Should I throw all my AS level stuff away? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
should I throw all my AS Level stuff away? I am 17 and had to drop out of education altogether due to extenuating circumstances. I am 18 next month and I am sure you can't do A level after 18 so I guess its all over anyway. Should I throw everything away?
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Idg a damn
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#2
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Nope definitely not

You can sit for A levels regardless of your age

And why are you giving up on something this important anyhow?
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apricotkanken
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#3
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#3
Definitely don’t throw ur AS stuff away, u never know at what age you’d want to come back and study! My A level biology teacher is currently doing her AS Spanish! There’s no age restriction to achieve anything
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am 18 next month and I am sure you can't do A level after 18 so I guess its all over anyway.
You can.
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Idg a damn
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I know people who are in their twenties and yet still havent gotten a degree and are still doing their A levels, so you definitely shouldnt give up now given that you are so young
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Tasnim rafa
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#6
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Definitely not! I am doing my A levels and in April I am going to be 19.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
You can.
With funding* too now!

The only time I throw out notes is if they get damaged and are no longer usable (a large portion of my 1st year uni notes got water/mould damaged when a boiler leaked in a previous house, so they went in the bin...I have the rest still, albeit not organised). Some of them I have begun using again now that I'm re-approaching education, so I'm glad I kept them

At the very least, what is the cost of keeping them compared to throwing them away? It's unlikely they'll take up an enormous amount of space, and you may well decide in future to revisit them. Better to have them and not need them than need them and not have them!

Spoiler:
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*for up to 4 A-levels at a FE provider allocated funding, see advanced learner loans for details


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Anonymous #1
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Usually colleges aak you to do an access course at 19+. Its very rare for sixth forms to accept you after a break. Also they only accept people in to A level if they have exceptional circumstances. Doubt they count illness as exceptional circumstances. I know of one girl in my sixth form who is 20 and will be 22 by the time she finishes and she says she went to a boarding school and thats why shes doing it so late. Otherwise everyone else was either 16, 17 or 18 at AS.
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Anonymous #1
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Will the AS stuff come in handy for access courses? Because i heard access courses dont go into as much detail as A level does. And i heard at 19 and over you need to pay for it yourself and take out an advanced learner loan
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Usually colleges aak you to do an access course at 19+. Its very rare for sixth forms to accept you after a break. Also they only accept people in to A level if they have exceptional circumstances. Doubt they count illness as exceptional circumstances. I know of one girl in my sixth form who is 20 and will be 22 by the time she finishes and she says she went to a boarding school and thats why shes doing it so late. Otherwise everyone else was either 16, 17 or 18 at AS.
Illness is pretty much the most common extenuating circumstance. Provided you have appropriate documentation from e.g. your GP, hospital, etc, there's little reason to believe this wouldn't be accepted.

Different providers will have different options available for learners over the age of 18. While it's certainly much more common to do those courses at those ages, that doesn't mean it's required. However it's quite possible an Access to HE course could be a better option anyway, since it's one year rather than two, and is also funded and unlike A-levels, the loan is written off if you subsequently complete a degree programme. Some Access programmes also have provision for their students to take one or two A-levels during the course if required to meet entry criteria for the course(s) the student is applying to.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Will the AS stuff come in handy for access courses? Because i heard access courses dont go into as much detail as A level does. And i heard at 19 and over you need to pay for it yourself and take out an advanced learner loan
Depends on what the Access course is, they vary quite widely; some will go into more depth than others - always check the Access course under consideration is accepted by the universities you wish to apply to. If the subject areas are the same, or overlap in some way, between the Access course and your former AS courses, then it may well be useful to refer to your earlier notes.

The advanced learner loan is much like the loans you get for degree level study, and as noted above for Access courses only the loan is written off if you subsequently graduate from an undergraduate degree course (your SFE loans won't be though).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
With funding* too now!

The only time I throw out notes is if they get damaged and are no longer usable (a large portion of my 1st year uni notes got water/mould damaged when a boiler leaked in a previous house, so they went in the bin...I have the rest still, albeit not organised). Some of them I have begun using again now that I'm re-approaching education, so I'm glad I kept them

At the very least, what is the cost of keeping them compared to throwing them away? It's unlikely they'll take up an enormous amount of space, and you may well decide in future to revisit them. Better to have them and not need them than need them and not have them!

Spoiler:
Show



*for up to 4 A-levels at a FE provider allocated funding, see advanced learner loans for details

My notes are destroyed anyway because i accidently threw fizzy drink and water on it. I still have the notes but they are destroyed
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 8 months ago
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Also they won't count my illness as an illness as the GP is refusing to provide evidence. Obviously teachers believe me, they have seen how its affecting me academically and I had no choice but to leave as I can't get support for it.
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ZombieTheWolf
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
You can.
I am legit 18, alongside half of my class studying A-levels right now 😅 where did anon hear that?
Last edited by ZombieTheWolf; 8 months ago
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ZombieTheWolf)
I am legit 18, alongside half of my class studying A-levels right now 😅 where did anon here that?
You can do it at 18 but thats your last chance. My sixth form said its 16-18 education.
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3121
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#16
You sound like you’re happy to not do your a-levels. When I couldn’t do an a-level in school I did everything I could to sit it privately. When year 13 didn’t go to plan and I was told I couldn’t retake, I found a way to make it work.

If you have a good relationship with your teachers and they understand your case they certainly won’t have an issue if you pop into lessons when you’re 19-20 or get extra help from them providing you’re paying for the exams privately. But from your tone it sounds like you’re not keen on alternatives and this was what you was hoping for so if you don’t wanna do a levels, just accept that and find something else.
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Anonymous #1
#17
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We come from a working class family so we can't afford to pay for exams. Also, I was hoping to reapply next year (even if it means going to a different college with subjects from a different exam board because my old sixth form said its not guaranteed) but I am still not better yet and I am aware that people are applying around now.

(Original post by 3121)
You sound like you’re happy to not do your a-levels. When I couldn’t do an a-level in school I did everything I could to sit it privately. When year 13 didn’t go to plan and I was told I couldn’t retake, I found a way to make it work.

If you have a good relationship with your teachers and they understand your case they certainly won’t have an issue if you pop into lessons when you’re 19-20 or get extra help from them providing you’re paying for the exams privately. But from your tone it sounds like you’re not keen on alternatives and this was what you was hoping for so if you don’t wanna do a levels, just accept that and find something else.
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chlosimorichy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
You can do it at 18 but thats your last chance. My sixth form said its 16-18 education.
I think where you're getting confused is sixth forms specifically tend to be 16-18, but they aren't the only places that provide A levels.
OP: have you tried looking into sixth form colleges? I'm 18 and in AS year at a sixth form college that essentially accepts people of any age. The only thing is if you're not starting at 16 I think some people have to pay for their exams? But education is still free.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by chlosimorichy)
I think where you're getting confused is sixth forms specifically tend to be 16-18, but they aren't the only places that provide A levels.
OP: have you tried looking into sixth form colleges? I'm 18 and in AS year at a sixth form college that essentially accepts people of any age. The only thing is if you're not starting at 16 I think some people have to pay for their exams? But education is still free.
Yeah i went to tower hamlets college which is a sixth form college.
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Kim~Shawn Mendes
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(Original post by Anonymous)
should I throw all my AS Level stuff away? I am 17 and had to drop out of education altogether due to extenuating circumstances. I am 18 next month and I am sure you can't do A level after 18 so I guess its all over anyway. Should I throw everything away?
yes u can actual do alevel after 18 i know somebody who has done this.
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