Brexit - your perspective over the years Watch

NJA
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#61
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#61
"Brexit is the architypal First World problem" - discuss
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Abaddon rex
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#62
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(Original post by DJKL)
Catch is its true and given possible issues with health cover doubt we will be able to use it as intended (long stays) post Brexit, but at least meantime it is a useful hedge against sterling, suspect it is going to be sold depending on how things go.
I keep telling my fella to sell up and buy a house somewhere warm lol
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04MR17
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#63
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
Because it was voted for in a national referendum perhaps?
Not sure you've read my whole post.

(Original post by 04MR17)
If an MP represents a strongly remain constituency why should they vote for something their constituents categorically don't want even if the rest of the country does?
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04MR17
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#64
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
Absolutely, so why is there so many voting against the will of their constituents?
Ask them, I'm not a psychiatrist.
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04MR17
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#65
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Of course they do, they're not even trying to hide their contempt of the decision to leave anymore.
The aim of the majority of parliament since the referendum has been to frustrate the vote.
You sound just like the politicians you criticise if you're going to repeat the same post I responded to.
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Abaddon rex
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#66
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Not sure you've read my whole post.
Because we live in a democracy and the vote has already been held the result was leave so mps have a duty to uphold the majority decision. Just because one particular constituency or another doesn’t agree is irrelevant after all if remainers had won the referendum would brexiteers be able to force through leaving the EU through their mp just because their constituency had a leave majority? No of course not they would be told you lost the referendum. The only reason this debate has reached the position it has is because the mps don’t know what they are doing and the media is strongly remain and so continue to promote their agenda. Look at what happened in the RoI they continued having referendums until they got the answer they wanted then hey presto no more referendums, even if those who lost the final one wanted another it’s double standards.
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Kallisto
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#67
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Not at all. When the vote was announced the pound fell in value. Each and every time there is a lurch into uncertainty, the pound drops. You might say I am noting a trend and that trends can always be bucked but I can't see how the pound will increase in strength if the cost of business is increased as Brexit under any form will do.
And that is the doubt I have too in terms of Brexit. Leaving EU seems to be risky, that should be considered.
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Abaddon rex
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#68
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(Original post by Kallisto)
And that is the doubt I have too in terms of Brexit. Leaving EU seems to be risky, that should be considered.
It’s not Brexit but the confusion over it that has left investor uncertain and led to a drop in the pound if there had not been all the doom saying around it i very much doubt it would have been any where near as bad as it has become.
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ColinDent
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#69
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(Original post by 04MR17)
You sound just like the politicians you criticise if you're going to repeat the same post I responded to.
You're the one using the politicians favourite trick of deflection.
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04MR17
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
Because we live in a democracy and the vote has already been held the result was leave so mps have a duty to uphold the majority decision. Just because one particular constituency or another doesn’t agree is irrelevant after all if remainers had won the referendum would brexiteers be able to force through leaving the EU through their mp just because their constituency had a leave majority? No of course not they would be told you lost the referendum. The only reason this debate has reached the position it has is because the mps don’t know what they are doing and the media is strongly remain and so continue to promote their agenda. Look at what happened in the RoI they continued having referendums until they got the answer they wanted then hey presto no more referendums, even if those who lost the final one wanted another it’s double standards.
So you want to see MPs contradicting the majority view of their constituents? Just so we're clear.
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04MR17
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#71
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(Original post by ColinDent)
You're the one using the politicians favourite trick of deflection.
I made counters to your points and you've refused to engage with them. Either take part in the debate or we'll end it here.
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ColinDent
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#72
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(Original post by Kallisto)
And that is the doubt I have too in terms of Brexit. Leaving EU seems to be risky, that should be considered.
It was, we were told before the referendum that it would mean leaving the single market and the customs union, we were told before the referendum that each household would be £5000 worse off a year, WW3 would start, we would have to give our firstborns over to a state run workhouse and our right legs would fall off, yet still we voted to leave, the problem is the political entity that is the EU, we simply do not like it.
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XKangaotiCX
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#73
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(Original post by StrawberryDreams)




Brexit

Everyone is talking about it, but how does the TSR community actually feel about it since this all started back in 2016?



Over the past three years we have asked for your opinions on Brexit and whether you would choose to remain in or leave the EU.



We've put a poll out each year asking you how you would vote, both before and after the referendum. We then collated your votes from these poll to see if there had been a change in opinion the further we get toward the March 29th deadline. We've seen that over these three years, there has been a shift towards more people wanting to remain in the EU.






Attachment 795714








What do you think about these results? Is it something you expected, or did you expect more of a change in opinion?



Let us know your thoughts below!





Brexit is an absolute s**t-storm, and anyone who says they know what's going on are lying. I try and ignore it until it actually, inevitably effects me.
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Kallisto
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#74
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
It’s not Brexit but the confusion over it that has left investor uncertain and led to a drop in the pound if there had not been all the doom saying around it i very much doubt it would have been any where near as bad as it has become.
It is a delicate matter and British should consider two sides of the medal before it comes to it. If they can solve the issue with the customs duties after leaving, that would be a good start.
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Abaddon rex
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#75
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(Original post by 04MR17)
So you want to see MPs contradicting the majority view of their constituents? Just so we're clear.
Yes because the majority of the nation trumps the majority of a constituency by your reasoning an mp that was elected but who was in the losing side of an election should have to do what his/her constituents want on a national scale even though his party isn’t in power it doesn’t make sense. An mp has to work for his constituency yes but in national politics it is a moot point.
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Kallisto
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#76
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(Original post by ColinDent)
It was, we were told before the referendum that it would mean leaving the single market and the customs union, we were told before the referendum that each household would be £5000 worse off a year, WW3 would start, we would have to give our firstborns over to a state run workhouse and our right legs would fall off, yet still we voted to leave, the problem is the political entity that is the EU, we simply do not like it.
If there are solutions for the main issues and everything is planned, I am serious when I wish Britain the best of luck in the future without being a part of EU anylonger.
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Burton Bridge
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#77
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Ask them, I'm not a psychiatrist.
But you seem to be OK with them doing so?
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DJKL
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#78
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
I keep telling my fella to sell up and buy a house somewhere warm lol
Ours is not that warm (well except for sometimes in the summer), it is in Sweden.
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DJKL
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#79
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
It’s not Brexit but the confusion over it that has left investor uncertain and led to a drop in the pound if there had not been all the doom saying around it i very much doubt it would have been any where near as bad as it has become.
It has not got bad yet, it will get bad if our market access abroad is seriously curtailed if under a No Deal we have a very abrupt change in rules and barriers to trade are erected virtually overnight.

Maybe having an actual plan formulated before invoking Article 50 would have alleviated some uncertainty, but after 2.5 years of bouncing through ideas, with limited confidence that if No Deal is the outcome there is much in the way of actual infrastructure or systems ready to go, business confidence has understandably become somewhat fragile, and that total inepitude will not help inspire confidence that the transition, if we even reach transition, will be much better.
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04MR17
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#80
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(Original post by Abaddon rex)
Yes because the majority of the nation trumps the majority of a constituency by your reasoning an mp that was elected but who was in the losing side of an election should have to do what his/her constituents want on a national scale even though his party isn’t in power it doesn’t make sense. An mp has to work for his constituency yes but in national politics it is a moot point.
Not "should have to do what his/her constituents want" but more should represent the views of their constituents. To be that's just representative politics, but if you want to get rid of that very very long tradition for the sake of universally upholding a non-legally-binding referendum then go ahead.
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