The 'Amendment' Thread - Parliament to debate/vote on 7 amendments Watch

MrDystopia
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Today, Parliament are back in session with respect to Brexit and Theresa May's deal.

In the days events, there will be a debate, followed by voting on 7 different amendments to the Withdrawal Agreement. These 7 were selected by the Speaker for debate, and have a received a mixture of responses from all parties.

The following is the list of amendments to be voted on:

- A (Jeremy Corbyn) would tell the government to allow time for a debate and vote on options to prevent a no-deal Brexit

- O (Ian Blackford) requires the government to ask for Article 50 to be extended and demands Scotland not be taken out of the EU given it voted to Remain

- G (Dominic Grieve) would give MPs six full days to debate and vote on alternative Brexit options

- B (Yvette Cooper) would tell the government to allow time for a bid to postpone Brexit by nine months - if it has not managed to get a deal ratified in parliament by the end of February

- J (Grieve, Benn, Rachel Reeves) tells the government to ask the EU to delay Brexit if no deal has been passed in parliament by the end of February but gives no specification of how long for

- I (Dame Caroline Spellman) - at end, add “and rejects the United Kingdom leaving the European Union without a Withdrawal Agreement and a Framework for the Future Relationship.”.

- N (Sir Graham Brady) requires the backstop plan to prevent a hard border reforming on the island of Ireland to be "replaced with alternative arrangements"

Which of these amendments do you believe will pass today, if any? And where will this take the debate/Brexit, with exactly 2 months now until the supposed date we leave by?
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Fullofsurprises
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The Speaker has narrowed it to two - the Brady (alternatives to the backstop) and Cooper (delaying Article 50) ammendments. The first is likely to pass, the second not. The PM has promised that if the result of Brady is nothing new from the EU, Parliament will still get to vote on extending Article 50, at least in general terms, although she refused to confirm it specifically.
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Fullofsurprises
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Yvette Cooper and Jeremy Corbyn in discussion across the public House about the meaning of a delay to Article 50. Corbyn recommending her ammendment as it also means No Deal is ruled out.
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Fullofsurprises
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Getting quite funny now on the questions from the Speaker enquiring if Jeremy Corbyn is giving way or not.
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Notoriety
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SNP contributions to Commons debates are always most tedious.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Notoriety)
SNP contributions to Commons debates are always most tedious.
Indeed, fatuous drivel.

I really enjoyed Ken Clarke, he talks more sense than most of his party.
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Andrew97
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A- On who decides those options, No deal is the default. The EU have said we cannot renegioate
O- How cute, the EU would never agree to that.
G- See A
B- Interesting, could help Mrs May, but again if the EU agree.
J- See B
I- Keeping us in the EU via the backdoor
N- Could easily pass, but undermines Mays orignal deal.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Andrew97)
A- On who decides those options, No deal is the default. The EU have said we cannot renegioate
O- How cute, the EU would never agree to that.
G- See A
B- Interesting, could help Mrs May, but again if the EU agree.
J- See B
I- Keeping us in the EU via the backdoor
N- Could easily pass, but undermines Mays orignal deal.
It's incredibly clear that Parliament should be allowed a series of free and indicative votes about which solution they want. This could then guide the government in approaching the EU. The underlying problem is that Theresa May has been unwilling to be guided because she has constantly (and futilely) tried to out-manouevre her backbenchers by going through a charade of seeking an impossibility (leaving the Customs Union) so that she can come back at the final hour and declare we need a long delay, or a second referendum. The trouble with this brinkmanship approach is that it already damages the UK economy more and more with each extra day of doubt and chaos.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Indeed, fatuous drivel.

I really enjoyed Ken Clarke, he talks more sense than most of his party.
Absolutely. Almost as bad as Labour ... but SNP are just time wasters, because we know they're gonna talk about the British Govt not representing the interests of Scotland and then are going to imply that Scots should be indie. Wow, I didn't think you were gonna get up and say that -- at PMQs for the 105th week in a row.

Clarke always seemed to be the most disposed to common sense. I have to say it is a bit distressing whenever he does offer his opinion on the floor -- looking a lot older each time.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Clarke always seemed to be the most disposed to common sense. I have to say it is a bit distressing whenever he does offer his opinion on the floor -- looking a lot older each time.
It's actually really sad in that he's pretty much all that's left now of the once mighty one-nation pragmatic Tory Party. The party that Theresa May leads is a bizarre mix of extremist libertarians, self-serving obsessives and ideological extremists with no understanding or perception or interest in the economy of Britain or the wellbeing of its people.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
It's actually really sad in that he's pretty much all that's left now of the once mighty one-nation pragmatic Tory Party. The party that Theresa May leads is a bizarre mix of extremist libertarians, self-serving obsessives and ideological extremists with no understanding or perception or interest in the economy of Britain or the wellbeing of its people.
The Tories were surviving on borrowed time; this issue was eventually gonna cause their destruction. There has not been a time in our generation, I don't think, when this issue wasn't dominating the internal politics of the Tories.

We just thought it was a backbench and marginal issue, so we got on with talking about gay marriage and Big Society. DC looked strong enough to see this issue put to bed, for a bit, and then BoJo's political opportunism struck.

Bring back DC, Gideon and de Pfeffel; with the former two making more of the decisions. I wonder if there were more active in the Party post-Ref there wouldn't be such a vacuum to be filled with the marginals.
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Fullofsurprises
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MPs vote against a No Deal, 318 - 310.

It's only an indicative, non-binding vote on the government, but it shows clearly that the will of the House is to prevent a no deal, excellent news. :clap2:
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
MPs vote against a No Deal, 318 - 310.

It's only an indicative, non-binding vote on the government, but it shows clearly that the will of the House is to prevent a no deal, excellent news. :clap2:
That's awful news
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Andrew97
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
MPs vote against a No Deal, 318 - 310.

It's only an indicative, non-binding vote on the government, but it shows clearly that the will of the House is to prevent a no deal, excellent news. :clap2:
It won’t make a difference
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Andrew97)
It won’t make a difference
It's going to be much harder for the Tories to plot a disastrous hard crash out, if that is the current plot - we know it's what the callous and self-serving ERG tendency want, the issue is that the May government are so weak that they may join in with them. This will make it harder for them to think they will get away with it.
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by Andrew97)
It won’t make a difference
I wish I could believe that, it basically makes a meaningful Brexit impossible. It basically means we are tired to a supersoft Brexit which means all the pain was for nothing and we had may as well remained.
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Fullofsurprises
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Brady passes through, but with a slightly smaller majority than the vote against No Deal!
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Fullofsurprises
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PM now doing her thing of hyping up what she will get from the EU - she doesn't seem to be able to resist and it will as usual bite her back, since there is no longer any reason for the EU to renegotiate. So it's coming back in chaos again in a few week's time.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
I wish I could believe that, it basically makes a meaningful Brexit impossible. It basically means we are tired to a supersoft Brexit which means all the pain was for nothing and we had may as well remained.
PM says "simply opposing a no deal is not the same as stopping it" - trying to make out she can ignore it anyway! Not sure she can.
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Andrew97
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
It's going to be much harder for the Tories to plot a disastrous hard crash out, if that is the current plot - we know it's what the callous and self-serving ERG tendency want, the issue is that the May government are so weak that they may join in with them. This will make it harder for them to think they will get away with it.
Plot a crash out? Theresa May doesn’t want to go ahead with no deal. Neither do the ERG, the ERG would prefer a deal but just want no deal as an option as you would in any negotiation.
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