Does anyone actually bother to get a TV licence?

Watch
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I was having a conversation with some of my old uni friends about this, and usually people seem to fall into one of 3 camps.

1) They don't watch TV at all (apart from Netflix), so don't need one, 2) they only use the TV is their accommodation's communal area, which is already covered by a TV licence, or 3) they aren't clear on the rules, so never bothered to get one.

I'm curious to know if any students who are avid TV watchers (or use catch-up services) actually bother to pay for one, as nearly £150 is no small amount for students to fork out.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Let me tell you. There is a significant number of people who know exactly what the rules are and yet are not paying up, though they might not admit it.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Where is the 4th category of they decided to ake the risk , watch TV and avoid paying for a licence?

Tbf its easier than ever with streaming services to aboid the need for a licence.
You can bypass in hall and in a student house yu would share the cost if you have a communal TV.
0
reply
stoyfan
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I was having a conversation with some of my old uni friends about this, and usually people seem to fall into one of 3 camps.

1) They don't watch TV at all (apart from Netflix), so don't need one, 2) they only use the TV is their accommodation's communal area, which is already covered by a TV licence, or 3) they aren't clear on the rules, so never bothered to get one.

I'm curious to know if any students who are avid TV watchers (or use catch-up services) actually bother to pay for one, as nearly £150 is no small amount for students to fork out.
There are plenty of unis that include the TV licence fee as part of the rent.
Since enforcement is crappy, the chances of you getting in trouble is low. If TV licence men knocked on your door, do not let them in, they have the same power as normal citizens and they do not have the 'right' to enter your property.
Last edited by stoyfan; 2 years ago
1
reply
username4454836
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
If you just tell them that you have opted out they never bother you or come to check.

It is less illegal to pirate BBC programmes than it is to watch TV without a licence.
The police have said they don't come after end users of pirate services but people do get taken to court over not having a licence.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Decahedron)
If you just tell them that you have opted out they never bother you or come to check.
It is less illegal to pirate BBC programmes than it is to watch TV without a licence.
The police have said they don't come after end users of pirate services but people do get taken to court over not having a licence.

1. They do come check still. See London's post, they come even when you have a licence; and they actually ask to come in to prove you have no need for a TV, on occasion.
2. The number of prosecutions for not having a TV licence are few in number and come from self-incrimination.
3. I have to laugh at the implication that the police are somehow involved in licensing prosecutions, which are a form of private prosecutions.
4. It is the "local weights and measures authorities" which enforce s107 of the CDPA 1988, under s107A. Not the police. Most commonly it is FACT who act in private prosecutions.
Last edited by Notoriety; 2 years ago
0
reply
stoyfan
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Decahedron)
If you just tell them that you have opted out they never bother you or come to check.

It is less illegal to pirate BBC programmes than it is to watch TV without a licence.
The police have said they don't come after end users of pirate services but people do get taken to court over not having a licence.
Tax evasion issues are never the police's problem as there are other agencies (like HMRC) who investigate it.
0
reply
username4454836
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by stoyfan)
Tax evasion issues are never the police's problem as there are other agencies (like HMRC) who investigate it.
Media Piracy comes under the Police justistiction as a form of cyber crime and intellectual property theft, but they focus their resourses on shutting down servers hosting the illegal material rather than the tens of millions of end users.
0
reply
londonmyst
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
Yes.
I watch freeview channels and won't risk a criminal conviction.
I get very sour when tv licencing send me their threatening letters.
Or their inspectors turn up at my door aggressively demanding to see the postal copy of my licence and hear why my address is not listed on their licence issued database.
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by 999tigger)
Where is the 4th category of they decided to ake the risk , watch TV and avoid paying for a licence?

Tbf its easier than ever with streaming services to aboid the need for a licence.
You can bypass in hall and in a student house yu would share the cost if you have a communal TV.
None of my friends said that they were big TV watchers, so wouldn't get one anyway, so I was wondering about the stance of people that did (whether they felt pressure to get one, were happy to avoid the payment etc.).

I remember a time when BBC iPlayer was the recommended loophole, but now of course the BBC have caught wind of that. :ninja:
0
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#11
Same, I watch one BBC show a week, and then I use Netflix/YouTube for anything else. That works out to roughly £3 per show. :grumble:
0
reply
squeakysquirrel
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by Decahedron)
If you just tell them that you have opted out they never bother you or come to check.

