officers - it's a community and cohesion officer. That would be one officer in a very small department, tasked to deal with hate crimes and hate incidents. The officer has obviously received a complaint from somone, and is simply responding to that complaint - which is what we have to do with every crime / incident (we can't just close calls).
Actually you can. You can tell them that just because they might be upset or offended about something, unless it's threatening or inciting violence then it's not a matter for the police.

(Original post by CheeseManX)
I'm not here to say whether it's right or wrong. The complaint has been made to the police, there are strict definitions nowadays in relation to hate crimes/incidents and offences relating to online communications. This is from Parliament; not the police. The officer was from a department which deals with hate within the community, and he was simply responding to a complaint by giving words of advice. It's nothing more than that.

The whole "the met has X amount of officers dedicated to trawling Twitter for hate crimes" is complete and utter tosh. Misinterpreted quote and completely out of context.
Do you see how chilling it is in a democratic country that a police officer would say they need to "check your thinking" to someone? We are a free country we can think what we want and unless it's inciting violence we can say what we want to. No issue should be protected from criticism in this manner. It stunts the growth of society if we say you're not allowed to talk about a certain issue or have a debate on it. In the past when LGBT rights weren't what they are now, you were still allowed to talk about the issue and because of that we eventually arrived at where we are now, the realization that they deserve the same rights as the rest of us. Imagine if they weren't allowed to talk about it. Imagine if any time someone suggested gay people have equal rights, they were approached by police because their comments were considered "hateful" for the time and they were told to check their thinking. Would we have made even a fraction of the progress we have?


Not to turn this into product placement or anything, but perhaps the twitter user should use a new account and a VPN in future to prevent this happening again.
Last edited by Cast Iron; 1 month ago
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the bear
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a talented poet called Harry
on Twitter was wont oft to tarry;
his tongue twisting rhymes
were regarded as crimes:
such a trap for the PC unwary
Last edited by the bear; 1 month ago
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Dandaman1
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Police allegedly don't have the budget to tackle the recent increase in violent crime, still manage to routinely send out officers to investigate offensive tweets. People are literally arrested every day over the things they say on Twitter.
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Just my opinion
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(Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
Humberside police and South Yorkshire police (who preside over Rotherham) are different forces with no overlap in leadership so, no it's not the same organisation, it's two distinct forces that serve the same societal role. Nor should the failings of one force be used to demonise other forces or downplay other offences. I'm not too fussed about criticism of police because, y'know, ACAB but deal in facts for once.
I'm sorry Little Fingers but what makes you think I'm talking about Rotherham.
There have been police forces looking the other way whilst this went on in villages, towns and cities all over England.
It is the police as an organisation in general I'm talking about.
Check out the list, if you can find it, the last time I checked it was over 30 but you'll have a job as the mainstream Media don't want you to know or see how widespread it is.
As for "dealing in facts for once" perhaps you should take your own advice.
By the way, I disagree. I don't think acab.
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ThomH97
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(Original post by CheeseManX)
All this media reporting about thought crimes is completely overexagerated.

In the years I've worked in the police, onlince communication offences have made up an incredibly small part of my job. It's so miniscule I hardly remember the incidents. Even then, it'll simply be a case of going to chat to a person to advise them that a complaint has been made - nothing more (unless of course there are clearly risks of harm).

Just a note regarding the article - it's not general police officers - it's a community and cohesion officer. That would be one officer in a very small department, tasked to deal with hate crimes and hate incidents. The officer has obviously received a complaint from somone, and is simply responding to that complaint - which is what we have to do with every crime / incident (we can't just close calls).

I'm not here to say whether it's right or wrong. The complaint has been made to the police, there are strict definitions nowadays in relation to hate crimes/incidents and offences relating to online communications. This is from Parliament; not the police. The officer was from a department which deals with hate within the community, and he was simply responding to a complaint by giving words of advice. It's nothing more than that.

