DrStephenHawking
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Hey good morning, so yeah I would like to know different adventures from different people in a foundation year because is what i'm going to do this September I don't know what to expect at all.

Thanks
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mrnace
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What foundation course though?

I'm looking to do Astrophysics and have been asked to do a Foundation year in Engineering to get my mathematics up to scratch before I start the undergraduate.

It will be in Cardiff University.
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DrStephenHawking
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I meant someone who already did a foundation but u are welcome , I’m aiming for foundation queen in physics
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de0xystu
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Hey 😊 I did a foundation year in life sciences, to then go and do Biomedical Sciences. I enjoyed the year! It was a nice way to settle into university life whilst the intensity of work wasn’t too high. I was a bit jealous of some of my flat mates who were in the first year of the course I wanted to go into, but we had a nice little community on our course.
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DrStephenHawking
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de0xystu That sounds really cool mate , I expect the same experience as you. How about the average age of the people in your class or a foundation year? I just worrying if they will be younger or older than me to make an idea in my mind.(I have 22) .

How was your accomodation or flat?
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de0xystu
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I think the average age was probably standard fresher age, about 18-20 but there were a few older people! We actually had a couple of mature students in the first year in their 40s.

As for halls they were mainly 18-20 again, but there will have been some older ones. Maybe look around and see if there are halls with a wider range? Otherwise 22 is fine! It’s still very young 😊
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1Person
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I am currently studying a foundation year in science at the University of Manchester and looking forward to starting a physics (or maths and physics) course next year. Honestly, the foundation year experience can be quite different for one person or another, given the different background experiences and the variations of the syllabus across the institutions hosting the programme.
For me, it's like 50% positive and 50% a waste of time. The first semester modules were quite easy (=too easy for the most parts) and, for the first half at least, I was really just spending most of my time doing other things and avoid going to lectures and stuff. That said, the second semester (at Manchester) includes some lab work at least and the units start to become much more interesting (=challenging).
In the end, I think that a foundation year might be a little bit of a boring course to attend, but it's definitively possible to still enjoy it. After all, it's just a one-year-only course and it will help you be more prepared for your future undergraduate studies, thus you should really try to get the most out of it.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by 1Person)
I am currently studying a foundation year in science at the University of Manchester and looking forward to starting a physics (or maths and physics) course next year. Honestly, the foundation year experience can be quite different for one person or another, given the different background experiences and the variations of the syllabus across the institutions hosting the programme.
For me, it's like 50% positive and 50% a waste of time. The first semester modules were quite easy (=too easy for the most parts) and, for the first half at least, I was really just spending most of my time doing other things and avoid going to lectures and stuff. That said, the second semester (at Manchester) includes some lab work at least and the units start to become much more interesting (=challenging).
In the end, I think that a foundation year might be a little bit of a boring course to attend, but it's definitively possible to still enjoy it. After all, it's just a one-year-only course and it will help you be more prepared for your future undergraduate studies, thus you should really try to get the most out of it.
Hi. What was your academic background prior to taking the course? Do you think you were overqualified for what you are learning or do all on the course find it easy?
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1Person
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Hi. What was your academic background prior to taking the course? Do you think you were overqualified for what you are learning or do all on the course find it easy?
I have been studying in another country before. My high school diploma was a quite general one where I had to study a large number of subjects instead of focus on just a few, therefore not having the chance to get into great depth in what I liked the most. In addition to that, I didn't have the opportunity to study maths and physics at a 'higher' level since my school didn't offer this specification. I also never had lab experiences (in physics) before. That said, I always understood quite well the maths and/or physics topics which I was taught at school.
Therefore, my 'problem' was (supposedly) more about not having studied all the relevant topics required for the first year, rather than not having satisfactory grades in the required subjects. That's probably the reason why I found semester 1 so easy after all. (since the start level is quite low in order to accommodate for different backgrounds)
Even though I cannot really compare my high school qualification to A-Level (since I don't know exactly what your syllabus is and your exams difficulty), I wouldn't say that I was (particularly) overqualified since there is a number of topics in semester 2 that I have never studied before.
Anyway, to be sure about that, I would have to compare the content, and difficulty, of semester 2 of the fy to semester 1 of the first year, which is something that I would only be able to do once I will start the bachelor program, next year.
If you are from the UK and can find a way to compare your previous knowledge to what is taught in the fy it will surely help you understand if you really need to study this course or not.
Indeed, I would say that the experience is definitively not the same for everyone here. I have seen some people like me finding semester 1 too easy, as well as others finding it at the 'right' level and then some people even struggling a lot. After all, if you don't even know what a vector is or if you have never studied probability once in your whole life you can surely expect to have a lot of work to do for this course.
Last edited by 1Person; 2 years ago
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roma290718
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Early this month,I applied for foundation year (Physics) at QM, but I still did not get any offer :/. My friends are telling the that is quite hard and you need to put so much effort because there is lots of competition between students.
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