It is less illegal to pirate BBC programmes than it is to watch TV without a licence.
The police have said they don't come after end users of pirate services but people do get taken to court over not having a licence.
Not true - my husband ( who lives in a different house - long story) does not have a TV, has not had one for about 8 years. Does not even have a computer or the internet. Doesn't use a smart phone or any modern technology. Yet every year, he gets a letter from the TV licencing folks asking him to pay for a licence or face a fine. He has written to them every year, inviting them to come and look. They never do - just keep hounding him
1
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
None of my friends said that they were big TV watchers, so wouldn't get one anyway, so I was wondering about the stance of people that did (whether they felt pressure to get one, were happy to avoid the payment etc.).

I remember a time when BBC iPlayer was the recommended loophole, but now of course the BBC have caught wind of that. :ninja:
Not to your face. Amongst the student population theres a large number if students who know the rules, but choose to take the risk. If you watch live TV in most circumstances you need a licence. Not knowing the rules doesnt cut it.
1
reply
username4454836
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Not true - my husband ( who lives in a different house - long story) does not have a TV, has not had one for about 8 years. Does not even have a computer or the internet. Doesn't use a smart phone or any modern technology. Yet every year, he gets a letter from the TV licencing folks asking him to pay for a licence or face a fine. He has written to them every year, inviting them to come and look. They never do - just keep hounding him
I used their online opt out and have never had an issue. He should give that a go if he hasn't already.

https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-...d-a-tv-licence
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I was having a conversation with some of my old uni friends about this, and usually people seem to fall into one of 3 camps.

1) They don't watch TV at all (apart from Netflix), so don't need one, 2) they only use the TV is their accommodation's communal area, which is already covered by a TV licence, or 3) they aren't clear on the rules, so never bothered to get one.

I'm curious to know if any students who are avid TV watchers (or use catch-up services) actually bother to pay for one, as nearly £150 is no small amount for students to fork out.
I've never actually known a student to buy a TV licence but I suppose they must exist
1
reply
squeakysquirrel
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by Decahedron)
I used their online opt out and have never had an issue. He should give that a go if he hasn't already.

https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-...d-a-tv-licence
He doesn't use tech - but yes I will try that for him
1
reply
stoyfan
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
(Original post by Decahedron)
Media Piracy comes under the Police justistiction as a form of cyber crime and intellectual property theft, but they focus their resourses on shutting down servers hosting the illegal material rather than the tens of millions of end users.
Quite true. If the police did try to catch those who pirate then it would be a case of wack-a-mole, except that you get some hits, but thousands of more moles appear out of their holes.

I believe that ISPs are supposed to police piracy but they aren't great at it either. Basically, this kind of stuff is difficult to police and as a result people get away with it.
0
reply
username4454836
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by stoyfan)
Quite true. If the police did try to catch those who pirate then it would be a case of wack-a-mole, except that you get some hits, but thousands of more moles appear out of their holes.

I believe that ISPs are supposed to police piracy but they aren't great at it either. Basically, this kind of stuff is difficult to police and as a result people get away with it.
If the police did manage to find everyone half the country would end up being charged, I'm sure plenty of them work for the Police in some capacity.

Can't really blame ISPs, they have to get a court order which takes time to block any sites and as soon as they block a site with say an .as domain a new mirror under .film will spring up within hours. They can't combat that with the current tools they have.
0
reply
ashwxo
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
I was having a conversation with some of my old uni friends about this, and usually people seem to fall into one of 3 camps.

1) They don't watch TV at all (apart from Netflix), so don't need one, 2) they only use the TV is their accommodation's communal area, which is already covered by a TV licence, or 3) they aren't clear on the rules, so never bothered to get one.

I'm curious to know if any students who are avid TV watchers (or use catch-up services) actually bother to pay for one, as nearly £150 is no small amount for students to fork out.
In first year, we were covered with accomodation fees so that's probably why a lot of people in university halls don't pay. In my student house, we never really watch normal TV apart from Netflix but we still got a letter through the post saying that we needed a license because the council noticed that we weren't covered. Even services such as iPlayer require one now, so even if you watch it once or twice it can be flagged. We got two warnings through the post after about a month or two in the house so we bought one, better than paying the £1000 fine
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (184)
43.6%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (49)
11.61%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (33)
7.82%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (89)
21.09%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (42)
9.95%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (25)
5.92%

Watched Threads

View All