The whole "the met has X amount of officers dedicated to trawling Twitter for hate crimes" is complete and utter tosh. Misinterpreted quote and completely out of context.
Police officers need to be aware that they are never simply giving 'advice' if they've tracked someone down, and that's without the threat of escalating it or the claim to be checking someone's thinking. More appropriate would have been "Sorry to bother you sir, but we've received a complaint about a poem you retweeted and I'm required by law to inform you of this complaint but I stress that you have not committed any crime. Have a nice day". Clearly the community cohesion officer has responsibilities beyond the average cop, but they overstepped the mark here with the threat, even with an argumentative person such as Harry Miller. This is all assuming the account is true, of course.
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Stiff Little Fingers
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
I'm sorry Little Fingers but what makes you think I'm talking about Rotherham.
There have been police forces looking the other way whilst this went on in villages, towns and cities all over England.
It is the police as an organisation in general I'm talking about.
Check out the list, if you can find it, the last time I checked it was over 30 but you'll have a job as the mainstream Media don't want you to know or see how widespread it is.
As for "dealing in facts for once" perhaps you should take your own advice.
By the way, I disagree. I don't think acab.
Because Rotherham is the one that "free tommeh" types tend to shout about, and is the one we're now seeing trials over. In other words, it's the one that we've got grounding for, and I'm not going to entertain conspiracy theories from sites notorious for far right bull that actually it happens everywhere and "they don't want you to know" (whoever they are).

Then you don't know much about cops. Abuse of detained people was always more than a joke in cop dramas, it happened regularly. Families of police officers suffer domestic abuse shockingly regularly - http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes - while in America they're not even subtle in their institutional racism.
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Dez
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I suppose at the end of the day it's the police's job to keep the peace. Perhaps a slightly misjudged action though, and clearly not one that's actually had the desired impact.

A shame that after being told what a total pillock he's being, he's decided to double down on it rather than actually listen to anybody except himself. Now he seems to be bleating on about suppression of free speech (on Twitter and in the media, ironically). It's all rather pitiable to be honest, imagine wasting your life on all that hatred. What a pathetic individual.
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ThomH97
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(Original post by Dez)
I suppose at the end of the day it's the police's job to keep the peace. Perhaps a slightly misjudged action though, and clearly not one that's actually had the desired impact.

A shame that after being told what a total pillock he's being, he's decided to double down on it rather than actually listen to anybody except himself. Now he seems to be bleating on about suppression of free speech (on Twitter and in the media, ironically). It's all rather pitiable to be honest, imagine wasting your life on all that hatred. What a pathetic individual.
Should the police really be 'advising' people not to exercise their right to free speech under threat of escalation? I'd be quite happy for any such instances to be publicised in order to hold the police to account. That you disagree with Miller is fine, but would it be right if the cops tracked you down and 'advised' you to not call him pathetic else they might escalate things?
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Dez
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(Original post by ThomH97)
Should the police really be 'advising' people not to exercise their right to free speech under threat of escalation? I'd be quite happy for any such instances to be publicised in order to hold the police to account. That you disagree with Miller is fine, but would it be right if the cops tracked you down and 'advised' you to not call him pathetic else they might escalate things?
If the police wish to use their time to give me advice I'd be happy to listen. But from the sounds of it the police didn't make any actual threats per se, they just mentioned that his transphobia could end up costing him his job if he doesn't wind his neck in. Sounds like fairly solid advice to me but I guess he felt threatened by it somehow. Who'd have thought it eh? A thin-skinned bigot...
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ThomH97
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(Original post by Dez)
If the police wish to use their time to give me advice I'd be happy to listen. But from the sounds of it the police didn't make any actual threats per se, they just mentioned that his transphobia could end up costing him his job if he doesn't wind his neck in. Sounds like fairly solid advice to me but I guess he felt threatened by it somehow. Who'd have thought it eh? A thin-skinned bigot...
They actively tracked him down for not committing a crime. I would be surprised that you don't mind the cops wasting their time and resources tracking you down, but it's clear your personal dislike of Miller is clouding your judgement.
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Dez
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(Original post by ThomH97)
They actively tracked him down for not committing a crime. I would be surprised that you don't mind the cops wasting their time and resources tracking you down, but it's clear your personal dislike of Miller is clouding your judgement.
If you have an issue with how the police force uses its resources perhaps you should file a complaint to your local Police and Crime Commissioner.
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